2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157982
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Long-Term Care Provider's Spiritual Concerns in Delivering End-of-Life Care
Abstract:
Long-Term Care Provider's Spiritual Concerns in Delivering End-of-Life Care
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Scholler-Jaquish, Alwilda, PhD, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Reno Orvis School of Nursing, 1664 N. Virginia Street, MS 134, Reno, NV, 89557, USA
Contact Telephone:775-784-6841
Co-Authors:Jeannie Houk
Purpose: There is a body of literature about the importance of spirituality in quality end-of-life care but there are few studies describing how healthcare providers in long-term settings perceive this care. There has been an increasing emphasis on spiritual assessment for the health care professionals caring for terminally ill persons. The individuals who provide the most direct care for terminally ill residents in long term care are Certified Nursing Assistants (CNA's), but they are not included in the professional preparation in end-of-life caring. The purpose of this study is to explore the responsiveness of health care providers (specifically, CNAs) to the spiritual needs related to quality of life in end-of-life care in long-term settings. Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: Healthcare providers working with terminally ill long-term care residents include persons with a variety of education, clinical, life, cultural and personal spiritual/religious experiences. Persons who are terminally ill and their families rely on healthcare providers for human relatedness in the final weeks, days, and hours of their lives. Healthcare workers vary significantly in their ability/willingness to provide more than physical care. It is anticipated that the quality of end-of-live care would be significantly affected by the responsiveness of health care providers to their emotional needs or desires. Studies reveal that the general public has expressed disappointment in end-of-life care (Sulmasy & McIlvane, 2002). While there have been numerous publications about the importance of spirituality in the care of the terminally ill, it is likely that few persons providing this care have access to this information. A study of the perceptions of health care providers in long term care reports that nursing aides were more aware of the pain and suffering of the residents than other members of the health care team (Flacker, Won, Kiely, & Iloputaife, 2001). It is believed that in most instances, the end-of-life care in long-term settings is provided by persons without specific preparation other than the guidelines provided by their agencies or their own personal experience. Methods: Forty-five CNAs participated in seven focus groups conducted in two long-term care facilities over a period of three months. Recordings of the interactions were transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis. Results: Themes identified in this study reveal the intensity of the experience of the CNAs providing care to terminally ill residents. Repeatedly, the respondents described their work as their ministry. They described their personal spiritual life as a way to cope with the loss of residents they had grown to love and care for. Some of the strongest themes emerged around the sense of family. The CNAs described themselves as being the family to many of the residents. Implications: Educational programs for CNAs need to include end-of-life as part of their curriculum or as a part of on-going educational programs. Nursing education programs need to include geriatric nursing and end-of-life as part of the curriculum. The quality of end-of-life care in long-term care agencies is an area for quality improvement.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLong-Term Care Provider's Spiritual Concerns in Delivering End-of-Life Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157982-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Long-Term Care Provider's Spiritual Concerns in Delivering End-of-Life Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Scholler-Jaquish, Alwilda, PhD, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Reno Orvis School of Nursing, 1664 N. Virginia Street, MS 134, Reno, NV, 89557, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">775-784-6841</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">asj@unr.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jeannie Houk</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: There is a body of literature about the importance of spirituality in quality end-of-life care but there are few studies describing how healthcare providers in long-term settings perceive this care. There has been an increasing emphasis on spiritual assessment for the health care professionals caring for terminally ill persons. The individuals who provide the most direct care for terminally ill residents in long term care are Certified Nursing Assistants (CNA's), but they are not included in the professional preparation in end-of-life caring. The purpose of this study is to explore the responsiveness of health care providers (specifically, CNAs) to the spiritual needs related to quality of life in end-of-life care in long-term settings. Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: Healthcare providers working with terminally ill long-term care residents include persons with a variety of education, clinical, life, cultural and personal spiritual/religious experiences. Persons who are terminally ill and their families rely on healthcare providers for human relatedness in the final weeks, days, and hours of their lives. Healthcare workers vary significantly in their ability/willingness to provide more than physical care. It is anticipated that the quality of end-of-live care would be significantly affected by the responsiveness of health care providers to their emotional needs or desires. Studies reveal that the general public has expressed disappointment in end-of-life care (Sulmasy &amp; McIlvane, 2002). While there have been numerous publications about the importance of spirituality in the care of the terminally ill, it is likely that few persons providing this care have access to this information. A study of the perceptions of health care providers in long term care reports that nursing aides were more aware of the pain and suffering of the residents than other members of the health care team (Flacker, Won, Kiely, &amp; Iloputaife, 2001). It is believed that in most instances, the end-of-life care in long-term settings is provided by persons without specific preparation other than the guidelines provided by their agencies or their own personal experience. Methods: Forty-five CNAs participated in seven focus groups conducted in two long-term care facilities over a period of three months. Recordings of the interactions were transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis. Results: Themes identified in this study reveal the intensity of the experience of the CNAs providing care to terminally ill residents. Repeatedly, the respondents described their work as their ministry. They described their personal spiritual life as a way to cope with the loss of residents they had grown to love and care for. Some of the strongest themes emerged around the sense of family. The CNAs described themselves as being the family to many of the residents. Implications: Educational programs for CNAs need to include end-of-life as part of their curriculum or as a part of on-going educational programs. Nursing education programs need to include geriatric nursing and end-of-life as part of the curriculum. The quality of end-of-life care in long-term care agencies is an area for quality improvement.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:23:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:23:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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