2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158023
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Abuse and STI: Reinfection Results of a Controlled-Randomized Trial
Abstract:
Abuse and STI: Reinfection Results of a Controlled-Randomized Trial
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Champion, Jane, PhD, FNP, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas HSC at San Antonio
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:525 N. Getty Street, Uvalde, TX, 78801, USA
Contact Telephone:210-227-7233
Co-Authors:Jeanna M. Piper, MD; Rochelle N. Shain, PhD; Jeff E. Korte, PhD; and Alan E .C. Holden, PhD
Purpose: There is a need for community-based, culturally sensitive, cognitive-behavioral interventions to reduce sexual risk behavior among minority women and adolescents for prevention of STI/HIV and abuse. This study was part of a controlled randomized trial of the effects of a sex- and culture-specific behavioral intervention on STI recurrence. The principal outcome variable was subsequent chlamydial or gonorrheal infection, evaluated on an intention-to-treat basis by logistic-regression. Results of the first and second trial demonstrated participants receiving intervention were significantly less likely to be re-infected with STI. Although the intervention was successful with the sample as a whole, physically and sexually abused women were not helped. These findings have relevance to clinicians who work with abused women. Rationale/Conceptual Framework: Our behavioral interventions developed in the studies, "Modifying STI Risk Behavior among Minority Women." (Study 1:1991-1995; Study 2:1995-2004) are unique in that they were designed and evaluated as culturally relevant, minority-women-specific interventions based upon the AIDS Risk Reduction Model. These interventions are grounded in knowledge of the target populations' behavior and culture, and were shown to be effective through these controlled randomized trials. Methods: Mexican- and African-American women (aged 15-45 years) with a current non-viral STI were recruited from public-health clinics. Following enrollment, participants received a targeted physical exam and interview including assessments for sexual, physical or psychological abuse, sexual risk behavior and STI. Self-report data assessing risk for PID included age of first coitus, numbers of sex partners, recurrence of STI, and health seeking behaviors. Participant follow-ups were conducted at 6, 12 and 24-month intervals. Results: 862 Mexican- and African-American women were enrolled. Sixty-two percent reported sexual or physical abuse; 74% reported psychological abuse. Abused women reported earlier first coitus, more partners per year sexual activity, more concurrent relationships and significantly higher STI re-infection rates than non-abused at 6, 12, and 24-month intervals. Abused women waited longer to seek medical care, experienced more barriers to health care and more pathological genitourinary symptomatology and abnormal physical exams than nonabused. Abused adolescents reported the highest STI re-infection rates at these intervals. Implications: Findings differentiate abused women particularly adolescents at high risk for STI re-infection and PID. Due to its considerable impact on STI and PID risk, abuse assessment is essential in clinical management of minority women and adolescents with STI and diagnosis of PID. Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAbuse and STI: Reinfection Results of a Controlled-Randomized Trialen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158023-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Abuse and STI: Reinfection Results of a Controlled-Randomized Trial</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Champion, Jane, PhD, FNP, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas HSC at San Antonio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">525 N. Getty Street, Uvalde, TX, 78801, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">210-227-7233</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dimmitt@uthscsa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jeanna M. Piper, MD; Rochelle N. Shain, PhD; Jeff E. Korte, PhD; and Alan E .C. Holden, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: There is a need for community-based, culturally sensitive, cognitive-behavioral interventions to reduce sexual risk behavior among minority women and adolescents for prevention of STI/HIV and abuse. This study was part of a controlled randomized trial of the effects of a sex- and culture-specific behavioral intervention on STI recurrence. The principal outcome variable was subsequent chlamydial or gonorrheal infection, evaluated on an intention-to-treat basis by logistic-regression. Results of the first and second trial demonstrated participants receiving intervention were significantly less likely to be re-infected with STI. Although the intervention was successful with the sample as a whole, physically and sexually abused women were not helped. These findings have relevance to clinicians who work with abused women. Rationale/Conceptual Framework: Our behavioral interventions developed in the studies, &quot;Modifying STI Risk Behavior among Minority Women.&quot; (Study 1:1991-1995; Study 2:1995-2004) are unique in that they were designed and evaluated as culturally relevant, minority-women-specific interventions based upon the AIDS Risk Reduction Model. These interventions are grounded in knowledge of the target populations' behavior and culture, and were shown to be effective through these controlled randomized trials. Methods: Mexican- and African-American women (aged 15-45 years) with a current non-viral STI were recruited from public-health clinics. Following enrollment, participants received a targeted physical exam and interview including assessments for sexual, physical or psychological abuse, sexual risk behavior and STI. Self-report data assessing risk for PID included age of first coitus, numbers of sex partners, recurrence of STI, and health seeking behaviors. Participant follow-ups were conducted at 6, 12 and 24-month intervals. Results: 862 Mexican- and African-American women were enrolled. Sixty-two percent reported sexual or physical abuse; 74% reported psychological abuse. Abused women reported earlier first coitus, more partners per year sexual activity, more concurrent relationships and significantly higher STI re-infection rates than non-abused at 6, 12, and 24-month intervals. Abused women waited longer to seek medical care, experienced more barriers to health care and more pathological genitourinary symptomatology and abnormal physical exams than nonabused. Abused adolescents reported the highest STI re-infection rates at these intervals. Implications: Findings differentiate abused women particularly adolescents at high risk for STI re-infection and PID. Due to its considerable impact on STI and PID risk, abuse assessment is essential in clinical management of minority women and adolescents with STI and diagnosis of PID. Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:25:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:25:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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