2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157995
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Latino Cultural Preferences to Modify a Diabetes Self-Management Program
Abstract:
Latino Cultural Preferences to Modify a Diabetes Self-Management Program
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Vincent, Deborah, PhD, RN, FAANP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona College of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:1305 N. Martin, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA
Contact Telephone:520-626-9969
Co-Authors:Lauren Clark
Purpose/Aims: Diabetes Mellitus is a serious, potentially debilitating chronic illness that has reached epidemic proportions. The risk of developing type 2 diabetes for Latinos is two to three times that of non-Latino whites and the mortality rate is twice that of non-Latinos. Good self-management and glycemic control can decrease diabetes complications. Translating self-management programs into workable processes for Latino populations is challenging, primarily because so much of self-management depends on patients changing their cultural patterns of eating and activity. The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of type 2 diabetes for urban Latinos and to explore the components of a diabetes self-management program that could be modified to be culturally competent for this population. Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: Diabetes is one of the top three health disparities affecting Latinos. Latinos have a three-fold increase in the prevalence of diabetes and are at greater risk of developing complications from diabetes. Both prevalence and complication risk appear to be multifactorial and include genetics, lifestyle, cultural beliefs, and access to care. Latinos seem to have difficulty in achieving adequate glucose control and, as a result, have often been labeled as non-compliant1. Cultural beliefs about diet, weight, and exercise, and beliefs about the importance of family rather than individualism, may all contribute to difficulties in achieving glycemic control in Latinos. The conceptual model used in this study was an adaptation of the Chronic Disease Self-management Model2. This model examines the effect of patient characteristics, culturally competent intervention, and self-efficacy on health status. Methods: Six focus groups were held a total of 40 subjects. Four of the focus groups were comprised of Latino men and women with diabetes and two were comprised of family caregivers. Recordings of the interactions were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Results: Subjects stated that being diagnosed or having a family member diagnosed with diabetes was a life changing and stressful experience. They reported wanting more information and support for managing their disease. Additionally, they wanted a diabetes self-management program to address and be congruent with Latino cultural beliefs, specifically in regards to diet, differences family situations and home remedies. Implications: Findings from the study suggest specific cultural adaptations that, when used in conjunction with recommendations for improving glycemic control, may result in improved outcomes for Latino clients with Diabetes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLatino Cultural Preferences to Modify a Diabetes Self-Management Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157995-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Latino Cultural Preferences to Modify a Diabetes Self-Management Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vincent, Deborah, PhD, RN, FAANP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1305 N. Martin, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520-626-9969</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dvincent@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lauren Clark</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: Diabetes Mellitus is a serious, potentially debilitating chronic illness that has reached epidemic proportions. The risk of developing type 2 diabetes for Latinos is two to three times that of non-Latino whites and the mortality rate is twice that of non-Latinos. Good self-management and glycemic control can decrease diabetes complications. Translating self-management programs into workable processes for Latino populations is challenging, primarily because so much of self-management depends on patients changing their cultural patterns of eating and activity. The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of type 2 diabetes for urban Latinos and to explore the components of a diabetes self-management program that could be modified to be culturally competent for this population. Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: Diabetes is one of the top three health disparities affecting Latinos. Latinos have a three-fold increase in the prevalence of diabetes and are at greater risk of developing complications from diabetes. Both prevalence and complication risk appear to be multifactorial and include genetics, lifestyle, cultural beliefs, and access to care. Latinos seem to have difficulty in achieving adequate glucose control and, as a result, have often been labeled as non-compliant1. Cultural beliefs about diet, weight, and exercise, and beliefs about the importance of family rather than individualism, may all contribute to difficulties in achieving glycemic control in Latinos. The conceptual model used in this study was an adaptation of the Chronic Disease Self-management Model2. This model examines the effect of patient characteristics, culturally competent intervention, and self-efficacy on health status. Methods: Six focus groups were held a total of 40 subjects. Four of the focus groups were comprised of Latino men and women with diabetes and two were comprised of family caregivers. Recordings of the interactions were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Results: Subjects stated that being diagnosed or having a family member diagnosed with diabetes was a life changing and stressful experience. They reported wanting more information and support for managing their disease. Additionally, they wanted a diabetes self-management program to address and be congruent with Latino cultural beliefs, specifically in regards to diet, differences family situations and home remedies. Implications: Findings from the study suggest specific cultural adaptations that, when used in conjunction with recommendations for improving glycemic control, may result in improved outcomes for Latino clients with Diabetes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:24:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:24:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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