2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158001
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maternal Perceptions of Early Breastfeeding and Feeding Outcomes at 6 Weeks
Abstract:
Maternal Perceptions of Early Breastfeeding and Feeding Outcomes at 6 Weeks
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Wojnar, Danuta, RN, MN, MEd, PhDc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:Health Sciences Building, Campus Box 357262, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Contact Telephone:206-221-2918
Background: There is extensive evidence about benefits of exclusive breastfeeding to maternal and infant health. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of a childÆs life and breastfeeding with the addition of complementary foods for up to years and beyond. Despite the existing evidence and clear WHO recommendations about the duration of breastfeeding, the majority of women in North America continue to abandon breastfeeding long before the recommended period. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore whether breastfeeding status at 6 weeks is related to the motherÆs perceptions of her infant behavior, the breastfeeding experience itself, and of herself as a mother during postpartum hospitalization. Sample: One hundred and ten mothers and their newborns who met the inclusion criteria were recruited from a tertiary level hospital, postpartum unit subsequent to the Institutional Human SubjectsÆ Review Committee approval. The majority of participants was primaparous, over 25 years of age, partnered, and had college education. Methods and Setting: A prospective correlational design was used. Outcome Measures included: (1) Maternal perceptions of the overall infant behavior, of the breastfeeding experience, and of herself as a mother measured by the Mother and Baby Scales (MABS) (Wolke & St. James Roberts, 1986, 1995); and (2) Breastfeeding rates at 6 weeks postpartum. Findings: At 6 weeks postpartum, 80 (74.8%) participants were breastfeeding and 27 (25.8%) had stopped. Maternal perceptions of infant alertness/responsiveness (A) (r= 0.54, p< 0.01), irritability during feeds (IDF) (r=-0.34, p < 0.01) and lack of confidence in feeding during postpartum hospitalization (LCF) (r=0.33, p <0.01) of the MABS neonatal scales were significantly correlated with breastfeeding status at 6 weeks. Independent samples t-tests to compare differences between primaparous and multiparous women perceptions of early breastfeeding produces higher scores for multiparous women on all MABS subscales; however, these differences did not reach statistical significance. This might be explained by the availability of lactation consultant (IBCLS) support 24 hours a day, seven days a weeks at the site where this study was conducted. At 6 weeks telephone follow-up, the majority of women reported positive breastfeeding experiences, which included feelings of enhanced attachment, enjoyment, and a sense of pride and fulfillment. Participants indicated that learning about infant behaviors, states and cues contributed to their confidence and success at breastfeeding. Negative experiences were related to perceived insufficient milk supply, illness, and incompatibility of lactation with personal needs and life style. Conclusions: The findings highlight the importance of early maternal perceptions of their infantÆs behaviors and of self as a mother in sustaining breastfeeding. Availability of skillful breastfeeding support combined with teaching infant cues and behaviors make positive contributions to breastfeeding duration. Limitations: The sample was of convenience, data were collected in a single site. The responses to open-ended questions asked at 6 weeks telephone follow-up cannot match the nature of audio-taped qualitative data elicited from in-depth interviews. In this study, the researcher took notes as women described their experiences over phone.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaternal Perceptions of Early Breastfeeding and Feeding Outcomes at 6 Weeksen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158001-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Maternal Perceptions of Early Breastfeeding and Feeding Outcomes at 6 Weeks</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wojnar, Danuta, RN, MN, MEd, PhDc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Health Sciences Building, Campus Box 357262, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-221-2918</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">danutaw@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: There is extensive evidence about benefits of exclusive breastfeeding to maternal and infant health. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of a child&AElig;s life and breastfeeding with the addition of complementary foods for up to years and beyond. Despite the existing evidence and clear WHO recommendations about the duration of breastfeeding, the majority of women in North America continue to abandon breastfeeding long before the recommended period. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore whether breastfeeding status at 6 weeks is related to the mother&AElig;s perceptions of her infant behavior, the breastfeeding experience itself, and of herself as a mother during postpartum hospitalization. Sample: One hundred and ten mothers and their newborns who met the inclusion criteria were recruited from a tertiary level hospital, postpartum unit subsequent to the Institutional Human Subjects&AElig; Review Committee approval. The majority of participants was primaparous, over 25 years of age, partnered, and had college education. Methods and Setting: A prospective correlational design was used. Outcome Measures included: (1) Maternal perceptions of the overall infant behavior, of the breastfeeding experience, and of herself as a mother measured by the Mother and Baby Scales (MABS) (Wolke &amp; St. James Roberts, 1986, 1995); and (2) Breastfeeding rates at 6 weeks postpartum. Findings: At 6 weeks postpartum, 80 (74.8%) participants were breastfeeding and 27 (25.8%) had stopped. Maternal perceptions of infant alertness/responsiveness (A) (r= 0.54, p&lt; 0.01), irritability during feeds (IDF) (r=-0.34, p &lt; 0.01) and lack of confidence in feeding during postpartum hospitalization (LCF) (r=0.33, p &lt;0.01) of the MABS neonatal scales were significantly correlated with breastfeeding status at 6 weeks. Independent samples t-tests to compare differences between primaparous and multiparous women perceptions of early breastfeeding produces higher scores for multiparous women on all MABS subscales; however, these differences did not reach statistical significance. This might be explained by the availability of lactation consultant (IBCLS) support 24 hours a day, seven days a weeks at the site where this study was conducted. At 6 weeks telephone follow-up, the majority of women reported positive breastfeeding experiences, which included feelings of enhanced attachment, enjoyment, and a sense of pride and fulfillment. Participants indicated that learning about infant behaviors, states and cues contributed to their confidence and success at breastfeeding. Negative experiences were related to perceived insufficient milk supply, illness, and incompatibility of lactation with personal needs and life style. Conclusions: The findings highlight the importance of early maternal perceptions of their infant&AElig;s behaviors and of self as a mother in sustaining breastfeeding. Availability of skillful breastfeeding support combined with teaching infant cues and behaviors make positive contributions to breastfeeding duration. Limitations: The sample was of convenience, data were collected in a single site. The responses to open-ended questions asked at 6 weeks telephone follow-up cannot match the nature of audio-taped qualitative data elicited from in-depth interviews. In this study, the researcher took notes as women described their experiences over phone.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:24:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:24:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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