2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157997
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Physical Activity on Health Behaviors of African American Women
Abstract:
Effects of Physical Activity on Health Behaviors of African American Women
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Waters, Catherine, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of California-San Francisco, School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:2 Koret Avenue, Box 0608, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0608, USA
Contact Telephone:415-502-7995
Co-Authors:Pamela R. Jones, LaConnie Taylor-Jones
Background: Evidence for the health benefits of regular, moderate-intensity physical activity continues to be strong, especially for women. Yet, we are still lagging behind in knowledge about how to help different groups of people become more physically active within their social context. African American women bear a disproportionate burden of the leading causes of deaths in the US, a majority of which could be minimized by healthy lifestyle behaviors, such as engaging in physical activity. Women are the primary caretakers of the family, and they set "healthy" lifestyle standards for their families. Conceptual Basis: BanduraÆs Social Cognitive Theory was the theoretical basis of the study. Social cognitive theory focuses on helping individuals enhance self-efficacy, and posits that behavior change is a function of expectations about perceived ability to perform the behavior; thus, the higher the self-efficacy, the better the outcomes. Purposes/Aims: The central hypothesis of this community-based randomized controlled trial is that a culturally-focused physical activity enhancement intervention will increase physical activity behavior, and thus, improve health-related quality of life over time. Methods: The sample included 136 overweight, physically inactive African American women, aged 18-49 years old, who were recruited from public/subsidized housing developments in a northern California urban city. They were randomly assigned to either the Heart-of-A-Woman physical activity intervention or a comparable attention intervention without the physical activity component. Results: Analyses included repeated measures ANOVA to assess change in study outcomes at baseline and 3-months for all subjects. As compared to control group subjects, intervention group subjects had positive statistically significant changes from baseline to 3 months in body mass index, health-related quality of life, sleep quality, health promotion practices, enjoyment of physical activity, physical activity self-efficacy, and participation in moderate to vigorous physical activity. Implications: The findings fill an existing gap by examining a socioculturally-based intervention that targets a group that is sedentary and disproportionately at risk for health problems, for which physical activity can provide benefits. In addition, a great deal was learned about the assessment of physical activity in African American womenÆs lives. Study findings show that nurses can develop and implement physical activity programs that fit within the sociocultural context of peopleÆs everyday life.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Physical Activity on Health Behaviors of African American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157997-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Physical Activity on Health Behaviors of African American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Waters, Catherine, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California-San Francisco, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2 Koret Avenue, Box 0608, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0608, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">415-502-7995</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">catmwaters@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Pamela R. Jones, LaConnie Taylor-Jones</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Evidence for the health benefits of regular, moderate-intensity physical activity continues to be strong, especially for women. Yet, we are still lagging behind in knowledge about how to help different groups of people become more physically active within their social context. African American women bear a disproportionate burden of the leading causes of deaths in the US, a majority of which could be minimized by healthy lifestyle behaviors, such as engaging in physical activity. Women are the primary caretakers of the family, and they set &quot;healthy&quot; lifestyle standards for their families. Conceptual Basis: Bandura&AElig;s Social Cognitive Theory was the theoretical basis of the study. Social cognitive theory focuses on helping individuals enhance self-efficacy, and posits that behavior change is a function of expectations about perceived ability to perform the behavior; thus, the higher the self-efficacy, the better the outcomes. Purposes/Aims: The central hypothesis of this community-based randomized controlled trial is that a culturally-focused physical activity enhancement intervention will increase physical activity behavior, and thus, improve health-related quality of life over time. Methods: The sample included 136 overweight, physically inactive African American women, aged 18-49 years old, who were recruited from public/subsidized housing developments in a northern California urban city. They were randomly assigned to either the Heart-of-A-Woman physical activity intervention or a comparable attention intervention without the physical activity component. Results: Analyses included repeated measures ANOVA to assess change in study outcomes at baseline and 3-months for all subjects. As compared to control group subjects, intervention group subjects had positive statistically significant changes from baseline to 3 months in body mass index, health-related quality of life, sleep quality, health promotion practices, enjoyment of physical activity, physical activity self-efficacy, and participation in moderate to vigorous physical activity. Implications: The findings fill an existing gap by examining a socioculturally-based intervention that targets a group that is sedentary and disproportionately at risk for health problems, for which physical activity can provide benefits. In addition, a great deal was learned about the assessment of physical activity in African American women&AElig;s lives. Study findings show that nurses can develop and implement physical activity programs that fit within the sociocultural context of people&AElig;s everyday life.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:24:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:24:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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