2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158022
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Characteristics of Older Adults Admitted to the ICU
Abstract:
Characteristics of Older Adults Admitted to the ICU
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Casey, Colleen, RN, BS, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Science University
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:4921 NE 30th Avenue, Portland, OR, 97211, USA
Contact Telephone:503-494-0813
Co-Authors:Deborah Eldredge, PhD, RN; Cynthia Perez, BS, RN; and Jill A. Bennett, PhD, RN
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of older patients admitted to three different ICUs (neurological/trauma, cardiac/surgical, and medical) at an academic medical center in the Pacific Northwest. Background: The aging of America is changing the profile of health care. In comparison to the overall population, older persons are hospitalized more frequently and have longer lengths of stay than any other age group. Based on these trends, increasing numbers of older adults are cared for in intensive care units (ICU). The older ICU patient is physiologically, psychologically, and socially different from a younger patient, making ICU nursing and medical care complex for these patients. It is known that age, physical function, and medical factors can affect the course of illness of older adults. However, other characteristics of older adults that may also influence their treatment and course of hospitalization need to be identified. Methods: The sample included all patients 75 years of age and older admitted to three ICUs over a three-month period from September 1, 2005, to December 1, 2005. Data were from a retrospective chart review of the nursing admission database and physician history and physical data, all completed during the first 24 hours after admission. Baseline body mass index, living situation prior to ICU admission or hospitalization, functional status, use of any functional aids, relationship and proximity of contact person, admission diagnoses, and habits (alcohol and tobacco) were measured. Results: Data will be analyzed using SPSS software and preliminary results presented that describe the characteristics of the sample. Implications: The findings from this study will help clinicians and researchers better understand the pre-admission characteristics of older adults admitted to an ICU setting. Our data will provide important information about these characteristics. By actively incorporating our knowledge of these characteristics into the plan of care of older ICU patients, we can most effectively treat and care for this population. Acknowledgments: First author acknowledges funding from the John A. Hartford Foundation Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Program.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCharacteristics of Older Adults Admitted to the ICUen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158022-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Characteristics of Older Adults Admitted to the ICU</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Casey, Colleen, RN, BS, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Science University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4921 NE 30th Avenue, Portland, OR, 97211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">503-494-0813</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">caseyc@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Deborah Eldredge, PhD, RN; Cynthia Perez, BS, RN; and Jill A. Bennett, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of older patients admitted to three different ICUs (neurological/trauma, cardiac/surgical, and medical) at an academic medical center in the Pacific Northwest. Background: The aging of America is changing the profile of health care. In comparison to the overall population, older persons are hospitalized more frequently and have longer lengths of stay than any other age group. Based on these trends, increasing numbers of older adults are cared for in intensive care units (ICU). The older ICU patient is physiologically, psychologically, and socially different from a younger patient, making ICU nursing and medical care complex for these patients. It is known that age, physical function, and medical factors can affect the course of illness of older adults. However, other characteristics of older adults that may also influence their treatment and course of hospitalization need to be identified. Methods: The sample included all patients 75 years of age and older admitted to three ICUs over a three-month period from September 1, 2005, to December 1, 2005. Data were from a retrospective chart review of the nursing admission database and physician history and physical data, all completed during the first 24 hours after admission. Baseline body mass index, living situation prior to ICU admission or hospitalization, functional status, use of any functional aids, relationship and proximity of contact person, admission diagnoses, and habits (alcohol and tobacco) were measured. Results: Data will be analyzed using SPSS software and preliminary results presented that describe the characteristics of the sample. Implications: The findings from this study will help clinicians and researchers better understand the pre-admission characteristics of older adults admitted to an ICU setting. Our data will provide important information about these characteristics. By actively incorporating our knowledge of these characteristics into the plan of care of older ICU patients, we can most effectively treat and care for this population. Acknowledgments: First author acknowledges funding from the John A. Hartford Foundation Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Program.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:25:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:25:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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