2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158005
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Attributional Styles of Pregnant Women who Quit or Reduce Smoking
Abstract:
Attributional Styles of Pregnant Women who Quit or Reduce Smoking
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Alpert, Patricia, DrPH, MSN, APRN, BC, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada Las Vegas
Title:Asst Professor & Graduate Coordinator
Contact Address:School of Nursing #3018, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA
Contact Telephone:702-895-3810
Co-Authors:Roseann Colosimo, PhD, RN
Background: Researchers in the field of smoking have sought to identify variables that predict whether or not pregnant smokers stop or continue to smoke. Most variables examined are demographic in nature and little is known about psychological variables associated with those who quit or reduce smoking while pregnant. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze attributional style (optimism or pessimism) and locus of control to determine which factors alone, or in combination, are associated with quitting versus reducing smoking among pregnant women.
Sample: One hundred nine pregnant women who either quit (n=66) or reduced their smoking (n=43) by the eighth month of pregnancy participated in this study. Median age for quitters was 22 and the median age for reduced smokers was 26. The ethnic background of women in both groups was comprised of: Asians (quitters=1.5%, reduced smokers=0%), African Americans (quitters=25.8%, reduced smokers=15.9%), Hispanics (quitters=30.3%, reduced smokers=4.5%), Caucasians (quitters=37.9%, reduced smokers=75%), Native Americans (quitters=1.5%, reduced smokers=2.3%), other (quitters=1.5%, reduced smokers=0%). Methods: Participants were identified by the nursing staff at a women's county out-patient clinic in Las Vegas and interviewed by telephone between March 2002 and August 2004. Subjects completed measures of attributional styles and locus of control and smoking habits prior to and during pregnancy. The Beck Depression scale was administered to control for depression. Results: Both groups had similar attributional styles, which were pessimistic (below the midpoint of zero on the scale of -18 to +18). However, quitters were less pessimistic than reduced smokers (reduced smokers: -3.4, quitters: -1.7, p=<0.001). There were no differences in locus of control between the two groups, most in each group had internal locus of control. Compared to reduced smokers, quitters were less likely to live with a smoker (56.7% vs. 72.1%, p<0.001). More quitters stopped at <2 weeks (28.8%) or 1-2 months (40.9%) of being pregnant compared to reduced smokers who were more likely to change their smoking habits at 1-2 months (41.9%) or 3-4 months (37.2%) into pregnancy (p< 0001). There were no differences between groups on education, ethnicity, marital status, parity, or smoking prior to pregnancy. The Beck Depression scores correlated with smoking status showed smoking status was independent of depression ( X square =6.355, df=3, p=0.096).
Implications: Reduced smokers were more pessimistic, especially for internal causality for negative situations, which indicates a personality difference between groups. This suggests attribution therapy may be effective for encouraging reduced smokers to quit completely.
Partially funded by a grant from the Zeta Kappa Chapter, Sigma Theta Tau Nursing International Honor Society.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAttributional Styles of Pregnant Women who Quit or Reduce Smokingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158005-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Attributional Styles of Pregnant Women who Quit or Reduce Smoking</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Alpert, Patricia, DrPH, MSN, APRN, BC, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada Las Vegas</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Asst Professor &amp; Graduate Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing #3018, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">702-895-3810</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">patricia.alpert@unlv.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Roseann Colosimo, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Researchers in the field of smoking have sought to identify variables that predict whether or not pregnant smokers stop or continue to smoke. Most variables examined are demographic in nature and little is known about psychological variables associated with those who quit or reduce smoking while pregnant. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze attributional style (optimism or pessimism) and locus of control to determine which factors alone, or in combination, are associated with quitting versus reducing smoking among pregnant women.<br/>Sample: One hundred nine pregnant women who either quit (n=66) or reduced their smoking (n=43) by the eighth month of pregnancy participated in this study. Median age for quitters was 22 and the median age for reduced smokers was 26. The ethnic background of women in both groups was comprised of: Asians (quitters=1.5%, reduced smokers=0%), African Americans (quitters=25.8%, reduced smokers=15.9%), Hispanics (quitters=30.3%, reduced smokers=4.5%), Caucasians (quitters=37.9%, reduced smokers=75%), Native Americans (quitters=1.5%, reduced smokers=2.3%), other (quitters=1.5%, reduced smokers=0%). Methods: Participants were identified by the nursing staff at a women's county out-patient clinic in Las Vegas and interviewed by telephone between March 2002 and August 2004. Subjects completed measures of attributional styles and locus of control and smoking habits prior to and during pregnancy. The Beck Depression scale was administered to control for depression. Results: Both groups had similar attributional styles, which were pessimistic (below the midpoint of zero on the scale of -18 to +18). However, quitters were less pessimistic than reduced smokers (reduced smokers: -3.4, quitters: -1.7, p=&lt;0.001). There were no differences in locus of control between the two groups, most in each group had internal locus of control. Compared to reduced smokers, quitters were less likely to live with a smoker (56.7% vs. 72.1%, p&lt;0.001). More quitters stopped at &lt;2 weeks (28.8%) or 1-2 months (40.9%) of being pregnant compared to reduced smokers who were more likely to change their smoking habits at 1-2 months (41.9%) or 3-4 months (37.2%) into pregnancy (p&lt; 0001). There were no differences between groups on education, ethnicity, marital status, parity, or smoking prior to pregnancy. The Beck Depression scores correlated with smoking status showed smoking status was independent of depression ( X square =6.355, df=3, p=0.096).<br/>Implications: Reduced smokers were more pessimistic, especially for internal causality for negative situations, which indicates a personality difference between groups. This suggests attribution therapy may be effective for encouraging reduced smokers to quit completely. <br/>Partially funded by a grant from the Zeta Kappa Chapter, Sigma Theta Tau Nursing International Honor Society.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:24:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:24:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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