2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158017
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical Readiness to Deploy
Abstract:
Clinical Readiness to Deploy
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Bridges, Elizabeth, PhD, RN, CCNS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Contact Telephone:206-543-6250
Purpose/Aims: To describe Air Force nurses' clinical readiness to deploy or respond to a contingency operation. Clinical readiness is the ability, under operational conditions, to provide nursing care for patients with trauma, disease or non-battle injuries, and to triage and regulate casualties for staging and land and air evacuation. Rationale/Background: The first step in the evaluation of clinical readiness is to determine what readiness preparation is required. Readiness preparation should focus on care for the most likely battle (e.g., bomb blast) and disease/non-battle injuries within the environmental context of deployment. No previous research had been conducted on the clinical readiness preparation of AF nurses.
Methods: A descriptive survey design was performed using a validated instrument. Subjects were identified from seven USAF military medical treatment facilities that deployed nurses in support of OPERATION Enduring Freedom/Iraqi Freedom. All nurses who deployed and were currently assigned to one of these facilities were invited to participate. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were used to analyze the responses.
Results: 139/223 eligible participants completed the survey (62% response rate). Respondent distribution was representative of the percentages contributed by each facility to deployment. Seventy percent of deployments were to the theater of operations (e.g., Iraq/Afghanistan); 30% to Europe. The largest groups were critical care and clinical nurses. Fifty-five percent indicated their wartime job was directly related to their peacetime job; 28% somewhat related and 17% not related. The latter group were pediatric, mental health and administrative nurses who served as clinical nurses. Sixty percent of the casualties were battle injuries and 40% disease/non-battle injuries. The nurses were queried on the utility of pre-deployment education and training specific to clinical readiness. Most useful were focused clinical courses (e.g., TNCC and ACLS) and military medical readiness training (EMEDs) specific to the operational environment of care. Least useful were general military readiness courses and general skills courses. The nurses were queried about the similarities and differences in the care provided between peacetime and wartime. Three main themes emerged: different types of patients, different types of skills, and different type of environment. The final open-ended question was: What three things would you teach every nurse before they deploy? Two themes emerged: clinical experience and personal preparation. Exemplars for clinical experience were specific to the increased incidence and severity of trauma that most nurses do not see on a day-to-day basis and personal preparation exemplars reflected the importance of critical thinking skills (e.g., flexibility, autonomy, independent thinking).
Implications: This study represents the first systematic analysis of the clinical readiness of USAF clinical nurses to deploy. A review of courses that were rated very useful by a majority of the participants provides insight into readiness preparation. Although there were relatively few cardiac arrests reported, ACLS was rated as very useful. It may be that the utility of ACLS is not solely in the content, but rather in the systematic process taught to respond to an emergency situation. The importance of both content and process is exemplified by the high utility rating from the Trauma Nurse Core Course. The day to day development of critical thinking skills also translates into increased clinical readiness. These results may be generalizable to civilian disaster response preparation. Funding Support: TriService Nursing Research Program.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClinical Readiness to Deployen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158017-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Clinical Readiness to Deploy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bridges, Elizabeth, PhD, RN, CCNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-543-6250</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ebridges@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: To describe Air Force nurses' clinical readiness to deploy or respond to a contingency operation. Clinical readiness is the ability, under operational conditions, to provide nursing care for patients with trauma, disease or non-battle injuries, and to triage and regulate casualties for staging and land and air evacuation. Rationale/Background: The first step in the evaluation of clinical readiness is to determine what readiness preparation is required. Readiness preparation should focus on care for the most likely battle (e.g., bomb blast) and disease/non-battle injuries within the environmental context of deployment. No previous research had been conducted on the clinical readiness preparation of AF nurses.<br/>Methods: A descriptive survey design was performed using a validated instrument. Subjects were identified from seven USAF military medical treatment facilities that deployed nurses in support of OPERATION Enduring Freedom/Iraqi Freedom. All nurses who deployed and were currently assigned to one of these facilities were invited to participate. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were used to analyze the responses.<br/>Results: 139/223 eligible participants completed the survey (62% response rate). Respondent distribution was representative of the percentages contributed by each facility to deployment. Seventy percent of deployments were to the theater of operations (e.g., Iraq/Afghanistan); 30% to Europe. The largest groups were critical care and clinical nurses. Fifty-five percent indicated their wartime job was directly related to their peacetime job; 28% somewhat related and 17% not related. The latter group were pediatric, mental health and administrative nurses who served as clinical nurses. Sixty percent of the casualties were battle injuries and 40% disease/non-battle injuries. The nurses were queried on the utility of pre-deployment education and training specific to clinical readiness. Most useful were focused clinical courses (e.g., TNCC and ACLS) and military medical readiness training (EMEDs) specific to the operational environment of care. Least useful were general military readiness courses and general skills courses. The nurses were queried about the similarities and differences in the care provided between peacetime and wartime. Three main themes emerged: different types of patients, different types of skills, and different type of environment. The final open-ended question was: What three things would you teach every nurse before they deploy? Two themes emerged: clinical experience and personal preparation. Exemplars for clinical experience were specific to the increased incidence and severity of trauma that most nurses do not see on a day-to-day basis and personal preparation exemplars reflected the importance of critical thinking skills (e.g., flexibility, autonomy, independent thinking).<br/>Implications: This study represents the first systematic analysis of the clinical readiness of USAF clinical nurses to deploy. A review of courses that were rated very useful by a majority of the participants provides insight into readiness preparation. Although there were relatively few cardiac arrests reported, ACLS was rated as very useful. It may be that the utility of ACLS is not solely in the content, but rather in the systematic process taught to respond to an emergency situation. The importance of both content and process is exemplified by the high utility rating from the Trauma Nurse Core Course. The day to day development of critical thinking skills also translates into increased clinical readiness. These results may be generalizable to civilian disaster response preparation. Funding Support: TriService Nursing Research Program.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:25:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:25:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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