Connectedness in Rural Nursing Distance Education and Rural Practice: Connectedness in Distance Learning

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157978
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Connectedness in Rural Nursing Distance Education and Rural Practice: Connectedness in Distance Learning
Abstract:
Connectedness in Rural Nursing Distance Education and Rural Practice: Connectedness in Distance Learning
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Rieck, Susan, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Arizona University Nursing Dept.
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:PO Box 15035, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011-5035, USA
Contact Telephone:928-523-6704
Co-Authors:Laura Crouch
Purpose/Aim: As the classroom shifts from teacher-centered to learner-centered, students are increasingly required to interact with classmates. Students and instructors learning in an online environment often perceive a lack of connection or "feeling part of" a community of learners compared with their previous experience in face to face classroom settings. Adding to the sense of disconnection is the diversity in student populations such as fast-track (second degree, life experience), traditional (recent high school graduates, generally young), satellite campus (students living on the Indian Reservation), and RN-BSN. Another factor that may lessen students' sense of connection is the variety of learning styles. The challenge for faculty is to promote student-to-student connection in distance education-online learning environments. This connection is critical as online courses are integral components of current and expanding educational expectations and are here to stay. The purpose of the project is to explore a variety of learning and communication methods that students identify as promoting student-to-student connection in the distance learning-online setting. Description: The project will review and summarize existing literature and survey fast-track, traditional, satellite campus, and RN-BSN students currently enrolled in the nursing program at Northern Arizona University. Some of the issues to be examined and explored are how to (1) promote a social relationship without physical proximity, (2) facilitate social comfort, "feeling part of" and connected with their classmates, resulting in friendly communication, (3) encourage connection through group assignments, and (4) develop the instructor's role as mentor and facilitator while becoming become decentered and shifting from the traditional authority role. Predicted Outcomes: Predicted outcomes include creating new partnerships between the diverse students with the instructor in the mentoring role through the development of new pedagogical methods and facilitation of the learning experience. Conclusion: Conclusions will be based on actual results and recommendations will be made.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConnectedness in Rural Nursing Distance Education and Rural Practice: Connectedness in Distance Learningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157978-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Connectedness in Rural Nursing Distance Education and Rural Practice: Connectedness in Distance Learning</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rieck, Susan, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Arizona University Nursing Dept.</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 15035, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011-5035, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">928-523-6704</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">susan.rieck@nau.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Laura Crouch</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aim: As the classroom shifts from teacher-centered to learner-centered, students are increasingly required to interact with classmates. Students and instructors learning in an online environment often perceive a lack of connection or &quot;feeling part of&quot; a community of learners compared with their previous experience in face to face classroom settings. Adding to the sense of disconnection is the diversity in student populations such as fast-track (second degree, life experience), traditional (recent high school graduates, generally young), satellite campus (students living on the Indian Reservation), and RN-BSN. Another factor that may lessen students' sense of connection is the variety of learning styles. The challenge for faculty is to promote student-to-student connection in distance education-online learning environments. This connection is critical as online courses are integral components of current and expanding educational expectations and are here to stay. The purpose of the project is to explore a variety of learning and communication methods that students identify as promoting student-to-student connection in the distance learning-online setting. Description: The project will review and summarize existing literature and survey fast-track, traditional, satellite campus, and RN-BSN students currently enrolled in the nursing program at Northern Arizona University. Some of the issues to be examined and explored are how to (1) promote a social relationship without physical proximity, (2) facilitate social comfort, &quot;feeling part of&quot; and connected with their classmates, resulting in friendly communication, (3) encourage connection through group assignments, and (4) develop the instructor's role as mentor and facilitator while becoming become decentered and shifting from the traditional authority role. Predicted Outcomes: Predicted outcomes include creating new partnerships between the diverse students with the instructor in the mentoring role through the development of new pedagogical methods and facilitation of the learning experience. Conclusion: Conclusions will be based on actual results and recommendations will be made.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:23:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:23:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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