2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158016
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Wartime Competencies for the USAF Nurse: Training for Sustainment
Abstract:
Wartime Competencies for the USAF Nurse: Training for Sustainment
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Bridges, Elizabeth, PhD, RN, CCNS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Contact Telephone:206-543-6250
Co-Authors:Amanda Flagg, Maj USAF NC (Ret), Doctoral Candidate; and Ann Hakenson, Lt Col USAF NC
Flight Commander
Purpose/Aims: The purpose was to describe the clinical readiness of USAF nurses to provide operational care using a simulation lab, self-assessment and cognitive exam. Rationale/Background: The USAF Medical Service is challenged to provide worldwide operational health care. To meet this challenge, it is essential that military nurses be prepared so they can respond to any contingency. This research, which used a state-of-the-art Human Patient Simulator (METI), was designed to develop critical thinking skills and clinical judgment with a goal of increasing the clinical readiness of military nurses. Methods: All active duty nurses assigned to a 59th Medical Wing, Lackland AFB who were eligible for deployment as a medical-surgical nurse were eligible. A lab was built to house an HPS and simulate a military field hospital. A three hour training lab was completed with four scenarios (airway management, orthopedic and cervical spine injury, head trauma, hemorrhagic shock, bomb blast injury, and thermal burn). Teams of nurses (2-4/team) performed a systematic evaluation, developed, implemented and evaluated a plan of care. Education was provided by expert nurses who used standardized scenarios and educational techniques to develop critical thinking skills. A criterion-referenced exam and self-assessment was completed after the lab. 154/205 eligible nurses (75%) completed the lab training. Performance (without additional assistance from an instructor) and self-assessment was evaluated in a subset of nurses (n = 33) in 14 teams at 6 or 12 months post-training. Based on the psychometric properties of the Phase I cognitive exam and feedback from Iraq/Afghanistan, the exam was modified (109-items). 60 nurses who had not participated in the simulation labs completed the exam. Results: The results of Phase II (6/12 month follow-up and modified cognitive exam) are presented. There was no difference in performance between 6 and 12 months; thus data were combined. Education regarding triage can be provided annually, with an increased focus on the trajectory of care relative to available medical capabilities. Education and training related to specific care scenarios (orthopedic injuries, bomb blast injuries, shock, burns) needs to be accomplished every six months. The training should have two components (use of field equipment and field response: no equipment with limited supplies). There was discordance between self-assessment and actual performance. For all scenarios, self-assessment overestimated actual performance. Average score on the cognitive exam was 60 ñ 8% (similar to Phase I). Test areas scoring lowest/highest were identified. Discordance between knowledge and performance on certain skills was identified (e.g., C-spine control - 93% correct on exam; 10% correct performance in lab). Implications: This study was the first systematic evaluation of the readiness of Air Force nurses. The injury patterns evaluated match current real-world requirements. The results demonstrate the limitations of self-assessment as an indicator of actual performance. The training scenarios/evaluation tool and the cognitive exam booklet (test, answers, rationale and references) were distributed to all Air Force facilities and made available throughout the DoD on a training website. The results have informed current AF readiness training.
Funding Support: TriService Nursing Research Program.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWartime Competencies for the USAF Nurse: Training for Sustainmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158016-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Wartime Competencies for the USAF Nurse: Training for Sustainment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bridges, Elizabeth, PhD, RN, CCNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-543-6250</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ebridges@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Amanda Flagg, Maj USAF NC (Ret), Doctoral Candidate; and Ann Hakenson, Lt Col USAF NC<br/>Flight Commander</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose was to describe the clinical readiness of USAF nurses to provide operational care using a simulation lab, self-assessment and cognitive exam. Rationale/Background: The USAF Medical Service is challenged to provide worldwide operational health care. To meet this challenge, it is essential that military nurses be prepared so they can respond to any contingency. This research, which used a state-of-the-art Human Patient Simulator (METI), was designed to develop critical thinking skills and clinical judgment with a goal of increasing the clinical readiness of military nurses. Methods: All active duty nurses assigned to a 59th Medical Wing, Lackland AFB who were eligible for deployment as a medical-surgical nurse were eligible. A lab was built to house an HPS and simulate a military field hospital. A three hour training lab was completed with four scenarios (airway management, orthopedic and cervical spine injury, head trauma, hemorrhagic shock, bomb blast injury, and thermal burn). Teams of nurses (2-4/team) performed a systematic evaluation, developed, implemented and evaluated a plan of care. Education was provided by expert nurses who used standardized scenarios and educational techniques to develop critical thinking skills. A criterion-referenced exam and self-assessment was completed after the lab. 154/205 eligible nurses (75%) completed the lab training. Performance (without additional assistance from an instructor) and self-assessment was evaluated in a subset of nurses (n = 33) in 14 teams at 6 or 12 months post-training. Based on the psychometric properties of the Phase I cognitive exam and feedback from Iraq/Afghanistan, the exam was modified (109-items). 60 nurses who had not participated in the simulation labs completed the exam. Results: The results of Phase II (6/12 month follow-up and modified cognitive exam) are presented. There was no difference in performance between 6 and 12 months; thus data were combined. Education regarding triage can be provided annually, with an increased focus on the trajectory of care relative to available medical capabilities. Education and training related to specific care scenarios (orthopedic injuries, bomb blast injuries, shock, burns) needs to be accomplished every six months. The training should have two components (use of field equipment and field response: no equipment with limited supplies). There was discordance between self-assessment and actual performance. For all scenarios, self-assessment overestimated actual performance. Average score on the cognitive exam was 60 &ntilde; 8% (similar to Phase I). Test areas scoring lowest/highest were identified. Discordance between knowledge and performance on certain skills was identified (e.g., C-spine control - 93% correct on exam; 10% correct performance in lab). Implications: This study was the first systematic evaluation of the readiness of Air Force nurses. The injury patterns evaluated match current real-world requirements. The results demonstrate the limitations of self-assessment as an indicator of actual performance. The training scenarios/evaluation tool and the cognitive exam booklet (test, answers, rationale and references) were distributed to all Air Force facilities and made available throughout the DoD on a training website. The results have informed current AF readiness training. <br/>Funding Support: TriService Nursing Research Program.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:25:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:25:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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