2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158009
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Regimen Complexity and Cognitive Function on Adherence
Abstract:
Effects of Regimen Complexity and Cognitive Function on Adherence
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Bauer, Melinda
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona
Title:Honors Undergraduate Student
Contact Address:4540 N. Homestead Avenue, Tucson, AZ, 85749, USA
Contact Telephone:520-626-6220
Co-Authors:Kathleen C. Insel, PhD, RN
Background: This study investigated the effects of regimen complexity and cognitive function on medication adherence. Medication adherence is an important self-care activity, yet it is estimated that adherence rates for individuals with chronic conditions is between 48 - 78% (Osterberg & Blacschke, 2005). Regimen complexity and cognitive function have been shown to influence medication adherence (Claxton, Cramer, & Pierce, 2001; Insel, Morrow, Brewer, & Figueredo, In press). At least one investigation demonstrated an interaction between regimen complexity and cognitive function on adherence (Hinkin et al., 2002). Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to examine the influence of regimen complexity and cognitive function in an existing data set. Methods: The sample was composed of 99 community dwelling older adults (67-93 years) who were taking at least one daily prescribed medication typical to older adult populations such as anti-hypertensives, lipid lowering medications, and anti-arthritics. Adherence was measured using electronic medication monitoring caps that recorded the date and time the cap was opened over an 8 week period. Cognitive function was measured using both the Mini Mental State Exam and the Executive Interview (EXIT25).
Results: Findings indicate that, when examined alone, regimen complexity was significantly associated with adherence to medication (p < .05). When analyzed with the Mini Mental State Exam, regimen complexity continues to be significantly associated with adherence (p <.05). However, when a measure of executive function is used, regimen complexity is no longer significantly associated with adherence; rather executive function is significantly associated with adherence (p < .05). Implications: This finding suggests executive function accounts for the association between regimen complexity and adherence. Therefore, regimen complexity may be less a factor for individuals with higher scores on assessments of executive function.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Regimen Complexity and Cognitive Function on Adherenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158009-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Regimen Complexity and Cognitive Function on Adherence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bauer, Melinda</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Honors Undergraduate Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4540 N. Homestead Avenue, Tucson, AZ, 85749, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520-626-6220</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mbauer@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathleen C. Insel, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: This study investigated the effects of regimen complexity and cognitive function on medication adherence. Medication adherence is an important self-care activity, yet it is estimated that adherence rates for individuals with chronic conditions is between 48 - 78% (Osterberg &amp; Blacschke, 2005). Regimen complexity and cognitive function have been shown to influence medication adherence (Claxton, Cramer, &amp; Pierce, 2001; Insel, Morrow, Brewer, &amp; Figueredo, In press). At least one investigation demonstrated an interaction between regimen complexity and cognitive function on adherence (Hinkin et al., 2002). Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to examine the influence of regimen complexity and cognitive function in an existing data set. Methods: The sample was composed of 99 community dwelling older adults (67-93 years) who were taking at least one daily prescribed medication typical to older adult populations such as anti-hypertensives, lipid lowering medications, and anti-arthritics. Adherence was measured using electronic medication monitoring caps that recorded the date and time the cap was opened over an 8 week period. Cognitive function was measured using both the Mini Mental State Exam and the Executive Interview (EXIT25). <br/>Results: Findings indicate that, when examined alone, regimen complexity was significantly associated with adherence to medication (p &lt; .05). When analyzed with the Mini Mental State Exam, regimen complexity continues to be significantly associated with adherence (p &lt;.05). However, when a measure of executive function is used, regimen complexity is no longer significantly associated with adherence; rather executive function is significantly associated with adherence (p &lt; .05). Implications: This finding suggests executive function accounts for the association between regimen complexity and adherence. Therefore, regimen complexity may be less a factor for individuals with higher scores on assessments of executive function.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:25:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:25:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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