Innovative Models of Practice in Vulnerable Populations: Administrative Perspective of the Vulnerable Populations Model

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157991
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Innovative Models of Practice in Vulnerable Populations: Administrative Perspective of the Vulnerable Populations Model
Abstract:
Innovative Models of Practice in Vulnerable Populations: Administrative Perspective of the Vulnerable Populations Model
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Strehlow, Aaron, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of California Los Angeles Health Center at Union Rescue Mission
Title:Administrator
Contact Address:545 S. San Pedro St., Los Angeles, CA, 90013-2010, USA
Contact Telephone:213-673-4849
Co-Authors:Marie N. Fongwa
Purpose/Aims: The focus of this presentation is on how the vulnerable populations model (Flaskerud & Winslow, 1998) might be clinically applied to health centers from an administrative perspective while highlighting the example of an Academic Nursing Center for the homeless. Background: Vulnerable populations are usually defined as social groups who experience differential patterns of morbidity, disparities in health status and early mortality. Use of the vulnerable populations model helps to explain relationships between resources, health risks, morbidity, mortality and disability (Flaskerud & Winslow, 1998). Practice, research, ethics and public policy interact with the above concepts. The model is based on reducing health disparities in a population, rather than individuals. Many communities have set up health centers designed at meeting their communityÆs needs as evidenced by the numbers of members in the National Association of Community Health Centers. Additionally, Schools of Nursing have developed academic nursing centers that not only allow for student and faculty practice, but also provide care to many vulnerable populations. Eliminating health disparities by 2010 challenges health care researchers and clinicians to explore, understand and eliminate barriers to health care faced by vulnerable groups. Examining the vulnerable populations model from the administrative point of view elucidates the structure, process and outcome involved in providing health care to vulnerable groups. According to Donabedian (1966), the structure provides foundation for certain caring processes and subsequent outcomes. Adaptation of the vulnerable populations model to encompass an administrative focus of a health center would appear to be a natural progression in the modelÆs development. This adaptation might allow nurse administrators an opportunity to explore relationships between health center resources, risks to patients and the ultimate health outcomes. Methods: Theoretical, descriptive and case study report highlights over 21 years of experience in the area of providing primary health care to the homeless and indigent population in an academic nursing center. Results: Clinic data depicts 2500 unduplicated patients, with over 6000 patient encounters receiving primary health care annually. Over 85% of patients report being satisfied with care, staff turnover remains low, quality improvement standards remain above acceptable levels and student experiences are continually ranked high. Sixty percent of staff received student loan repayment benefits for working in the health center. Implications: Use of conceptual models in nursing helps guide practice, education and research. Adaptation of the vulnerable populations model from an administrative perspective appears to be yet another useful application for nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInnovative Models of Practice in Vulnerable Populations: Administrative Perspective of the Vulnerable Populations Modelen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157991-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Innovative Models of Practice in Vulnerable Populations: Administrative Perspective of the Vulnerable Populations Model</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Strehlow, Aaron, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California Los Angeles Health Center at Union Rescue Mission</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Administrator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">545 S. San Pedro St., Los Angeles, CA, 90013-2010, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">213-673-4849</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sonhcurm@ucla.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marie N. Fongwa</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The focus of this presentation is on how the vulnerable populations model (Flaskerud &amp; Winslow, 1998) might be clinically applied to health centers from an administrative perspective while highlighting the example of an Academic Nursing Center for the homeless. Background: Vulnerable populations are usually defined as social groups who experience differential patterns of morbidity, disparities in health status and early mortality. Use of the vulnerable populations model helps to explain relationships between resources, health risks, morbidity, mortality and disability (Flaskerud &amp; Winslow, 1998). Practice, research, ethics and public policy interact with the above concepts. The model is based on reducing health disparities in a population, rather than individuals. Many communities have set up health centers designed at meeting their community&AElig;s needs as evidenced by the numbers of members in the National Association of Community Health Centers. Additionally, Schools of Nursing have developed academic nursing centers that not only allow for student and faculty practice, but also provide care to many vulnerable populations. Eliminating health disparities by 2010 challenges health care researchers and clinicians to explore, understand and eliminate barriers to health care faced by vulnerable groups. Examining the vulnerable populations model from the administrative point of view elucidates the structure, process and outcome involved in providing health care to vulnerable groups. According to Donabedian (1966), the structure provides foundation for certain caring processes and subsequent outcomes. Adaptation of the vulnerable populations model to encompass an administrative focus of a health center would appear to be a natural progression in the model&AElig;s development. This adaptation might allow nurse administrators an opportunity to explore relationships between health center resources, risks to patients and the ultimate health outcomes. Methods: Theoretical, descriptive and case study report highlights over 21 years of experience in the area of providing primary health care to the homeless and indigent population in an academic nursing center. Results: Clinic data depicts 2500 unduplicated patients, with over 6000 patient encounters receiving primary health care annually. Over 85% of patients report being satisfied with care, staff turnover remains low, quality improvement standards remain above acceptable levels and student experiences are continually ranked high. Sixty percent of staff received student loan repayment benefits for working in the health center. Implications: Use of conceptual models in nursing helps guide practice, education and research. Adaptation of the vulnerable populations model from an administrative perspective appears to be yet another useful application for nursing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:24:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:24:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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