Innovative Models of Practice in Vulnerable Populations: Home Nursing Interventions for People with HIV/AIDS: Focus on Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157980
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Innovative Models of Practice in Vulnerable Populations: Home Nursing Interventions for People with HIV/AIDS: Focus on Practice
Abstract:
Innovative Models of Practice in Vulnerable Populations: Home Nursing Interventions for People with HIV/AIDS: Focus on Practice
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Robinson, Linda, PhD, RNCS
P.I. Institution Name:University of San Diego Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA, 92110-2492, USA
Contact Telephone:619-260-4571
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of the study was to describe patient symptoms and nursing interventions within a HIV/AIDS home care population. Background: Deaths from HIV/AIDS have declined while HIV/AIDS prevalence has increased. People with advanced HIV/AIDS often require home nursing care yet little is known regarding the character and frequency of the nursing interventions provided to this vulnerable population. Resource availability (nursing care) and health status (patient symptoms) are two model level constructs to be examined when planning research using the Vulnerable Populations Model. Usual care provided to home care patients with HIV/AIDS must first be described before planning interventions to improve health status. Method: Demographic and symptom data were measured on 37 patients receiving home care from a Medicare certified home health agency that specialized in palliative care. Data were collected between October 2003 and August 2004. Nurses described their interventions using audio-recordings following their home visits. The audio-recordings were transcribed and content analyzed using the Nursing Intervention Lexicon and Taxonomy. Results: Seventy per cent of the sample was male with a mean age of 47 years and an average CD4 count of 193. On average, patients were prescribed 30 pills per day, not including PRN medications. Symptoms patients most frequently rated as "moderate" or "severe" were: numbness/tingling of feet (67.5%), numbness and tingling of legs and fatigue (56.7%), thirst, muscle aches, and weakness (54%), and, dry mouth and fear/worries (48.6%). Nursing interventions were concentrated around physiologic monitoring and adapting the home environment to assist patients to manage their medications. Implications: These results suggest that home health nurses caring for patients with HIV must be highly skilled in doing physical assessments and knowledgeable about complex medication regimens. An area for further research is exploring non-pharmacologic interventions to better manage patient symptoms without further increasing pill burden.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInnovative Models of Practice in Vulnerable Populations: Home Nursing Interventions for People with HIV/AIDS: Focus on Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157980-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Innovative Models of Practice in Vulnerable Populations: Home Nursing Interventions for People with HIV/AIDS: Focus on Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Robinson, Linda, PhD, RNCS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of San Diego Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA, 92110-2492, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">619-260-4571</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lindar@sandiego.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose of the study was to describe patient symptoms and nursing interventions within a HIV/AIDS home care population. Background: Deaths from HIV/AIDS have declined while HIV/AIDS prevalence has increased. People with advanced HIV/AIDS often require home nursing care yet little is known regarding the character and frequency of the nursing interventions provided to this vulnerable population. Resource availability (nursing care) and health status (patient symptoms) are two model level constructs to be examined when planning research using the Vulnerable Populations Model. Usual care provided to home care patients with HIV/AIDS must first be described before planning interventions to improve health status. Method: Demographic and symptom data were measured on 37 patients receiving home care from a Medicare certified home health agency that specialized in palliative care. Data were collected between October 2003 and August 2004. Nurses described their interventions using audio-recordings following their home visits. The audio-recordings were transcribed and content analyzed using the Nursing Intervention Lexicon and Taxonomy. Results: Seventy per cent of the sample was male with a mean age of 47 years and an average CD4 count of 193. On average, patients were prescribed 30 pills per day, not including PRN medications. Symptoms patients most frequently rated as &quot;moderate&quot; or &quot;severe&quot; were: numbness/tingling of feet (67.5%), numbness and tingling of legs and fatigue (56.7%), thirst, muscle aches, and weakness (54%), and, dry mouth and fear/worries (48.6%). Nursing interventions were concentrated around physiologic monitoring and adapting the home environment to assist patients to manage their medications. Implications: These results suggest that home health nurses caring for patients with HIV must be highly skilled in doing physical assessments and knowledgeable about complex medication regimens. An area for further research is exploring non-pharmacologic interventions to better manage patient symptoms without further increasing pill burden.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:23:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:23:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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