2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158015
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emotional Regulation in Children and Aggressive Behavior
Abstract:
Emotional Regulation in Children and Aggressive Behavior
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Bowie, Bonnie, RN, PhC, MBA
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:15204 NE 6th Place, Bellevue, WA, 98007, USA
Contact Telephone:206-543-2969
Co-Authors:Sybil Carr?re, PhD; Chelsea Siler, BS; Stephanie Jones, BS; and Cheryl Beardslee, BA
Purpose: This research looks at the associations between girls' and boys' emotional regulation, relational aggression and overt aggressive behaviors. Rationale: Children's ability to regulate their emotional responses to stressful situations are associated with their ability to interpret social cues from their peers and respond in a socially acceptable manner. When children misinterpret social interactions, they may respond with aggressive behavior. Historically, aggression has been measured as overt actions such as pushing or hitting and is associated more often with boys. However, recent research has identified relational aggression, a form of aggression that uses social relationships as a means of harming others, as a measure of aggression that is more typically observed in girls. This study assesses whether a child's ability to manage his or her anger is associated with different types of aggressive behaviors and gender. Methods: Children in middle childhood (6-11 years old) were interviewed about their experience of anger, including their perception of the length and intensity of anger they normally experience. Relational aggression was rated by the children's teachers using the Crick Child Interaction Scale (CCIS) (Crick & Grotpeter, 1995). Subscales from the CCIS were used to measure direct relational aggression using statements such as, "telling friends s/he will stop liking them unless friends do what s/he says" and indirect relational aggression using statements such as, "child tries to keep certain people from being in their group during activity or play time". Overt aggressive behaviors reported by the teachers (Behavior Assessment System for Children; Reynolds & Richmond, 1985). Results: The length of anger experienced by the children was positively correlated with teachers' reports of the children's direct relational aggression for girls, but not for boys. Conversely, the length of anger reported by the children was positively correlated with teachers' reports of overt aggression for boys, but not for girls. Length of anger was not correlated with indirect relational aggression for either boys or girls. Intensity of anger was not correlated with any of the measures of aggression. Implications: Children who are unable to regulate their emotions may be more likely to react to social interactions aggressively. When testing for aggressive behaviors, it is important to include measures that will capture gender differences in children. Traditional measures of overt aggression can miss an entire range of aggressive behaviors that are typically associated with girls. Funding: National Institute of Mental Health (MH42484); National Institute for Nursing Research (#2P30 NR04001; National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (P30 HD02274); Women's Health Nursing Research Training Grant through the Center for Women's Health Research (T32 NR07039), and the National Institute of Drug Abuse Research Training Grant (T32 DAO7257-14).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmotional Regulation in Children and Aggressive Behavioren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158015-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Emotional Regulation in Children and Aggressive Behavior</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bowie, Bonnie, RN, PhC, MBA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">15204 NE 6th Place, Bellevue, WA, 98007, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-543-2969</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bonbowie@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sybil Carr?re, PhD; Chelsea Siler, BS; Stephanie Jones, BS; and Cheryl Beardslee, BA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This research looks at the associations between girls' and boys' emotional regulation, relational aggression and overt aggressive behaviors. Rationale: Children's ability to regulate their emotional responses to stressful situations are associated with their ability to interpret social cues from their peers and respond in a socially acceptable manner. When children misinterpret social interactions, they may respond with aggressive behavior. Historically, aggression has been measured as overt actions such as pushing or hitting and is associated more often with boys. However, recent research has identified relational aggression, a form of aggression that uses social relationships as a means of harming others, as a measure of aggression that is more typically observed in girls. This study assesses whether a child's ability to manage his or her anger is associated with different types of aggressive behaviors and gender. Methods: Children in middle childhood (6-11 years old) were interviewed about their experience of anger, including their perception of the length and intensity of anger they normally experience. Relational aggression was rated by the children's teachers using the Crick Child Interaction Scale (CCIS) (Crick &amp; Grotpeter, 1995). Subscales from the CCIS were used to measure direct relational aggression using statements such as, &quot;telling friends s/he will stop liking them unless friends do what s/he says&quot; and indirect relational aggression using statements such as, &quot;child tries to keep certain people from being in their group during activity or play time&quot;. Overt aggressive behaviors reported by the teachers (Behavior Assessment System for Children; Reynolds &amp; Richmond, 1985). Results: The length of anger experienced by the children was positively correlated with teachers' reports of the children's direct relational aggression for girls, but not for boys. Conversely, the length of anger reported by the children was positively correlated with teachers' reports of overt aggression for boys, but not for girls. Length of anger was not correlated with indirect relational aggression for either boys or girls. Intensity of anger was not correlated with any of the measures of aggression. Implications: Children who are unable to regulate their emotions may be more likely to react to social interactions aggressively. When testing for aggressive behaviors, it is important to include measures that will capture gender differences in children. Traditional measures of overt aggression can miss an entire range of aggressive behaviors that are typically associated with girls. Funding: National Institute of Mental Health (MH42484); National Institute for Nursing Research (#2P30 NR04001; National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (P30 HD02274); Women's Health Nursing Research Training Grant through the Center for Women's Health Research (T32 NR07039), and the National Institute of Drug Abuse Research Training Grant (T32 DAO7257-14).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:25:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:25:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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