9.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158013
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cognitive Interviewing Approach to Insure Instrument Equivalence
Abstract:
Cognitive Interviewing Approach to Insure Instrument Equivalence
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Borges, Wanda, DSN, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:New Mexico State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:2020 Gladys Drive, Las Cruces, NM, 88001, USA
Contact Telephone:505-646-2111
Co-Authors:Graham McDougall, PhD
Background: Diabetes self-management education to improve self-care behaviors in patients with diabetes has proven to be successful but most of the education, with some notable exceptions, has been developed for use in Caucasian populations. Adding to the problem of the sparsity of culturally appropriate interventions is the lack of outcome measures of diabetes self-care behaviors and psychosocial factors affecting behaviors available in Spanish that have been tested in Hispanic populations. Simply translating an instrument into Spanish is not enough; to determine the effectiveness of intervention programs, valid and reliable measurement instruments must be used. Findings from a study by Rosal, Carbone & Goins (2003) indicated that some commonly used measures, though reported as reliable in a Spanish speaking population, were not equivalent for Caribbean origin participants. While no best practice or standardized model for translation of instruments to insure equivalence was found in the literature, guidelines are offered in several textbooks with recommended procedures. All sources recommend multi-stage procedures. Another recommendation is to incorporate a pre-test of the instrument prior to pilot testing that uses cognitive interviewing. Cognitive interviewing, widely used in pre-testing survey instruments like the US census, elicits thoughts, feelings, interpretations and ideas that come to mind when survey questions are posed. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to use cognitive interviewing techniques to refine measurement instruments of diabetes self-care behaviors, diabetes self-efficacy and depression in English and Spanish to insure equivalence of meaning in a primarily Mexican-American US-Mexico border community population. Sample: A total of 20 Mexican-American adults, age > 40, with type 2 diabetes will be recruited to participate in the study. Ten participants will be bilingual Spanish and English and ten participants will be monolingual Spanish speaking. Methods: Words and phrases that require further examination based on use in previous studies were identified and a protocol that guides the interview process was developed by the PI. Based on this protocol, following think aloud techniques, interviewers will use probing as participants answer questions to further clarify meanings and answers given. This guide will also serve to provide a framework for qualitative analysis of the interview content. Wording of the questionnaire will then be modified based on this analysis and participants' specific wording suggestions. The cognitive interview technique will then be used with the modified version. Data Analysis: Immediately after each interview session, interviewers will write notes regarding the interview directly on a questionnaire master noting which participant interview the note is about. The interviews will be audiotaped and transcribed; those in Spanish will be transcribed into Spanish and translated into English. The transcripts and handwritten notes of the first round of interviews will be reviewed by the PI and Co-PI using an analysis framework. Data will be reviewed and content analyzed to identify common themes or patterns about the understanding of questionnaire items in the data. Descriptive statistics will be used to analyze demographic data, to include frequencies or mean summary statistics, as appropriate, on all variables. Conclusions: It is anticipated that, at the completion of this pilot study, instruments that measure diabetes self-care behaviors, diabetes self-efficacy and depression that are culturally and literacy level appropriate for a primarily Mexican-American border community will be produced. Funding: California HealthCare Foundation (99-5041A) and NIA, UCLA D. Claude Pepper Older Americans Independence Center (AG 10415).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCognitive Interviewing Approach to Insure Instrument Equivalenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158013-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cognitive Interviewing Approach to Insure Instrument Equivalence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Borges, Wanda, DSN, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">New Mexico State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2020 Gladys Drive, Las Cruces, NM, 88001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-646-2111</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wjborges@nmsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Graham McDougall, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Diabetes self-management education to improve self-care behaviors in patients with diabetes has proven to be successful but most of the education, with some notable exceptions, has been developed for use in Caucasian populations. Adding to the problem of the sparsity of culturally appropriate interventions is the lack of outcome measures of diabetes self-care behaviors and psychosocial factors affecting behaviors available in Spanish that have been tested in Hispanic populations. Simply translating an instrument into Spanish is not enough; to determine the effectiveness of intervention programs, valid and reliable measurement instruments must be used. Findings from a study by Rosal, Carbone &amp; Goins (2003) indicated that some commonly used measures, though reported as reliable in a Spanish speaking population, were not equivalent for Caribbean origin participants. While no best practice or standardized model for translation of instruments to insure equivalence was found in the literature, guidelines are offered in several textbooks with recommended procedures. All sources recommend multi-stage procedures. Another recommendation is to incorporate a pre-test of the instrument prior to pilot testing that uses cognitive interviewing. Cognitive interviewing, widely used in pre-testing survey instruments like the US census, elicits thoughts, feelings, interpretations and ideas that come to mind when survey questions are posed. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to use cognitive interviewing techniques to refine measurement instruments of diabetes self-care behaviors, diabetes self-efficacy and depression in English and Spanish to insure equivalence of meaning in a primarily Mexican-American US-Mexico border community population. Sample: A total of 20 Mexican-American adults, age &gt; 40, with type 2 diabetes will be recruited to participate in the study. Ten participants will be bilingual Spanish and English and ten participants will be monolingual Spanish speaking. Methods: Words and phrases that require further examination based on use in previous studies were identified and a protocol that guides the interview process was developed by the PI. Based on this protocol, following think aloud techniques, interviewers will use probing as participants answer questions to further clarify meanings and answers given. This guide will also serve to provide a framework for qualitative analysis of the interview content. Wording of the questionnaire will then be modified based on this analysis and participants' specific wording suggestions. The cognitive interview technique will then be used with the modified version. Data Analysis: Immediately after each interview session, interviewers will write notes regarding the interview directly on a questionnaire master noting which participant interview the note is about. The interviews will be audiotaped and transcribed; those in Spanish will be transcribed into Spanish and translated into English. The transcripts and handwritten notes of the first round of interviews will be reviewed by the PI and Co-PI using an analysis framework. Data will be reviewed and content analyzed to identify common themes or patterns about the understanding of questionnaire items in the data. Descriptive statistics will be used to analyze demographic data, to include frequencies or mean summary statistics, as appropriate, on all variables. Conclusions: It is anticipated that, at the completion of this pilot study, instruments that measure diabetes self-care behaviors, diabetes self-efficacy and depression that are culturally and literacy level appropriate for a primarily Mexican-American border community will be produced. Funding: California HealthCare Foundation (99-5041A) and NIA, UCLA D. Claude Pepper Older Americans Independence Center (AG 10415).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:25:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:25:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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