2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158010
Type:
Presentation
Title:
One Gets So Afraid: Concerns of Latino Parents with Children Who Have Asthma
Abstract:
One Gets So Afraid: Concerns of Latino Parents with Children Who Have Asthma
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Berg, Jill, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, Los Angeles
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 4-254 Factor Building, Tiverton, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA
Contact Telephone:310-794-5835
Co-Authors:Nancy L.R. Anderson, PhD, RN, C-ANP; and Marcy Tichacek, RN, MN, CS, BC
Parents with children with asthma are often frightened and burdened by their child's chronic illness. In addition to the physical changes that must be made for management of the disease, there is the emotional toll of having a child with an unpredictable chronic illness. The difficulty in managing childhood asthma is even more problematic for Latino immigrant families. In part because of lack of health insurance and financial resources, Latino children with asthma are at increased risk for receiving inadequate medical supervision of chronic symptoms. Latino families face childhood asthma as a common, sometimes fatal chronic illness, while attempting to manage the illness with limited resources. The community based Vulnerable Populations Model provided the framework for this study. Key concepts in the model are resource availability, relative risk, health status, and vulnerable populations. Purpose: This study explored Latino family experiences in caring for a child with asthma.
Methods: Eight families represented by 7 women and 2 men, primarily of Mexican descent, participated in the study. The study employed an exploratory design, based on ethnographic group and individual interview techniques, as the most appropriate approach to discover the parents' initial experiences with managing their child's asthma and the meaning asthma has for their families. We selected this qualitative approach to learn the parents' perspectives. Results: Group and individual in-depth interviews conducted in homes or community settings focused on needs and barriers to both health care and asthma information. Participants confirmed themes during subsequent meetings. The overall finding was that parents were extremely fearful and emotional about their child's asthma. Additional findings included concerns about a) the cost of care and lack of financial resources, b) communication problems with non-Spanish speaking medical personnel, and c) day to day management of childhood asthma. Conclusions/Implications: Latino families of children with asthma need more opportunities for asthma education, resources such as better health care networks, and Spanish-speaking personnel in the health care setting. The findings of this study suggest additional areas for further research. This study was supported by a grant from NIH/NINR, P30 NR005041.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOne Gets So Afraid: Concerns of Latino Parents with Children Who Have Asthmaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158010-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">One Gets So Afraid: Concerns of Latino Parents with Children Who Have Asthma</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Berg, Jill, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, Los Angeles</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 4-254 Factor Building, Tiverton, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">310-794-5835</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jberg@sonnet.ucla.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nancy L.R. Anderson, PhD, RN, C-ANP; and Marcy Tichacek, RN, MN, CS, BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Parents with children with asthma are often frightened and burdened by their child's chronic illness. In addition to the physical changes that must be made for management of the disease, there is the emotional toll of having a child with an unpredictable chronic illness. The difficulty in managing childhood asthma is even more problematic for Latino immigrant families. In part because of lack of health insurance and financial resources, Latino children with asthma are at increased risk for receiving inadequate medical supervision of chronic symptoms. Latino families face childhood asthma as a common, sometimes fatal chronic illness, while attempting to manage the illness with limited resources. The community based Vulnerable Populations Model provided the framework for this study. Key concepts in the model are resource availability, relative risk, health status, and vulnerable populations. Purpose: This study explored Latino family experiences in caring for a child with asthma.<br/>Methods: Eight families represented by 7 women and 2 men, primarily of Mexican descent, participated in the study. The study employed an exploratory design, based on ethnographic group and individual interview techniques, as the most appropriate approach to discover the parents' initial experiences with managing their child's asthma and the meaning asthma has for their families. We selected this qualitative approach to learn the parents' perspectives. Results: Group and individual in-depth interviews conducted in homes or community settings focused on needs and barriers to both health care and asthma information. Participants confirmed themes during subsequent meetings. The overall finding was that parents were extremely fearful and emotional about their child's asthma. Additional findings included concerns about a) the cost of care and lack of financial resources, b) communication problems with non-Spanish speaking medical personnel, and c) day to day management of childhood asthma. Conclusions/Implications: Latino families of children with asthma need more opportunities for asthma education, resources such as better health care networks, and Spanish-speaking personnel in the health care setting. The findings of this study suggest additional areas for further research. This study was supported by a grant from NIH/NINR, P30 NR005041.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:25:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:25:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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