2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158008
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cross-border Collaborative Research: Pilot Questionnaire Results from Montana
Abstract:
Cross-border Collaborative Research: Pilot Questionnaire Results from Montana
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Barnieh, Lianne, MSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Calgary
Title:Research Coordinator
Contact Address:Faculty of Nursing, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4, Canada
Contact Telephone:403-220-6263
Co-Authors:Dana S. Edge, RN, PhD
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test a questionnaire designed by nursing collaborators in Canada and Montana to survey rural health professionals regarding attitudes towards and use of research findings in practice. Background: Studies exist on research utilization amongst nurses in a variety of urban settings. Yet, to date, minimal information exists on the availability or applicability of health research in rural and remote settings in North America. Permission was granted from two sets of researchers to modify existing research utilization tools (Estabrooks & Chong, 2003; McKenna, Ashton & Keeney, 2004 ). For the purposes of this investigation, rural was defined as towns less than 10,000 people outside the commuting zone to a major urban area (duPleiss, Beshiri & Bollman, 2001). Methods: Ethical approval was granted at both University of Calgary and Montana State University. Questionnaire development occurred via electronic mail and teleconferences. Random sampling of 100 rural nurses obtained from a Montana Board of Nursing database was completed by researchers in Alberta, with the mail-out of the questionnaire and accompanying cover letter occurring on February 16, 2005. Two weeks later, a thank you/reminder postcard was sent to all participants. At four weeks, a replacement questionnaire with accompanying letter was sent to those who had not yet responded. The response rate was 61 percent (n=53), with 14 mailings classified as out-of-scope. Data were entered into ACCESS with descriptive and reliability statistics carried out using SPSS v.13¬. Results: Cronbach's alpha for the modified 19-items about the sources of practice knowledge ranged from 0.84 to 0.86 for all Likert scaled items. Reliability for the 26-item section on barriers to research utilization extended from 0.64 to 0.73. Several insights about the initial questionnaire emerged: a) a workplace zip code should be requested to accurately identify if nurses worked in a "rural" community; b) several sections required re-wording; and, c) differing versions of the questionnaire tailored for other health care practitioners were necessary. Though the findings from the survey cannot be generalized to all rural Montana nurses, interesting findings were uncovered. Overall, respondents ranked personal knowing, experience and intuition higher for guiding practice than research; this was particularly true for nurses older than 50 years if the research contradicted intuition (chi square =9.43, p=0.02). Implications: Through the use of teleconferences and e-mail, the cross-border research team succeeded in piloting a research utilization questionnaire among rural Montana nurses. Results from the pilot study supplement qualitative findings and assisted in the refinement of the questionnaire for use in a Canadian study of health care professionals. References: duPleiss, V., Beshiri, R., & Bollman, R.D. (2001). Definitions of rural. Rural & Small Town Canada Analysis Bulletin, 3(3), 1-17. Estabrooks, C.A., & Chong, H. (2003). Alberta nurse survey technical report. Edmonton: Knowledge Utilization Studies in Practice. McKenna, H.P., Ashton, S., & Keeney, S. (2004). Barriers to evidence-based practice in primary care. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 45(2), 178-189.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCross-border Collaborative Research: Pilot Questionnaire Results from Montanaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158008-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cross-border Collaborative Research: Pilot Questionnaire Results from Montana</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Barnieh, Lianne, MSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Calgary</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Faculty of Nursing, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">403-220-6263</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lbarnieh@shaw.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Dana S. Edge, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test a questionnaire designed by nursing collaborators in Canada and Montana to survey rural health professionals regarding attitudes towards and use of research findings in practice. Background: Studies exist on research utilization amongst nurses in a variety of urban settings. Yet, to date, minimal information exists on the availability or applicability of health research in rural and remote settings in North America. Permission was granted from two sets of researchers to modify existing research utilization tools (Estabrooks &amp; Chong, 2003; McKenna, Ashton &amp; Keeney, 2004 ). For the purposes of this investigation, rural was defined as towns less than 10,000 people outside the commuting zone to a major urban area (duPleiss, Beshiri &amp; Bollman, 2001). Methods: Ethical approval was granted at both University of Calgary and Montana State University. Questionnaire development occurred via electronic mail and teleconferences. Random sampling of 100 rural nurses obtained from a Montana Board of Nursing database was completed by researchers in Alberta, with the mail-out of the questionnaire and accompanying cover letter occurring on February 16, 2005. Two weeks later, a thank you/reminder postcard was sent to all participants. At four weeks, a replacement questionnaire with accompanying letter was sent to those who had not yet responded. The response rate was 61 percent (n=53), with 14 mailings classified as out-of-scope. Data were entered into ACCESS with descriptive and reliability statistics carried out using SPSS v.13&not;. Results: Cronbach's alpha for the modified 19-items about the sources of practice knowledge ranged from 0.84 to 0.86 for all Likert scaled items. Reliability for the 26-item section on barriers to research utilization extended from 0.64 to 0.73. Several insights about the initial questionnaire emerged: a) a workplace zip code should be requested to accurately identify if nurses worked in a &quot;rural&quot; community; b) several sections required re-wording; and, c) differing versions of the questionnaire tailored for other health care practitioners were necessary. Though the findings from the survey cannot be generalized to all rural Montana nurses, interesting findings were uncovered. Overall, respondents ranked personal knowing, experience and intuition higher for guiding practice than research; this was particularly true for nurses older than 50 years if the research contradicted intuition (chi square =9.43, p=0.02). Implications: Through the use of teleconferences and e-mail, the cross-border research team succeeded in piloting a research utilization questionnaire among rural Montana nurses. Results from the pilot study supplement qualitative findings and assisted in the refinement of the questionnaire for use in a Canadian study of health care professionals. References: duPleiss, V., Beshiri, R., &amp; Bollman, R.D. (2001). Definitions of rural. Rural &amp; Small Town Canada Analysis Bulletin, 3(3), 1-17. Estabrooks, C.A., &amp; Chong, H. (2003). Alberta nurse survey technical report. Edmonton: Knowledge Utilization Studies in Practice. McKenna, H.P., Ashton, S., &amp; Keeney, S. (2004). Barriers to evidence-based practice in primary care. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 45(2), 178-189.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:25:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:25:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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