2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158019
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Survey of Recent RN Graduates Perceptions of Educational Preparation
Abstract:
A Survey of Recent RN Graduates Perceptions of Educational Preparation
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Candela, Lori, EdD, CNE, APN, BC, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada-Las Vegas
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Box 453018, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA
Contact Telephone:702-895-2443
Co-Authors:Cheryl Bowles, EdD, RN
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine recent RN graduates perceptions of how well their educational program prepared them for practice in their first job as an RN. Background: Nursing programs often survey new graduates regarding perceptions of the quality of their educational preparation. Most often, this data is only used internally for program improvement. There are a limited number of published studies regarding nursing perceptions of educational programs. Additionally, there is a wealth of literature describing the need for curricula that prepares graduates for work in dynamic health care environments. Methods: A descriptive survey design was chosen for this study using a questionnaire developed by the researchers to examine perceptions of recent graduate nurses registered in the state of Nevada regarding their educational preparation. The Survey of Nurses' Perceptions of Educational Preparation was mailed to 3077 RN's licensed in Nevada who graduated from their basic nursing program within the last 5 years. Completed surveys were received from 352 respondents. Results: The average respondent was female and less than age 35. Fifty three percent were baccalaureate (BSN) graduates, 44% were associate degree (ADN) graduates and 3% were diploma graduates. No significant differences were noted between ADN and BSN graduates in their perceptions of educational preparation. Nurses who took first jobs in team versus primary care settings were more satisfied with their educational preparation. Factor analysis of the survey tool identified three dominant factors: skills for practice, professional development, and clinical performance. Overall, respondents were satisfied with their preparation regarding skills for practice. However, they felt least prepared in the areas of management, leadership, and organizational skills. Respondents also felt prepared with regard to professional development except in the area of accessing and managing electronic patient data systems. In the clinical practice area, 51% of respondents felt that their education better prepared them for boards versus practice. The majority (67%) believed that they did not have enough clinical hours in their program. Fifty-one percent indicated that they did not receive enough pharmacology preparation. Chronbach's alpha reliability assessment of the survey tool was .87 for this sample. Implications: Results suggest important considerations for nurse educators. Recent nurse graduates perceived that their education programs lacked sufficient pharmacology content and preparation for leadership/management roles. It is recommended that nursing programs better integrate these essential concepts throughout the curriculum via various active methods, such as case study and group management exercises. Respondents also indicated a lack of skill with regard to electronic patient data systems. This has become an increasingly important workforce skill. Nursing programs can enhance this skill by selecting clinical sites that feature electronic data systems and utilizing simulation scenarios in skills lab settings. The call for more clinical hours is common among nursing students. For many nursing programs this is not practical or reasonable. However, clinical practice time can be augmented with realistic clinical simulation learning experiences. It is also recommended that the study be repeated with a larger sample from other geographic locations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Survey of Recent RN Graduates Perceptions of Educational Preparationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158019-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Survey of Recent RN Graduates Perceptions of Educational Preparation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Candela, Lori, EdD, CNE, APN, BC, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada-Las Vegas</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Box 453018, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">702-895-2443</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lori.candela@unlv.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cheryl Bowles, EdD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine recent RN graduates perceptions of how well their educational program prepared them for practice in their first job as an RN. Background: Nursing programs often survey new graduates regarding perceptions of the quality of their educational preparation. Most often, this data is only used internally for program improvement. There are a limited number of published studies regarding nursing perceptions of educational programs. Additionally, there is a wealth of literature describing the need for curricula that prepares graduates for work in dynamic health care environments. Methods: A descriptive survey design was chosen for this study using a questionnaire developed by the researchers to examine perceptions of recent graduate nurses registered in the state of Nevada regarding their educational preparation. The Survey of Nurses' Perceptions of Educational Preparation was mailed to 3077 RN's licensed in Nevada who graduated from their basic nursing program within the last 5 years. Completed surveys were received from 352 respondents. Results: The average respondent was female and less than age 35. Fifty three percent were baccalaureate (BSN) graduates, 44% were associate degree (ADN) graduates and 3% were diploma graduates. No significant differences were noted between ADN and BSN graduates in their perceptions of educational preparation. Nurses who took first jobs in team versus primary care settings were more satisfied with their educational preparation. Factor analysis of the survey tool identified three dominant factors: skills for practice, professional development, and clinical performance. Overall, respondents were satisfied with their preparation regarding skills for practice. However, they felt least prepared in the areas of management, leadership, and organizational skills. Respondents also felt prepared with regard to professional development except in the area of accessing and managing electronic patient data systems. In the clinical practice area, 51% of respondents felt that their education better prepared them for boards versus practice. The majority (67%) believed that they did not have enough clinical hours in their program. Fifty-one percent indicated that they did not receive enough pharmacology preparation. Chronbach's alpha reliability assessment of the survey tool was .87 for this sample. Implications: Results suggest important considerations for nurse educators. Recent nurse graduates perceived that their education programs lacked sufficient pharmacology content and preparation for leadership/management roles. It is recommended that nursing programs better integrate these essential concepts throughout the curriculum via various active methods, such as case study and group management exercises. Respondents also indicated a lack of skill with regard to electronic patient data systems. This has become an increasingly important workforce skill. Nursing programs can enhance this skill by selecting clinical sites that feature electronic data systems and utilizing simulation scenarios in skills lab settings. The call for more clinical hours is common among nursing students. For many nursing programs this is not practical or reasonable. However, clinical practice time can be augmented with realistic clinical simulation learning experiences. It is also recommended that the study be repeated with a larger sample from other geographic locations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:25:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:25:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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