Dyadic Interdependence of Anxiety Among Women with Breast Cancer and Their Partner

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158006
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Dyadic Interdependence of Anxiety Among Women with Breast Cancer and Their Partner
Abstract:
Dyadic Interdependence of Anxiety Among Women with Breast Cancer and Their Partner
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Badger, Terry, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Arizona
Title:Professor
Contact Address:10774 N. Pomegranate Drive, Oro Valley, AZ, 85737, USA
Contact Telephone:520-626-6058
Co-Authors:Ana Maria Lopez, MD; Chris Segrin, PhD; and Sam Dorros
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore interdependence in anxiety on depression, fatigue and relationship satisfaction for women with breast cancer and their partners (N=190). Methods: The data for this paper were selected from a larger experimental study testing the effectiveness of a telephone counseling intervention. Ninety-five women with breast cancer and their 95 partners participated in the 3-wave longitudinal study over the course of 10 weeks. Women with breast cancer were typically white, middle-aged, and had a minimum of a high school education. The majority was Stage II and received a combination of chemotherapy, radiation or hormone-blocking therapies. Their partners were similar in demographic characteristics. QOL indicators (anxiety, depression, fatigue) and relationship satisfaction were measured in both women and their partners. Results: Women's anxiety correlated significantly with their partners' psychological distress over the course of the study (r=.39***, r=.35***, r=.42***). The partners' anxiety was associated with women's depression (ranges from .32 to .47***), physical fatigue (ranges from -.23 to -.26*), and mental fatigue (ranges from -.23 to -.28**). Further, women's anxiety was negatively correlated with partners' reports of relationship satisfaction at both T2 and T3, and partners' anxiety with women's relationship satisfaction at T2 and T3. Higher anxiety resulted in lowered relationship satisfaction. Analysis of rates and directions of change over the 10-week course of the investigation revealed that, for members of these close relationships, the experience of psychological distress was on a similar trajectory. Conclusions: There was strong construct stability for anxiety for both women and their partners. Anxious participants generally stayed anxious, and the partners' anxiety predicted T1-T2 changes and T2-T3 changes in women's anxiety. If the partners' anxiety was higher at T1 or T2, then the women's anxiety worsened over the course of the study. However, there is no evidence of this influence going from the women to their partners. Thus, it shows the importance for the partner to be included in interventions to decrease partner distress, and for a woman undergoing treatment for breast cancer to have a calm partner to enable that partner to provide needed support. Acknowledgement of Funding: NINR.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDyadic Interdependence of Anxiety Among Women with Breast Cancer and Their Partneren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158006-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Dyadic Interdependence of Anxiety Among Women with Breast Cancer and Their Partner</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Badger, Terry, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10774 N. Pomegranate Drive, Oro Valley, AZ, 85737, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520-626-6058</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tbadger@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ana Maria Lopez, MD; Chris Segrin, PhD; and Sam Dorros</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore interdependence in anxiety on depression, fatigue and relationship satisfaction for women with breast cancer and their partners (N=190). Methods: The data for this paper were selected from a larger experimental study testing the effectiveness of a telephone counseling intervention. Ninety-five women with breast cancer and their 95 partners participated in the 3-wave longitudinal study over the course of 10 weeks. Women with breast cancer were typically white, middle-aged, and had a minimum of a high school education. The majority was Stage II and received a combination of chemotherapy, radiation or hormone-blocking therapies. Their partners were similar in demographic characteristics. QOL indicators (anxiety, depression, fatigue) and relationship satisfaction were measured in both women and their partners. Results: Women's anxiety correlated significantly with their partners' psychological distress over the course of the study (r=.39***, r=.35***, r=.42***). The partners' anxiety was associated with women's depression (ranges from .32 to .47***), physical fatigue (ranges from -.23 to -.26*), and mental fatigue (ranges from -.23 to -.28**). Further, women's anxiety was negatively correlated with partners' reports of relationship satisfaction at both T2 and T3, and partners' anxiety with women's relationship satisfaction at T2 and T3. Higher anxiety resulted in lowered relationship satisfaction. Analysis of rates and directions of change over the 10-week course of the investigation revealed that, for members of these close relationships, the experience of psychological distress was on a similar trajectory. Conclusions: There was strong construct stability for anxiety for both women and their partners. Anxious participants generally stayed anxious, and the partners' anxiety predicted T1-T2 changes and T2-T3 changes in women's anxiety. If the partners' anxiety was higher at T1 or T2, then the women's anxiety worsened over the course of the study. However, there is no evidence of this influence going from the women to their partners. Thus, it shows the importance for the partner to be included in interventions to decrease partner distress, and for a woman undergoing treatment for breast cancer to have a calm partner to enable that partner to provide needed support. Acknowledgement of Funding: NINR.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:25:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:25:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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