2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158012
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient Perceptions of Care Delivered by Nurses with HIV
Abstract:
Patient Perceptions of Care Delivered by Nurses with HIV
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Black, Lisa, MS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of California-San Francisco
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:1856 Millpond Court, Reno, NV, 89523, USA
Contact Telephone:775-747-1909
Purpose: The purposes of this study were to (1) describe the perceptions of hospitalized surgical patients toward nursing care delivered by a nurse infected with HIV, (2) determine if age, gender, educational status, and knowing a person with HIV influenced the client perceptions of care delivered by an HIV+ nurse, and (3) determine if hospitalized surgical patients perceived a right to disclosure of the HIV status of the nurse caring for them. Background: Reported cases of transmission of HIV from health care workers to patients have created an ethical and legal quandary of whether HIV+ healthcare workers should provide direct care to patients and to whom they must disclose their HIV status. While much attention has been paid to policy level regulation of the practice of nurses with HIV, little research has explored patient perceptions of care delivered by HIV-infected nurses. This study utilized Imogene King's Interacting Systems Conceptual Framework and Theory of Goal Attainment as its organizing structure. Evidence to support the theory is presented in the data. Methods: A convenience sample of 54 hospitalized surgical patients from a 500 bed acute care hospital was recruited to participate in this study. All participants were English speaking, over the age of 18, free of cognitive deficit as measured by the MMSE, and had undergone surgical intervention within 30 days of data collection. Written consent and institutional IRB approval were obtained prior to data collection. Descriptive statistics of patient perceptions of being cared for by an HIV+ nurse were examined. Multiple regression analysis was calculated to determine the effect of age, gender, educational level, and knowing a person with HIV on perception of care delivered by an HIV+ nurse. Results: Total patient scores, as measured by the sum of responses to the 10 item, five-point Likert scaled, "Client Perceptions of the HIV+ Nurse" questionnaire, ranged from 10 (the lowest possible score) to a high of 40 (the highest possible score) (M = 25.00, SD = 9.67). Participant level of concern increased as the level of invasiveness of the care modality increased, although 11% (n=6) of the respondents would not allow a nurse with HIV to provide any level of care to them. Stepwise multiple regression analysis of the combined effects of these three variables yielded an adjusted R2 = 0.716, suggesting that 71.6% of the variance in scores was explained by the participant's age, educational status, and whether or not the participant knew a person with HIV. 70.4% of participants indicated a moderate to strong desire to be informed of the HIV status of their nurse. Conclusions/Implications: This study provides evidence that the hospitalized surgical patients in this sample were concerned about being cared for by nurses with HIV/AIDS. Through consideration of this and future research examining patient perceptions of the presence of HIV-infected nurses in direct-care roles, policy makers, ethicists, nursing leaders, and individual nurses can begin to resolve the legal, ethical, and moral dilemmas that exist when attempting to balance the rights of the nurse to practice unimpeded and the wishes of the patient to be informed and avoid perceived risk.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient Perceptions of Care Delivered by Nurses with HIVen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158012-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patient Perceptions of Care Delivered by Nurses with HIV</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Black, Lisa, MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California-San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1856 Millpond Court, Reno, NV, 89523, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">775-747-1909</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purposes of this study were to (1) describe the perceptions of hospitalized surgical patients toward nursing care delivered by a nurse infected with HIV, (2) determine if age, gender, educational status, and knowing a person with HIV influenced the client perceptions of care delivered by an HIV+ nurse, and (3) determine if hospitalized surgical patients perceived a right to disclosure of the HIV status of the nurse caring for them. Background: Reported cases of transmission of HIV from health care workers to patients have created an ethical and legal quandary of whether HIV+ healthcare workers should provide direct care to patients and to whom they must disclose their HIV status. While much attention has been paid to policy level regulation of the practice of nurses with HIV, little research has explored patient perceptions of care delivered by HIV-infected nurses. This study utilized Imogene King's Interacting Systems Conceptual Framework and Theory of Goal Attainment as its organizing structure. Evidence to support the theory is presented in the data. Methods: A convenience sample of 54 hospitalized surgical patients from a 500 bed acute care hospital was recruited to participate in this study. All participants were English speaking, over the age of 18, free of cognitive deficit as measured by the MMSE, and had undergone surgical intervention within 30 days of data collection. Written consent and institutional IRB approval were obtained prior to data collection. Descriptive statistics of patient perceptions of being cared for by an HIV+ nurse were examined. Multiple regression analysis was calculated to determine the effect of age, gender, educational level, and knowing a person with HIV on perception of care delivered by an HIV+ nurse. Results: Total patient scores, as measured by the sum of responses to the 10 item, five-point Likert scaled, &quot;Client Perceptions of the HIV+ Nurse&quot; questionnaire, ranged from 10 (the lowest possible score) to a high of 40 (the highest possible score) (M = 25.00, SD = 9.67). Participant level of concern increased as the level of invasiveness of the care modality increased, although 11% (n=6) of the respondents would not allow a nurse with HIV to provide any level of care to them. Stepwise multiple regression analysis of the combined effects of these three variables yielded an adjusted R2 = 0.716, suggesting that 71.6% of the variance in scores was explained by the participant's age, educational status, and whether or not the participant knew a person with HIV. 70.4% of participants indicated a moderate to strong desire to be informed of the HIV status of their nurse. Conclusions/Implications: This study provides evidence that the hospitalized surgical patients in this sample were concerned about being cared for by nurses with HIV/AIDS. Through consideration of this and future research examining patient perceptions of the presence of HIV-infected nurses in direct-care roles, policy makers, ethicists, nursing leaders, and individual nurses can begin to resolve the legal, ethical, and moral dilemmas that exist when attempting to balance the rights of the nurse to practice unimpeded and the wishes of the patient to be informed and avoid perceived risk.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:25:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:25:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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