Multiple Approaches to Assessing the Nursing Work Environment: State-Wide Assessment of the Nursing Work Environment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157999
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Multiple Approaches to Assessing the Nursing Work Environment: State-Wide Assessment of the Nursing Work Environment
Abstract:
Multiple Approaches to Assessing the Nursing Work Environment: State-Wide Assessment of the Nursing Work Environment
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Weston, Marla, RN, MS
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona Nurses Association
Title:Executive Director
Contact Address:1850 E Southern Avenue, Suite 1, Tempe, AZ, 85282-5832, USA
Contact Telephone:480-831-0404
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the nursing work environment of hospital-employed registered nurses in Arizona, and compare it to best practice magnet facilities. Background: During the last nursing shortage in the early 1980Æs, the American Academy of Nursing commissioned a study of hospitals that had demonstrated ability to attract and retain nurses. The characteristics of these ômagnetö hospitals have continued to be associated with the attraction and retention of nurses as well as improved patient outcomes. Methods: The Revised Nursing Work Index (NWI-R), a 51-item 4-point Likert-type scale, was utilized to measure four attributes of the nursing work environment: autonomy, control over nursing practice, relationships with physicians, and organizational support (Aiken & Patrician, 2000). Fifty-five of the 82 hospitals in Arizona participated in the study. Participating hospitals distributed the surveys to the registered nurses employed at their facilities who worked at least 50% of their time doing direct patient care. The participating registered nurses returned the survey in a sealed envelope. A total of 4,286 registered nurses participated (23.4% response rate). This is estimated to be 18.9% of registered nurses working as direct care providers in Arizona hospitals. The geographic distribution, age, and gender of the respondents mirrored that of the population. Diploma-prepared nurses were under-represented in the sample and associate-degree prepared nurses were over-represented. Results: The mean subscale scores for Arizona participants were lower for autonomy, control over practice/environment, and organization support as compared to magnet facilities; Arizona mean scores were higher for relationships with physicians than magnet hospital means. The scores from Arizona hospitals varied greatly and no one hospital scored the highest or lowest in all four subscales. In addition, no Arizona hospital's mean subscale score in autonomy, control over practice/environment, or organizational support exceeded the magnet hospital means. Demographic data were used to compare subscale scores of respondents of differing geographic locales, educational preparation, work status, gender, and age. Some statistically significant differences were identified, however, upon further analysis these differences were attributable to the large sample size and were of small effect (less than 1%). Implications: NursesÆ reports on their work environment did not vary based upon the demographic characteristics of geographic locale, educational preparation, work status or gender. However, results of this study suggest that within the same geographic region, there are wide variations in the nursing work environment of hospitals.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMultiple Approaches to Assessing the Nursing Work Environment: State-Wide Assessment of the Nursing Work Environmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157999-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Multiple Approaches to Assessing the Nursing Work Environment: State-Wide Assessment of the Nursing Work Environment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Weston, Marla, RN, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Executive Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1850 E Southern Avenue, Suite 1, Tempe, AZ, 85282-5832, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">480-831-0404</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">marla@aznurse.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the nursing work environment of hospital-employed registered nurses in Arizona, and compare it to best practice magnet facilities. Background: During the last nursing shortage in the early 1980&AElig;s, the American Academy of Nursing commissioned a study of hospitals that had demonstrated ability to attract and retain nurses. The characteristics of these &ocirc;magnet&ouml; hospitals have continued to be associated with the attraction and retention of nurses as well as improved patient outcomes. Methods: The Revised Nursing Work Index (NWI-R), a 51-item 4-point Likert-type scale, was utilized to measure four attributes of the nursing work environment: autonomy, control over nursing practice, relationships with physicians, and organizational support (Aiken &amp; Patrician, 2000). Fifty-five of the 82 hospitals in Arizona participated in the study. Participating hospitals distributed the surveys to the registered nurses employed at their facilities who worked at least 50% of their time doing direct patient care. The participating registered nurses returned the survey in a sealed envelope. A total of 4,286 registered nurses participated (23.4% response rate). This is estimated to be 18.9% of registered nurses working as direct care providers in Arizona hospitals. The geographic distribution, age, and gender of the respondents mirrored that of the population. Diploma-prepared nurses were under-represented in the sample and associate-degree prepared nurses were over-represented. Results: The mean subscale scores for Arizona participants were lower for autonomy, control over practice/environment, and organization support as compared to magnet facilities; Arizona mean scores were higher for relationships with physicians than magnet hospital means. The scores from Arizona hospitals varied greatly and no one hospital scored the highest or lowest in all four subscales. In addition, no Arizona hospital's mean subscale score in autonomy, control over practice/environment, or organizational support exceeded the magnet hospital means. Demographic data were used to compare subscale scores of respondents of differing geographic locales, educational preparation, work status, gender, and age. Some statistically significant differences were identified, however, upon further analysis these differences were attributable to the large sample size and were of small effect (less than 1%). Implications: Nurses&AElig; reports on their work environment did not vary based upon the demographic characteristics of geographic locale, educational preparation, work status or gender. However, results of this study suggest that within the same geographic region, there are wide variations in the nursing work environment of hospitals.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:24:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:24:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.