2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158003
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions of Health Seeking Behaviors by American Indians with C.M.I.
Abstract:
Perceptions of Health Seeking Behaviors by American Indians with C.M.I.
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Yurkovich, Eleanor, EdD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota College of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:PO Box 9025, Grand Forks, ND, 58202, USA
Contact Telephone:701-777-4554
Co-Authors:Izetta Hopkins-Lattergrass, Sara Roy
Background: Nationally, it is known that disparity exists in the delivery of and ability to access mental health care. Federal reports indicate this discrimination is greater towards minority groups. Coupled with both of these issues is the need to deliver culturally responsive care to all clients. Purpose/Conceptual Framework: These three points clearly connect with this qualitative grounded theory study focused on describing the concept of health, and health seeking behaviors as perceived by Native American Indians with chronic mental illness (CMI). Symbolic Interactionism is the conceptual framework that guided this work. Methods: Between 2001 and 2004, 44 Native American Indians with CMI were audio taped during interviews. Theoretical sampling was accomplished through diverse demographics and diagnoses, with interviews being completed on four rural, American Indian Reservations. The researchers used constant comparative analysis for data processing. Findings: A model emerged depicting the definition of health as ôbeing in balance or a sense of harmony;ö to be healthy, they need the skills to maintain equilibrium among their cognitive, emotional, spiritual, and physical realms (medicine wheel). Because of identified barriers, health seeking behaviors often involved avoiding mental health problems by self-medicating their symptoms through chemical use/abuse until a health crisis forced them to access acute care services or family/self initiated incarceration. Health seeking strategies identified as culturally relevant included: utilization of ceremonies, sweats, and other spiritual practices, individual and group talking therapies; community centers or ôpsychosocial clubsö for peer support; sheltered work opportunities for ômeaningful doing;ö use of solitude; adequate amounts of sleep, exercise, and food; and employment of medications when they are a ôfit.ö Implications: To provide culturally responsive care, the research team emphasizes the benefits of providing treatment on the reservation where there are Native healers, and a holistic cultural approach. This is also supported by current health professionals who have a vision to integrate Native American Indian ceremonies and traditions more visibly into the treatment plan. Nurses need to recognize the importance of understanding the history of the tribe (trauma and losses), and their beliefs and customs so that care occurs within their political and cultural framework. Education about mental illness is considered necessary to empower the clients and reduce the barrier of stigma. Nurses should be aware of the cultural differences in American IndiansÆ physical responses toward medications. Clients will need to be taught by the nurse therapist about the treatment process to reduce ôno shows.ö Nurses must be strong advocates for adequate funding of education, programs, space and staff at the state and federal level to reduce barriers and disparities present in providing culturally relevant mental health services to Native American Indians.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions of Health Seeking Behaviors by American Indians with C.M.I.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158003-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceptions of Health Seeking Behaviors by American Indians with C.M.I.</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yurkovich, Eleanor, EdD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 9025, Grand Forks, ND, 58202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">701-777-4554</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eleanoryurkovich@mail.und.nodak.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Izetta Hopkins-Lattergrass, Sara Roy</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Nationally, it is known that disparity exists in the delivery of and ability to access mental health care. Federal reports indicate this discrimination is greater towards minority groups. Coupled with both of these issues is the need to deliver culturally responsive care to all clients. Purpose/Conceptual Framework: These three points clearly connect with this qualitative grounded theory study focused on describing the concept of health, and health seeking behaviors as perceived by Native American Indians with chronic mental illness (CMI). Symbolic Interactionism is the conceptual framework that guided this work. Methods: Between 2001 and 2004, 44 Native American Indians with CMI were audio taped during interviews. Theoretical sampling was accomplished through diverse demographics and diagnoses, with interviews being completed on four rural, American Indian Reservations. The researchers used constant comparative analysis for data processing. Findings: A model emerged depicting the definition of health as &ocirc;being in balance or a sense of harmony;&ouml; to be healthy, they need the skills to maintain equilibrium among their cognitive, emotional, spiritual, and physical realms (medicine wheel). Because of identified barriers, health seeking behaviors often involved avoiding mental health problems by self-medicating their symptoms through chemical use/abuse until a health crisis forced them to access acute care services or family/self initiated incarceration. Health seeking strategies identified as culturally relevant included: utilization of ceremonies, sweats, and other spiritual practices, individual and group talking therapies; community centers or &ocirc;psychosocial clubs&ouml; for peer support; sheltered work opportunities for &ocirc;meaningful doing;&ouml; use of solitude; adequate amounts of sleep, exercise, and food; and employment of medications when they are a &ocirc;fit.&ouml; Implications: To provide culturally responsive care, the research team emphasizes the benefits of providing treatment on the reservation where there are Native healers, and a holistic cultural approach. This is also supported by current health professionals who have a vision to integrate Native American Indian ceremonies and traditions more visibly into the treatment plan. Nurses need to recognize the importance of understanding the history of the tribe (trauma and losses), and their beliefs and customs so that care occurs within their political and cultural framework. Education about mental illness is considered necessary to empower the clients and reduce the barrier of stigma. Nurses should be aware of the cultural differences in American Indians&AElig; physical responses toward medications. Clients will need to be taught by the nurse therapist about the treatment process to reduce &ocirc;no shows.&ouml; Nurses must be strong advocates for adequate funding of education, programs, space and staff at the state and federal level to reduce barriers and disparities present in providing culturally relevant mental health services to Native American Indians.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:24:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:24:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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