Supporting Self-Determination: Perspectives of Older Adults and Providers: Clinical Competencies Supporting Self-Determination of Older Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157985
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Supporting Self-Determination: Perspectives of Older Adults and Providers: Clinical Competencies Supporting Self-Determination of Older Adults
Abstract:
Supporting Self-Determination: Perspectives of Older Adults and Providers: Clinical Competencies Supporting Self-Determination of Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Sikma, Suzanne, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington, Bothell
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Box 358532, 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA, 98011-8246, USA
Contact Telephone:425-352-5324
Co-Authors:Patricia Olsen
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this research was to elucidate clinical competencies that support the self-determination of older adults participating in a community-based health promotion program. The specific aim addressed in this paper is to synthesize perceptions of participants and clinicians to develop a theory and practice-based set of clinical competencies supporting the self-determination of older adults in their self-management of chronic conditions and health promotion activities. Conceptual Basis and Background: Ryan and Deci (2002) summarized the psychological Self-Determination Theory (SDT) which posits that there are three basic psychological needs that are necessary conditions for the growth and well-being of people's personalities and cognitive structures: competence, relatedness, and autonomy. Sikma (2002) conducted an exploratory pilot study with geriatric community health nurses to elucidate nursing competencies that support consumer directed models of service. The findings, developed from the community health nurses' perspective, reflected competencies supporting consumer direction that are consistent with the three components of SDT. Sikma and Olsen conducted a second pilot study in 2004 to explore perceptions of older adults participating in the Health Enhancement Program that would help elucidate clinical competencies supporting self-determination. Method: Secondary analysis of interview transcripts with sixteen older adult participants and six registered nurses using grounded theory methodology. Results: A grounded theory of "Competencies Supporting the Self-Determination of Older Adults" was developed and will be discussed during the presentation. Exemplars will be provided of the major themes (and subdimensions) which include: autonomy support (eliciting & hearing the person's voice, honoring choice, collaborating); supporting confidence & competence (encouraging, teaching, modeling, guiding); and relational support (caring and connecting). Conclusions: These findings make explicit what a client-centered approach to health promotion and behavior change involves and the clinical competencies needed to support self-determination in accomplishing client health goals. They are strengthened by inclusion of both client and clinician perspectives. The resulting clinical competencies will be used as the basis for educational and training interventions for staff working with older adults in community-based health promotion settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSupporting Self-Determination: Perspectives of Older Adults and Providers: Clinical Competencies Supporting Self-Determination of Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157985-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Supporting Self-Determination: Perspectives of Older Adults and Providers: Clinical Competencies Supporting Self-Determination of Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sikma, Suzanne, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington, Bothell</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 358532, 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA, 98011-8246, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">425-352-5324</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ssikma@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia Olsen</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this research was to elucidate clinical competencies that support the self-determination of older adults participating in a community-based health promotion program. The specific aim addressed in this paper is to synthesize perceptions of participants and clinicians to develop a theory and practice-based set of clinical competencies supporting the self-determination of older adults in their self-management of chronic conditions and health promotion activities. Conceptual Basis and Background: Ryan and Deci (2002) summarized the psychological Self-Determination Theory (SDT) which posits that there are three basic psychological needs that are necessary conditions for the growth and well-being of people's personalities and cognitive structures: competence, relatedness, and autonomy. Sikma (2002) conducted an exploratory pilot study with geriatric community health nurses to elucidate nursing competencies that support consumer directed models of service. The findings, developed from the community health nurses' perspective, reflected competencies supporting consumer direction that are consistent with the three components of SDT. Sikma and Olsen conducted a second pilot study in 2004 to explore perceptions of older adults participating in the Health Enhancement Program that would help elucidate clinical competencies supporting self-determination. Method: Secondary analysis of interview transcripts with sixteen older adult participants and six registered nurses using grounded theory methodology. Results: A grounded theory of &quot;Competencies Supporting the Self-Determination of Older Adults&quot; was developed and will be discussed during the presentation. Exemplars will be provided of the major themes (and subdimensions) which include: autonomy support (eliciting &amp; hearing the person's voice, honoring choice, collaborating); supporting confidence &amp; competence (encouraging, teaching, modeling, guiding); and relational support (caring and connecting). Conclusions: These findings make explicit what a client-centered approach to health promotion and behavior change involves and the clinical competencies needed to support self-determination in accomplishing client health goals. They are strengthened by inclusion of both client and clinician perspectives. The resulting clinical competencies will be used as the basis for educational and training interventions for staff working with older adults in community-based health promotion settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:23:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:23:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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