2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157983
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Patient Experience of Treatment for Hepatitis C
Abstract:
The Patient Experience of Treatment for Hepatitis C
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Sheppard, Kate, MSN, RN, APN
P.I. Institution Name:Washoe Medical Center
Title:Co-Investigator
Contact Address:PO Box 767, Graeagle, CA, 96103, USA
Contact Telephone:775-982-5839
Co-Authors:Co-Investigator
Purpose/Aim: The purpose of the study was to introduce the co-investigator to the qualitative, hermeneutic research methodology, and then apply the methodology to a pilot study focusing on individuals undergoing treatment for Hepatitis C (HCV). The research aim was to gain an understanding of the treatment experience from people who have lived through, and transitioned through, the process. Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: HCV has a propensity to lead to chronic hepatitis, which poses significant health care problems. The current treatment modality includes the administration of Interferon-(2b (IFN) and ribavirin. Numerous physical and neuropsychiatric side effects of treatment have been noted, and some are debilitating enough that patients are unable to complete the course of treatment. HCV health care providers who understand the nature of the patient treatment experience from a holistic perspective can better facilitate the patient's transition through HCV treatment. The transition framework served to guide the direction of the study, because it offered a comprehensive perspective on the phases one experiences within the context of illness. Method: Data collection consisted of engaging in a hermeneutic dialogue with four volunteer participants undergoing HCV treatment, to hear their story of life during the treatment process. Analysis included reflection and interpretation, thematic analysis and exploration of meaning, and identification of patterns common to the experience. Results: After repeated reflection, the investigators recognized that the participants all shared patterns within their HCV treatment experience, and these patterns appeared to elicit one or more common emotions of fear, anger, sadness and frustration. Analyzing the like experiences led to two emerging themes: # 1: That's not who I am, connoted by rejecting the notion of being a 'typical' patient, seeing treatment as not so bad, being 'different' during treatment, and feeling abandoned during treatment; and # 2: Looking beyond the experience was noted by looking for faith beyond traditional health care, and looking for understanding. The HCV treatment experience was seen as a process, having a start, middle, and an end, without being all consuming. Implications: The study identified the need for holistic nursing knowledge specifically geared toward patient education, mental health assessment and communication. As patients contemplate, plan for and undergo HCV treatment, the educational material must be easily understood, meaningful, and available. It becomes incumbent on the health care provider to ascertain how well the individual understands the disease and its treatment, the treatment side effects and options to manage the side effects. Due to the possible neuropsychiatric side effects of HCV treatment medication, including a mental status exam prior to and during HCV treatment, becomes vital. Communication must include a description of who is providing HCV health care, and under what conditions or limitations. Holistic nursing care includes not just eliciting a chief complaint and addressing it, but listening, considering, and even discussing additional elements of the patient's life experience.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Patient Experience of Treatment for Hepatitis Cen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157983-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Patient Experience of Treatment for Hepatitis C</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sheppard, Kate, MSN, RN, APN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washoe Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Co-Investigator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 767, Graeagle, CA, 96103, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">775-982-5839</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ksheppard@psln.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Co-Investigator</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aim: The purpose of the study was to introduce the co-investigator to the qualitative, hermeneutic research methodology, and then apply the methodology to a pilot study focusing on individuals undergoing treatment for Hepatitis C (HCV). The research aim was to gain an understanding of the treatment experience from people who have lived through, and transitioned through, the process. Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: HCV has a propensity to lead to chronic hepatitis, which poses significant health care problems. The current treatment modality includes the administration of Interferon-(2b (IFN) and ribavirin. Numerous physical and neuropsychiatric side effects of treatment have been noted, and some are debilitating enough that patients are unable to complete the course of treatment. HCV health care providers who understand the nature of the patient treatment experience from a holistic perspective can better facilitate the patient's transition through HCV treatment. The transition framework served to guide the direction of the study, because it offered a comprehensive perspective on the phases one experiences within the context of illness. Method: Data collection consisted of engaging in a hermeneutic dialogue with four volunteer participants undergoing HCV treatment, to hear their story of life during the treatment process. Analysis included reflection and interpretation, thematic analysis and exploration of meaning, and identification of patterns common to the experience. Results: After repeated reflection, the investigators recognized that the participants all shared patterns within their HCV treatment experience, and these patterns appeared to elicit one or more common emotions of fear, anger, sadness and frustration. Analyzing the like experiences led to two emerging themes: # 1: That's not who I am, connoted by rejecting the notion of being a 'typical' patient, seeing treatment as not so bad, being 'different' during treatment, and feeling abandoned during treatment; and # 2: Looking beyond the experience was noted by looking for faith beyond traditional health care, and looking for understanding. The HCV treatment experience was seen as a process, having a start, middle, and an end, without being all consuming. Implications: The study identified the need for holistic nursing knowledge specifically geared toward patient education, mental health assessment and communication. As patients contemplate, plan for and undergo HCV treatment, the educational material must be easily understood, meaningful, and available. It becomes incumbent on the health care provider to ascertain how well the individual understands the disease and its treatment, the treatment side effects and options to manage the side effects. Due to the possible neuropsychiatric side effects of HCV treatment medication, including a mental status exam prior to and during HCV treatment, becomes vital. Communication must include a description of who is providing HCV health care, and under what conditions or limitations. Holistic nursing care includes not just eliciting a chief complaint and addressing it, but listening, considering, and even discussing additional elements of the patient's life experience.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:23:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:23:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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