2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158000
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parental Perceptions of Family Processes in Unintended Adolescent Pregnancy
Abstract:
Parental Perceptions of Family Processes in Unintended Adolescent Pregnancy
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Williams, Jacquelyn, DSN, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:New Mexico State University - Box 30001
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Dept. of Nursing - MSC3185, Las Cruces, NM, 88003, USA
Contact Telephone:505-646-6719
Purposes/Aims: Little is known about the impact of unintended adolescent pregnancy on family adaptation when the adolescent daughter lives at home with family members. The purpose of this quantitative study was to explore relationships between variables influencing family functioning in a sample of families in a southwestern border community in which a daughter 14-18 years of age was pregnant or in the early parenting phase. Primary analysis of the research questions focused on mother-daughter dyads. Approximately half the families included a father figure in the family of origin household. This phase of data analysis focuses on mother-father perceptions of family processes in families having a father in the home. Background/Conceptual Framework: Promoting the functioning of the family of origin is one strategy for improving health outcomes for pregnant and parenting adolescents. The Double ABC-X Model of Family Adaptation is used to explore the relationship of family stress, coping, and communication to two key facets of family adaptation: cohesion and adaptability. The study examines the variables in the post-crisis phase of the model. Data from families with fathers in the home was compared for correlations between mother and father perceptions of 3 independent variables (family stress, family coping, and parent adolescent communication) and 2 independent facets of family adaptation (family cohesion and family adaptability). In the collection of family variables, a frequent practice is the collection of family data from only one parent or the pooling of parental data. Evidence is accumulating that mothers and fathers cannot be considered equivalent to one another in studies with family level variables. Although the sample of 2 parent families was not sufficient to detect differences in mean scores, correlational analysis indicates that parental perceptions of the variables are different from one another. Methods: Two groups of adolescents and parents were recruited. Parents and daughters completed questionnaires measuring the variables. Group 1 contained 20 two-parent families whose daughter was at 20 or greater weeks of gestation who completed the questionnaires one time. Group 2 contained 22 two-parent families who completed the questionnaires at the time of delivery of a healthy infant and again at 8 weeks postpartum. Results: Ninety-three percent of the mothers and all of the fathers were Hispanic. MothersÆ and fathersÆ perceptions of family stress were highly and significantly correlated at all three intervals (r=.66, p=.002; r=.83, p <.0001; r=.92, p<.0001, respectively). Perceptions of family coping were significantly correlated at delivery (r=.70, p= .008) and 8 weeks postpartum (r=.61, p=.006) but were not correlated during the last half of pregnancy. MotherÆs and fathersÆ perceptions of their individual communication with their daughter were not significantly correlated during the last half of pregnancy or at the time of delivery but were highly and significantly correlated at 8 weeks postpartum (r=.77, p=.0001). Perceptions of family cohesion were not correlated between mothers and fathers during last half of pregnancy but were highly and significantly correlated at delivery (r=.65, p=.002) and at 8 weeks postpartum (r=.89, p<.0001). ParentsÆ perceptions of family adaptability were significantly correlated at all three intervals (r=.52, p=.02; r=.91, p<.0001; r=.88, p=<.0001) but with higher correlations at delivery and 8 weeks postpartum than during the pregnancy of the daughter. Implications: ParentsÆ view of major family processes are not mirror images. The significant and surprising variations between mothersÆ and fathersÆ perceptions of family stress, coping, communication and adaptation at different phases of the experience of having a pregnant or parenting adolescent daughter indicate that interventions to promote family functioning will require attention to both parentsÆ perceptions and responses at different points.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParental Perceptions of Family Processes in Unintended Adolescent Pregnancyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158000-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parental Perceptions of Family Processes in Unintended Adolescent Pregnancy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Williams, Jacquelyn, DSN, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">New Mexico State University - Box 30001</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Dept. of Nursing - MSC3185, Las Cruces, NM, 88003, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-646-6719</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jacwilli@nmsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: Little is known about the impact of unintended adolescent pregnancy on family adaptation when the adolescent daughter lives at home with family members. The purpose of this quantitative study was to explore relationships between variables influencing family functioning in a sample of families in a southwestern border community in which a daughter 14-18 years of age was pregnant or in the early parenting phase. Primary analysis of the research questions focused on mother-daughter dyads. Approximately half the families included a father figure in the family of origin household. This phase of data analysis focuses on mother-father perceptions of family processes in families having a father in the home. Background/Conceptual Framework: Promoting the functioning of the family of origin is one strategy for improving health outcomes for pregnant and parenting adolescents. The Double ABC-X Model of Family Adaptation is used to explore the relationship of family stress, coping, and communication to two key facets of family adaptation: cohesion and adaptability. The study examines the variables in the post-crisis phase of the model. Data from families with fathers in the home was compared for correlations between mother and father perceptions of 3 independent variables (family stress, family coping, and parent adolescent communication) and 2 independent facets of family adaptation (family cohesion and family adaptability). In the collection of family variables, a frequent practice is the collection of family data from only one parent or the pooling of parental data. Evidence is accumulating that mothers and fathers cannot be considered equivalent to one another in studies with family level variables. Although the sample of 2 parent families was not sufficient to detect differences in mean scores, correlational analysis indicates that parental perceptions of the variables are different from one another. Methods: Two groups of adolescents and parents were recruited. Parents and daughters completed questionnaires measuring the variables. Group 1 contained 20 two-parent families whose daughter was at 20 or greater weeks of gestation who completed the questionnaires one time. Group 2 contained 22 two-parent families who completed the questionnaires at the time of delivery of a healthy infant and again at 8 weeks postpartum. Results: Ninety-three percent of the mothers and all of the fathers were Hispanic. Mothers&AElig; and fathers&AElig; perceptions of family stress were highly and significantly correlated at all three intervals (r=.66, p=.002; r=.83, p &lt;.0001; r=.92, p&lt;.0001, respectively). Perceptions of family coping were significantly correlated at delivery (r=.70, p= .008) and 8 weeks postpartum (r=.61, p=.006) but were not correlated during the last half of pregnancy. Mother&AElig;s and fathers&AElig; perceptions of their individual communication with their daughter were not significantly correlated during the last half of pregnancy or at the time of delivery but were highly and significantly correlated at 8 weeks postpartum (r=.77, p=.0001). Perceptions of family cohesion were not correlated between mothers and fathers during last half of pregnancy but were highly and significantly correlated at delivery (r=.65, p=.002) and at 8 weeks postpartum (r=.89, p&lt;.0001). Parents&AElig; perceptions of family adaptability were significantly correlated at all three intervals (r=.52, p=.02; r=.91, p&lt;.0001; r=.88, p=&lt;.0001) but with higher correlations at delivery and 8 weeks postpartum than during the pregnancy of the daughter. Implications: Parents&AElig; view of major family processes are not mirror images. The significant and surprising variations between mothers&AElig; and fathers&AElig; perceptions of family stress, coping, communication and adaptation at different phases of the experience of having a pregnant or parenting adolescent daughter indicate that interventions to promote family functioning will require attention to both parents&AElig; perceptions and responses at different points.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:24:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:24:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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