2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157996
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sleep Patterns in First Time Parents
Abstract:
Sleep Patterns in First Time Parents
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Ward, Teresa, RN, MSN, FNP-C
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, San Francisco
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:, San Francisco, CA, USA
Co-Authors:Kathryn A. Lee
Background: Transition to parenthood may be a stressful period for first time parents. Disruptions in sleep, work schedules and daily routines occur simultaneously, which may have an adverse effect on parentsÆ wellbeing, marital satisfaction and coping mechanisms. Several studies document the impact of disturbed sleep on mood, behavior and health when sleep has been measured subjectively through parental reports. However, few studies have objectively examined sleep patterns in first time parents. Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast objective and subjective sleep measures in first time parents. Sample: As part of a randomized clinical trial, data were collected from childbearing couples during the last month of pregnancy and at one, two and three months postpartum. All couples expecting their first singleton child were recruited from childbirth education classes. The sample was 60% White, 18% Asian, 14% Hispanic, 6% Mixed/Other, and 3% Black. The mean age for mothers was 31.9 + 5.2 years and fathers 33.9 + 6.9 years. Subjects were partnered, educated, and had moderate-high incomes. Prior to delivery, 77% of mothers and 88% of fathers were employed. Two to four weeks post delivery, 4% of mothers and 86% of fathers were employed. This analysis reports on the 72 couples assigned to the control group and data from the first, second and third month postpartum periods. Methods: Mothers and fathers recorded their sleep patterns in sleep diaries, completed the General Sleep Disturbance Scale (GSDS), and wore a wrist actigraph for 2 consecutive days and nights. Data were analyzed using the autoscoring program for sleep available in Action 4 software (Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc., Ardsley, New York) and two sleep variables are included here: 1) total sleep time (TST) at night and 2) wake after sleep onset (WASO). Results: Moderate to strong associations were found between mothers and fathers for their TST during the first (r =.41, p<.01), second (r =.39, p<.01), and third (r =.61, p<.01) months postpartum. Interestingly, associations between parental reports of sleep quality and TST or WASO were not significant. Parental ratings of infant temperament at 1 month postpartum were correlated with infant temperament ratings at 2 and 3 months postpartum. There were significant associations between mother and father stress scores at each time point: first (r= .31, p<.01), second (r= .26, p< .05), and third (r= .33, p< .01) postpartum months. Both motherÆs and fatherÆs stress scores at 1 month were associated with their stress scores at 2 and 3 months postpartum. Implications: Despite the lack of an association between parental self-reports of sleep quality and actigraph TST and WASO, findings highlight the importance of evaluating parentsÆ perception of sleep. Furthermore, during stressful situations, such as the postpartum period, when parents are making a role transition and their emotional, social, and physical states are depleted, assessing for disturbed sleep is crucial in maintaining their health and well-being, and parent-infant relations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSleep Patterns in First Time Parentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157996-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sleep Patterns in First Time Parents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ward, Teresa, RN, MSN, FNP-C</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, San Francisco, CA, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tward@itsa.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathryn A. Lee</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Transition to parenthood may be a stressful period for first time parents. Disruptions in sleep, work schedules and daily routines occur simultaneously, which may have an adverse effect on parents&AElig; wellbeing, marital satisfaction and coping mechanisms. Several studies document the impact of disturbed sleep on mood, behavior and health when sleep has been measured subjectively through parental reports. However, few studies have objectively examined sleep patterns in first time parents. Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast objective and subjective sleep measures in first time parents. Sample: As part of a randomized clinical trial, data were collected from childbearing couples during the last month of pregnancy and at one, two and three months postpartum. All couples expecting their first singleton child were recruited from childbirth education classes. The sample was 60% White, 18% Asian, 14% Hispanic, 6% Mixed/Other, and 3% Black. The mean age for mothers was 31.9 + 5.2 years and fathers 33.9 + 6.9 years. Subjects were partnered, educated, and had moderate-high incomes. Prior to delivery, 77% of mothers and 88% of fathers were employed. Two to four weeks post delivery, 4% of mothers and 86% of fathers were employed. This analysis reports on the 72 couples assigned to the control group and data from the first, second and third month postpartum periods. Methods: Mothers and fathers recorded their sleep patterns in sleep diaries, completed the General Sleep Disturbance Scale (GSDS), and wore a wrist actigraph for 2 consecutive days and nights. Data were analyzed using the autoscoring program for sleep available in Action 4 software (Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc., Ardsley, New York) and two sleep variables are included here: 1) total sleep time (TST) at night and 2) wake after sleep onset (WASO). Results: Moderate to strong associations were found between mothers and fathers for their TST during the first (r =.41, p&lt;.01), second (r =.39, p&lt;.01), and third (r =.61, p&lt;.01) months postpartum. Interestingly, associations between parental reports of sleep quality and TST or WASO were not significant. Parental ratings of infant temperament at 1 month postpartum were correlated with infant temperament ratings at 2 and 3 months postpartum. There were significant associations between mother and father stress scores at each time point: first (r= .31, p&lt;.01), second (r= .26, p&lt; .05), and third (r= .33, p&lt; .01) postpartum months. Both mother&AElig;s and father&AElig;s stress scores at 1 month were associated with their stress scores at 2 and 3 months postpartum. Implications: Despite the lack of an association between parental self-reports of sleep quality and actigraph TST and WASO, findings highlight the importance of evaluating parents&AElig; perception of sleep. Furthermore, during stressful situations, such as the postpartum period, when parents are making a role transition and their emotional, social, and physical states are depleted, assessing for disturbed sleep is crucial in maintaining their health and well-being, and parent-infant relations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:24:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:24:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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