Gender Differences in Cardiovascular Reactivity and Depressive Symptoms in Couples

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158021
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gender Differences in Cardiovascular Reactivity and Depressive Symptoms in Couples
Abstract:
Gender Differences in Cardiovascular Reactivity and Depressive Symptoms in Couples
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Carrere, Sybil, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Research Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Dept of Family & Child Nursing, Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Contact Telephone:206-685-9120
Co-Authors:Eve-Anne M. Doohan, PhD
Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess gender differences in the relationship between marital satisfaction, depressive symptoms, and cardiovascular reactivity during marital conflict interaction. Rationale: Previous findings from our laboratory suggest that stress due to marital relationships may be greater for women than for men due to gender differences in the salience of close relationships. We tested this hypothesis in the context of structured laboratory marital conflict interaction sessions. Method: Both spouses from 121 couples completed questionnaire reports of marital satisfaction (Marital Adjustment Test, Locke & Wallace, 1959) and depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory, Beck, 1978). Electrocardiogram and impedance cardiography measures were obtained using BIOPAC instrumentation during a 10-minute baseline and a 10-minute marital problem-solving interaction in a laboratory setting. Cardiovascular measures of general autonomic arousal (interbeat interval, IBI), parasympathetic influence (high frequency heart rate variability, HF-HRV), and sympathetic influence (pre-ejection period, PEP) on the heart were used to measure cardiovascular reactivity. Results: Wives, but not husbands, who were unhappy in their marriages had significantly lower levels of parasympathetic cardiac arousal during both the baseline (.25, p< .01) and the discussion (.18, p<.05). Only the wives exhibited a significant correlation between greater marital satisfaction and longer cardiac interbeat intervals during the baseline (.18, p<.05) and conflict discussion (.19, p< ,05). A longer cardiac interbeat interval indicates lower autonomic arousal. Neither the wives nor the husbands marital quality were associated with cardiovascular sympathetic measures of arousal during the baseline and conflict discussion periods. Higher levels of depressive symptoms among the wives, but not husbands, were correlated with baseline measures of HF-HRV (-.23, p<.05) and IBI (-.26, p<.01), and discussion levels of IBI (-.28, p< .01) indicating lower parasympathetic and higher general autonomic arousal for the women with greater depressive symptoms. In contrast, for husbands, but not wives, depressive symptoms were associated with higher sympathetic cardiovascular arousal (shorter pre-ejection periods) for both the baseline (-.19, p< .05) and conflict discussion (-.28, p< .01). Implications: Women in distressed marriages and who are depressed exhibit greater autonomic cardiovascular arousal that is associated with lower parasympathetic influence on the heart. Depressed, but not martially distressed husbands, exhibit elevated sympathetic cardiovascular arousal during baseline and marital conflict interactions. These results suggest gender differences in cardiovascular mechanism of stress and health. Funding: National Institute of Mental Health (MH42484), National Institute for Nursing Research (# 2 P30 NR04001), and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (P30 HD02274).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGender Differences in Cardiovascular Reactivity and Depressive Symptoms in Couplesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158021-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gender Differences in Cardiovascular Reactivity and Depressive Symptoms in Couples</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Carrere, Sybil, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Dept of Family &amp; Child Nursing, Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-685-9120</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carrere@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Eve-Anne M. Doohan, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess gender differences in the relationship between marital satisfaction, depressive symptoms, and cardiovascular reactivity during marital conflict interaction. Rationale: Previous findings from our laboratory suggest that stress due to marital relationships may be greater for women than for men due to gender differences in the salience of close relationships. We tested this hypothesis in the context of structured laboratory marital conflict interaction sessions. Method: Both spouses from 121 couples completed questionnaire reports of marital satisfaction (Marital Adjustment Test, Locke &amp; Wallace, 1959) and depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory, Beck, 1978). Electrocardiogram and impedance cardiography measures were obtained using BIOPAC instrumentation during a 10-minute baseline and a 10-minute marital problem-solving interaction in a laboratory setting. Cardiovascular measures of general autonomic arousal (interbeat interval, IBI), parasympathetic influence (high frequency heart rate variability, HF-HRV), and sympathetic influence (pre-ejection period, PEP) on the heart were used to measure cardiovascular reactivity. Results: Wives, but not husbands, who were unhappy in their marriages had significantly lower levels of parasympathetic cardiac arousal during both the baseline (.25, p&lt; .01) and the discussion (.18, p&lt;.05). Only the wives exhibited a significant correlation between greater marital satisfaction and longer cardiac interbeat intervals during the baseline (.18, p&lt;.05) and conflict discussion (.19, p&lt; ,05). A longer cardiac interbeat interval indicates lower autonomic arousal. Neither the wives nor the husbands marital quality were associated with cardiovascular sympathetic measures of arousal during the baseline and conflict discussion periods. Higher levels of depressive symptoms among the wives, but not husbands, were correlated with baseline measures of HF-HRV (-.23, p&lt;.05) and IBI (-.26, p&lt;.01), and discussion levels of IBI (-.28, p&lt; .01) indicating lower parasympathetic and higher general autonomic arousal for the women with greater depressive symptoms. In contrast, for husbands, but not wives, depressive symptoms were associated with higher sympathetic cardiovascular arousal (shorter pre-ejection periods) for both the baseline (-.19, p&lt; .05) and conflict discussion (-.28, p&lt; .01). Implications: Women in distressed marriages and who are depressed exhibit greater autonomic cardiovascular arousal that is associated with lower parasympathetic influence on the heart. Depressed, but not martially distressed husbands, exhibit elevated sympathetic cardiovascular arousal during baseline and marital conflict interactions. These results suggest gender differences in cardiovascular mechanism of stress and health. Funding: National Institute of Mental Health (MH42484), National Institute for Nursing Research (# 2 P30 NR04001), and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (P30 HD02274).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:25:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:25:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.