2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157993
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Another Barrier to Mammography Screening: Experiences Across the Life Span
Abstract:
Another Barrier to Mammography Screening: Experiences Across the Life Span
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Thomas, Eileen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:MSC09 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:505-272-5807
Purposes/Aims: Numerous studies have focused on identifying barriers to breast cancer screening and on the mammography screening behaviors of ethnic minority women, yet little is know about the impact of prior experiences on womenÆs current mammography screening behaviors. The purpose of these preliminary studies was to explore womenÆs experiences across the life span pertaining to their breasts and current mammography screening behaviors. A second aim was to compare experiences and mammography screening behaviors within and between racial/ethnic groups. Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: Despite a recent decline in breast cancer mortality, there has not been a significant change in breast cancer mortality rates among women from ethnic minority groups. For both African Americans and Hispanics, the percentage of women who have had mammography has not increased significantly. Late diagnosis resulting in poorer prognosis is a primary reason for the disparity in cancer survival and mortality among ethnic minority women. Critical social theory (CST) and feminist perspectives formed the frameworks for these studies. One fundamental conviction of CST is that ôno aspect of social phenomena can be understood unless it is related to the history and social structure in which it is foundö (Fulton, 1997, p. 530). Rather than separating womenÆs experiences from the contexts in which they occur, both critical social theory and feminist perspectives recognize womenÆs experiences as inextricably connected to the larger political, social and economic environment. Methods: In two separate preliminary studies, professional African American and Hispanic women were asked to write or share stories of experiences related to their breasts, including stories about their past mammography screening experiences and current mammography screening behaviors. Twelve African American and 10 Hispanic women shared audiotaped or written stories about experiences concerning their breasts including mammography screening, and about their current mammography screening behaviors. Stories were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis. Results: Both African American and Hispanic women share similar experiences. Findings from these studies strongly suggest that womenÆs past experiences and associated gender issues have an influence on womenÆs mammography screening behaviors. The findings suggest that perceptions formed during puberty and messages women receive across the life span can leave women with feelings of shame regarding their breasts that can have a long-term effect on how women perceive their bodies and the value of early breast cancer detection. Implications: Cultural beliefs and feelings concerning past experiences may act as barriers to behaviors related to cancer prevention and cancer screening. Gaining a better understanding of womenÆs experiences in relation to their breasts will provide insights into developing more culturally acceptable cancer prevention and screening programs that will effectively serve ethnic minority women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAnother Barrier to Mammography Screening: Experiences Across the Life Spanen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157993-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Another Barrier to Mammography Screening: Experiences Across the Life Span</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thomas, Eileen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MSC09 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-272-5807</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eithomas@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: Numerous studies have focused on identifying barriers to breast cancer screening and on the mammography screening behaviors of ethnic minority women, yet little is know about the impact of prior experiences on women&AElig;s current mammography screening behaviors. The purpose of these preliminary studies was to explore women&AElig;s experiences across the life span pertaining to their breasts and current mammography screening behaviors. A second aim was to compare experiences and mammography screening behaviors within and between racial/ethnic groups. Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: Despite a recent decline in breast cancer mortality, there has not been a significant change in breast cancer mortality rates among women from ethnic minority groups. For both African Americans and Hispanics, the percentage of women who have had mammography has not increased significantly. Late diagnosis resulting in poorer prognosis is a primary reason for the disparity in cancer survival and mortality among ethnic minority women. Critical social theory (CST) and feminist perspectives formed the frameworks for these studies. One fundamental conviction of CST is that &ocirc;no aspect of social phenomena can be understood unless it is related to the history and social structure in which it is found&ouml; (Fulton, 1997, p. 530). Rather than separating women&AElig;s experiences from the contexts in which they occur, both critical social theory and feminist perspectives recognize women&AElig;s experiences as inextricably connected to the larger political, social and economic environment. Methods: In two separate preliminary studies, professional African American and Hispanic women were asked to write or share stories of experiences related to their breasts, including stories about their past mammography screening experiences and current mammography screening behaviors. Twelve African American and 10 Hispanic women shared audiotaped or written stories about experiences concerning their breasts including mammography screening, and about their current mammography screening behaviors. Stories were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis. Results: Both African American and Hispanic women share similar experiences. Findings from these studies strongly suggest that women&AElig;s past experiences and associated gender issues have an influence on women&AElig;s mammography screening behaviors. The findings suggest that perceptions formed during puberty and messages women receive across the life span can leave women with feelings of shame regarding their breasts that can have a long-term effect on how women perceive their bodies and the value of early breast cancer detection. Implications: Cultural beliefs and feelings concerning past experiences may act as barriers to behaviors related to cancer prevention and cancer screening. Gaining a better understanding of women&AElig;s experiences in relation to their breasts will provide insights into developing more culturally acceptable cancer prevention and screening programs that will effectively serve ethnic minority women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:24:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:24:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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