2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158004
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cross Cultural Exploration of Diabetes Self-Care Beliefs and Behaviors
Abstract:
Cross Cultural Exploration of Diabetes Self-Care Beliefs and Behaviors
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Allen, Carol, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Title:Clinical Associate Professor
Contact Address:Intercollegiate College of Nursing, 2917 West Fort George Wright Drive, Spokane, WA, 99224, USA
Contact Telephone:509-324-7262
Co-Authors:Jill Armstrong Shultz, PhD, and Cynthia F. Corbett, PhD, RN
Purpose: The purpose of this research is to compare self-care beliefs and behaviors related to diabetes and cardiovascular disease among women immigrants from the former Soviet Union with non-immigrant, non-Hispanic white women. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Among people with diabetes, approximately 80% die from cardiovascular disease (CVD) and outcomes are less optimistic for women than men. CVD complications for people with type 2 diabetes can be delayed and/or reduced by tight blood pressure (BP) and lipid control. The majority of persons with diabetes in the United States have BP and lipid levels in excess of the recommended values. Unfortunately, immigrant clients' misinformation about disease and treatment and their cultural beliefs about health and nutrition, as well as language barriers and health providers' insufficient knowledge on how to best approach care and education for this understudied group, further interfere with optimal treatment. Pilot data from the investigators' prior research revealed that immigrants from the former Soviet Union had glycosylated A1C levels similar to their non-immigrant, non-Hispanic age and gender-matched counterparts, but significantly worse BP and lipid profiles. Methods: Soviet immigrant women with type 2 diabetes (n=10) and non-immigrant, non-Hispanic white women with type 2 diabetes (n=10) from the investigators' prior research were recruited to participate in this qualitative study. Guided by the Purnell Model for Cultural Competence, participants' health and lifestyle beliefs and behaviors were explored using a semi-structured questionnaire. Tape-recorded interviews were conducted in either Russian or English according to each participant's preference. All interviews were transcribed and translated, if necessary, to English. Each transcript was coded independently by three researchers. The researchers then compared coding and cross-validated findings. Emerging categories were noted and definitions for the categories were established. During ongoing analysis, data is being categorized using the initial codes with categories added as new information emerges. Prior interviews will be reanalyzed to determine whether similar information was overlooked and to ensure consistency. Eventually, categories will be finalized and merged into themes which will be conclusively defined. Exemplars will be selected to illustrate each theme.
Results: Data analysis is in progress with initial evidence suggesting that important differences exist in diabetes and cardiovascular self-care beliefs and behaviors among women immigrants from the former Soviet Union as compared to non-immigrant, non-Hispanic white women.
Implications: The research will provide data for tailoring and testing culturally appropriate diabetes self-management interventions among immigrants from the former Soviet Union. Funding: Washington State University-Spokane Seed Grant No. 9917.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCross Cultural Exploration of Diabetes Self-Care Beliefs and Behaviorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158004-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cross Cultural Exploration of Diabetes Self-Care Beliefs and Behaviors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Allen, Carol, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Intercollegiate College of Nursing, 2917 West Fort George Wright Drive, Spokane, WA, 99224, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">509-324-7262</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carola@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jill Armstrong Shultz, PhD, and Cynthia F. Corbett, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this research is to compare self-care beliefs and behaviors related to diabetes and cardiovascular disease among women immigrants from the former Soviet Union with non-immigrant, non-Hispanic white women. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Among people with diabetes, approximately 80% die from cardiovascular disease (CVD) and outcomes are less optimistic for women than men. CVD complications for people with type 2 diabetes can be delayed and/or reduced by tight blood pressure (BP) and lipid control. The majority of persons with diabetes in the United States have BP and lipid levels in excess of the recommended values. Unfortunately, immigrant clients' misinformation about disease and treatment and their cultural beliefs about health and nutrition, as well as language barriers and health providers' insufficient knowledge on how to best approach care and education for this understudied group, further interfere with optimal treatment. Pilot data from the investigators' prior research revealed that immigrants from the former Soviet Union had glycosylated A1C levels similar to their non-immigrant, non-Hispanic age and gender-matched counterparts, but significantly worse BP and lipid profiles. Methods: Soviet immigrant women with type 2 diabetes (n=10) and non-immigrant, non-Hispanic white women with type 2 diabetes (n=10) from the investigators' prior research were recruited to participate in this qualitative study. Guided by the Purnell Model for Cultural Competence, participants' health and lifestyle beliefs and behaviors were explored using a semi-structured questionnaire. Tape-recorded interviews were conducted in either Russian or English according to each participant's preference. All interviews were transcribed and translated, if necessary, to English. Each transcript was coded independently by three researchers. The researchers then compared coding and cross-validated findings. Emerging categories were noted and definitions for the categories were established. During ongoing analysis, data is being categorized using the initial codes with categories added as new information emerges. Prior interviews will be reanalyzed to determine whether similar information was overlooked and to ensure consistency. Eventually, categories will be finalized and merged into themes which will be conclusively defined. Exemplars will be selected to illustrate each theme. <br/>Results: Data analysis is in progress with initial evidence suggesting that important differences exist in diabetes and cardiovascular self-care beliefs and behaviors among women immigrants from the former Soviet Union as compared to non-immigrant, non-Hispanic white women.<br/>Implications: The research will provide data for tailoring and testing culturally appropriate diabetes self-management interventions among immigrants from the former Soviet Union. Funding: Washington State University-Spokane Seed Grant No. 9917.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:24:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:24:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.