2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158024
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Feasibility of Methods for Evaluating Naps for Nurses Working Night Shift
Abstract:
Feasibility of Methods for Evaluating Naps for Nurses Working Night Shift
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Cheek, Rita, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University-Bozeman
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, MB 2961, Missoula Campus, 32 Campus Drive 7416, Missoula, MT, 59812-7416, USA
Contact Telephone:406-243-2610
Introduction: Night shift workers have an increased risk for chronic, partial sleep deprivation that may compromise their health and work performance. Providing nurses with a nap during night shift could improve their work performance in the latter part of the shift. This descriptive pilot study assessed the feasibility of proposed methods for evaluating the effects of a 30 minute nap during the night on sleepiness, fatigue, and cognitive function for nurses working 12 hour night shifts in a 190 bed hospital. Methods: Seven registered nurses, ages 27 - 58 years, participated in 1 night of data collection with a 30 min. nap between 1:00 and 3:00 am. Participants self-assessed their sleepiness and fatigue approximately every 2 hours during the night. Sleepiness, fatigue, and cognitive function (Digit-Span Test, Stroop Task, and Long Term Memory Test) were assessed immediately before and 15 - 20 minutes after the nap. Results: The study protocol was implemented without difficulty. Sleepiness and fatigue increased before the nap with a transient decrease following the nap, but the change was not significant. The Digit-span, Color Naming, and Long-term Memory tests were no different pre- and post-nap. Word naming was slower post-nap than pre-nap (p = .007). Stroop naming was significantly faster post-nap than pre-nap (p = .04). Conclusion: The protocol is reasonable to implement for nurses working in an acute care hospital. This data supports further study using an experimental design to evaluate the effects of napping on cognitive function for nurses working night shift. Funded by 2003 ANF Research Grant ID # 2003091 - Julia Hardy, RN Scholar with contributions by St. Patrick Hospital & Health Sciences Center, Missoula, MT.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFeasibility of Methods for Evaluating Naps for Nurses Working Night Shiften_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158024-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Feasibility of Methods for Evaluating Naps for Nurses Working Night Shift</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cheek, Rita, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University-Bozeman</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, MB 2961, Missoula Campus, 32 Campus Drive 7416, Missoula, MT, 59812-7416, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406-243-2610</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rcheek@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: Night shift workers have an increased risk for chronic, partial sleep deprivation that may compromise their health and work performance. Providing nurses with a nap during night shift could improve their work performance in the latter part of the shift. This descriptive pilot study assessed the feasibility of proposed methods for evaluating the effects of a 30 minute nap during the night on sleepiness, fatigue, and cognitive function for nurses working 12 hour night shifts in a 190 bed hospital. Methods: Seven registered nurses, ages 27 - 58 years, participated in 1 night of data collection with a 30 min. nap between 1:00 and 3:00 am. Participants self-assessed their sleepiness and fatigue approximately every 2 hours during the night. Sleepiness, fatigue, and cognitive function (Digit-Span Test, Stroop Task, and Long Term Memory Test) were assessed immediately before and 15 - 20 minutes after the nap. Results: The study protocol was implemented without difficulty. Sleepiness and fatigue increased before the nap with a transient decrease following the nap, but the change was not significant. The Digit-span, Color Naming, and Long-term Memory tests were no different pre- and post-nap. Word naming was slower post-nap than pre-nap (p = .007). Stroop naming was significantly faster post-nap than pre-nap (p = .04). Conclusion: The protocol is reasonable to implement for nurses working in an acute care hospital. This data supports further study using an experimental design to evaluate the effects of napping on cognitive function for nurses working night shift. Funded by 2003 ANF Research Grant ID # 2003091 - Julia Hardy, RN Scholar with contributions by St. Patrick Hospital &amp; Health Sciences Center, Missoula, MT.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:26:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:26:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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