2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157979
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women's Ways of Recovery: An Ethnography of Sustained Recovery
Abstract:
Women's Ways of Recovery: An Ethnography of Sustained Recovery
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Robbins, Leslie, DSN, APRN-BC, CS, CNP
P.I. Institution Name:New Mexico State University Dept of Nursing, MSC 3185
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:PO Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM, 88003, USA
Contact Telephone:505-646-2320
Specific Aims: The purpose of this study was to examine and describe the common factors to successful recovery from alcohol abuse among women and to place these factors within both the context of their social networks and the larger social environment. Background: Alcohol abuse and its related problems are among the most pervasive health and social concerns in the United States (U.S.) today. Women are especially vulnerable to the physical and social devastation of alcohol abuse. Yet, although there is extensive research about alcohol drinking patterns, treatment strategies, and early recovery, there is little information about the factors that facilitate successfully sustained abstinence in women. Methods: This study draws from the population of New Mexico, where alcohol-related deaths are the highest of any state in the U.S and the leading cause of death for individuals under the age of 65 years. The study was a focused ethnography of women who had successfully maintained long-term recovery from alcohol dependence. As an ethnographic study, data collection included participant observation, in-depth interviews with 21 women, and the collection of historical and current culturally relevant data. A purposive sampling plan was used to maximize the selection of participants who had used traditional and non-traditional approaches to recovery. Results: The analysis of the success narratives revealed two distinct findings: the first that women used several different trajectories to achieve long-term recovery. Three typologies were identified from the success narratives and labeled, A.A. as ceremony, A.A. as grounding, and Recovery as self-management. However, within each of these typologies, variations to successful recovery were seen. The second major finding was that all women articulated an overarching theme of connections as an indispensable aspect of sustained recovery. The success narratives demonstrated the powerful role that connections played in their long-term recovery and the analysis distinguished two unifying concepts of connections - those that focused beyond self (spirituality, social support, and pets) and those that focused toward self (self-nurturance, agency, and identity). Implications: Clinicians have the opportunity to allow the success story to be told during the ambulatory care visit and this focus on success strategies may have implications to sustain long term recovery. Sharing the different ways women use Alcoholics Anonymous may allow women in early recovery the opportunity to plan for successful long term sobriety using this trajectory.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen's Ways of Recovery: An Ethnography of Sustained Recoveryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157979-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women's Ways of Recovery: An Ethnography of Sustained Recovery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Robbins, Leslie, DSN, APRN-BC, CS, CNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">New Mexico State University Dept of Nursing, MSC 3185</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM, 88003, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-646-2320</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lerobbin@nmsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Specific Aims: The purpose of this study was to examine and describe the common factors to successful recovery from alcohol abuse among women and to place these factors within both the context of their social networks and the larger social environment. Background: Alcohol abuse and its related problems are among the most pervasive health and social concerns in the United States (U.S.) today. Women are especially vulnerable to the physical and social devastation of alcohol abuse. Yet, although there is extensive research about alcohol drinking patterns, treatment strategies, and early recovery, there is little information about the factors that facilitate successfully sustained abstinence in women. Methods: This study draws from the population of New Mexico, where alcohol-related deaths are the highest of any state in the U.S and the leading cause of death for individuals under the age of 65 years. The study was a focused ethnography of women who had successfully maintained long-term recovery from alcohol dependence. As an ethnographic study, data collection included participant observation, in-depth interviews with 21 women, and the collection of historical and current culturally relevant data. A purposive sampling plan was used to maximize the selection of participants who had used traditional and non-traditional approaches to recovery. Results: The analysis of the success narratives revealed two distinct findings: the first that women used several different trajectories to achieve long-term recovery. Three typologies were identified from the success narratives and labeled, A.A. as ceremony, A.A. as grounding, and Recovery as self-management. However, within each of these typologies, variations to successful recovery were seen. The second major finding was that all women articulated an overarching theme of connections as an indispensable aspect of sustained recovery. The success narratives demonstrated the powerful role that connections played in their long-term recovery and the analysis distinguished two unifying concepts of connections - those that focused beyond self (spirituality, social support, and pets) and those that focused toward self (self-nurturance, agency, and identity). Implications: Clinicians have the opportunity to allow the success story to be told during the ambulatory care visit and this focus on success strategies may have implications to sustain long term recovery. Sharing the different ways women use Alcoholics Anonymous may allow women in early recovery the opportunity to plan for successful long term sobriety using this trajectory.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:23:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:23:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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