2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157998
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Computer-Based Health Education for Rural Women: Knowledge Gained
Abstract:
Computer-Based Health Education for Rural Women: Knowledge Gained
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Weinert, Clarann, SC, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University-Bozeman College of Nursing
Title:Professor
Contact Address:1 Sherrick Hall, P.O. Box 173560, Bozeman, MT, 59717-3560, USA
Contact Telephone:406-994-6036
Co-Authors:Wade Hill
Purpose: The Women to Women Project was designed to enable chronically ill rural women to better manage their long-term illness by providing computer-based support and health information. In this paper, the changes in health knowledge will be discussed. Background: The computer-based intervention is multi-faceted allowing for the enhancement of information on health promotion and chronic illness management through the use of online health teaching modules (computer skills, womenÆs health, family finances, nutrition/food safety, and chronic illness management). The modules are facilitated by expert-guided discussion using asynchronous chatrooms. Isolated rural women develop Web skills to access health information and to critically evaluate the resources, thus positioning themselves to better manage their chronic illness through optimal self-management and expanded health information to assist in health care decisions. Methods: Each cohort participated for 24 months. The treatment group engaged in the computer intervention for 5 months and the control group had no access to the intervention. A repeated measures design was used in which the same battery of pyschosocial and health knowledge acquisition indicators was administered to all participants at six time points over the course of the study. The data for this presentation were generated from 2002 to 2004. Included in the analysis for this presentation are the baseline (T1) and end of computer intervention (T3) data points. Of the 92 women, 93% were Caucasian, 79% married, with a mean age of 54.1, a mean number of years of education of 14.4, and a median income of $25,000 to $34,999. The average length of time since diagnosis was 12.7 years and they a wide variety of chronic conditions (multiple sclerosis, 25%; rheumatoid conditions, 38%; diabetes, 13%; cancer, 12%; cardiovascular, 3%). Results: A repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to evaluate the effect of the computerized intervention on knowledge acquisition. The initial model tested included the dependent variable of percent of test items correct (total items = 29), one within-subjects factor of time, i.e., baseline measurement to 5 month measurement), and one between subjects factor of membership in the treatment or control group. A significant time by treatment interaction (f (1, 90) = 35.71, p =0.00 ) suggests that the treatment group improved to a significant extent in their test scores between baseline and follow-up testing. Descriptively, the intervention group improved their test scores from 56% on pretest to 70% after the intervention, while the control group did not change appreciably (52.3% to 52.4%). Implications: The application of telecommunications technology in nursing research and practice are beginning to be demonstrated as effective means for reaching geographically and socially isolated individuals. The challenge is to dream big, to strategize with nursing and interdisciplinary colleagues, and to risk unique approaches when conducting research with these vulnerable and hard to access rural dwellers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComputer-Based Health Education for Rural Women: Knowledge Gaineden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157998-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Computer-Based Health Education for Rural Women: Knowledge Gained</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Weinert, Clarann, SC, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University-Bozeman College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1 Sherrick Hall, P.O. Box 173560, Bozeman, MT, 59717-3560, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406-994-6036</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cweinert@montana.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Wade Hill</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The Women to Women Project was designed to enable chronically ill rural women to better manage their long-term illness by providing computer-based support and health information. In this paper, the changes in health knowledge will be discussed. Background: The computer-based intervention is multi-faceted allowing for the enhancement of information on health promotion and chronic illness management through the use of online health teaching modules (computer skills, women&AElig;s health, family finances, nutrition/food safety, and chronic illness management). The modules are facilitated by expert-guided discussion using asynchronous chatrooms. Isolated rural women develop Web skills to access health information and to critically evaluate the resources, thus positioning themselves to better manage their chronic illness through optimal self-management and expanded health information to assist in health care decisions. Methods: Each cohort participated for 24 months. The treatment group engaged in the computer intervention for 5 months and the control group had no access to the intervention. A repeated measures design was used in which the same battery of pyschosocial and health knowledge acquisition indicators was administered to all participants at six time points over the course of the study. The data for this presentation were generated from 2002 to 2004. Included in the analysis for this presentation are the baseline (T1) and end of computer intervention (T3) data points. Of the 92 women, 93% were Caucasian, 79% married, with a mean age of 54.1, a mean number of years of education of 14.4, and a median income of $25,000 to $34,999. The average length of time since diagnosis was 12.7 years and they a wide variety of chronic conditions (multiple sclerosis, 25%; rheumatoid conditions, 38%; diabetes, 13%; cancer, 12%; cardiovascular, 3%). Results: A repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to evaluate the effect of the computerized intervention on knowledge acquisition. The initial model tested included the dependent variable of percent of test items correct (total items = 29), one within-subjects factor of time, i.e., baseline measurement to 5 month measurement), and one between subjects factor of membership in the treatment or control group. A significant time by treatment interaction (f (1, 90) = 35.71, p =0.00 ) suggests that the treatment group improved to a significant extent in their test scores between baseline and follow-up testing. Descriptively, the intervention group improved their test scores from 56% on pretest to 70% after the intervention, while the control group did not change appreciably (52.3% to 52.4%). Implications: The application of telecommunications technology in nursing research and practice are beginning to be demonstrated as effective means for reaching geographically and socially isolated individuals. The challenge is to dream big, to strategize with nursing and interdisciplinary colleagues, and to risk unique approaches when conducting research with these vulnerable and hard to access rural dwellers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:24:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:24:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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