2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158026
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reducing Health Disparities: Recruitment of Sensitive and Diverse Providers
Abstract:
Reducing Health Disparities: Recruitment of Sensitive and Diverse Providers
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Choppala, Sheela, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Intercollegiate College of Nursing, 14204 NE Salmon Creek Avenue, Vancouver, WA, 98686, USA
Contact Telephone:360-546-9622
Aims: The specific aims of this qualitative study are: (1) Develop a theory regarding the process of engagement of physicians and nurses working with vulnerable and underserved populations and develop of a model of provider engagement, (2) Identify characteristics of the providers that make them likely to be providers sensitive to the needs of minority and marginalized populations, and (3) Identify themes/processes unique to subgroups of participants such as nurse practitioners, doctors and minority providers. Background: While the causes of health disparity are many, the 2003 Institute of Medicine Report entitled, "Unequal Treatment: Confronting racial and ethnic disparities in healthcare," brought the issue of unconscious bias of providers to prominent awareness. Concurrent to that report, we were also finding that community health centers (CHCs) were agencies in which care was perceived by clients to be fair and equitable and health disparities were remarkably low. This study attempts to uncover some reasons for the success of the providers in CHCs and determine how best to recruit sensitive providers to work with vulnerable populations in order to expand the reach of CHCs. An emphasis will be placed on uncovering issues related to the lack of minority providers within the workforce. Methods: The sample being recruited includes providers at CHCs and free clinics in the Vancouver area. An attempt is being made to ensure representation of nurse practitioners, physicians, and ethnic minority groups. Qualitative interviews focus on obtaining information related to the participant's personal background, values guiding the choice to serve in a CHC, and educational preparation/exposure to work with vulnerable populations. Data collected also include information about incentives as well as challenges to the work. Grounded theory is being used to analyze the data and develop a model for understanding providers and their engagement processes. Results: Preliminary results suggest emergence of dominant themes indicating that CHC/free clinic providers are individuals with a keen sense of social justice and fairness. They are driven to engage in this work by a value system developed in childhood. They are also individuals who have close family relationships and were raised in a religious household. Information thus far also reveals that visa procurement and the loan repayment program possibly add to the personal incentive of "feeling good about doing the right thing". Lack of resources, feeling powerless to help with appropriate services, and psychosocial issues are among the problems that make continued work in CHCs challenging. Implications: Funding has been obtained to transform these qualitative results into a survey that will be disseminated to providers throughout Washington State. The resulting data will inform nursing and medical educators of best practices regarding integration of social justice and vulnerable population care within curricula. Best practices will increase the likelihood of sensitive providers choosing this practice venue. Findings also contribute to policy-makers' awareness of incentives to bring providers into the CHC workforce which has been federally mandated to expand. Funding: Carl Hansen Funds, WSU.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReducing Health Disparities: Recruitment of Sensitive and Diverse Providersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158026-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Reducing Health Disparities: Recruitment of Sensitive and Diverse Providers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Choppala, Sheela, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Intercollegiate College of Nursing, 14204 NE Salmon Creek Avenue, Vancouver, WA, 98686, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">360-546-9622</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">choppala@vancouver.wsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aims: The specific aims of this qualitative study are: (1) Develop a theory regarding the process of engagement of physicians and nurses working with vulnerable and underserved populations and develop of a model of provider engagement, (2) Identify characteristics of the providers that make them likely to be providers sensitive to the needs of minority and marginalized populations, and (3) Identify themes/processes unique to subgroups of participants such as nurse practitioners, doctors and minority providers. Background: While the causes of health disparity are many, the 2003 Institute of Medicine Report entitled, &quot;Unequal Treatment: Confronting racial and ethnic disparities in healthcare,&quot; brought the issue of unconscious bias of providers to prominent awareness. Concurrent to that report, we were also finding that community health centers (CHCs) were agencies in which care was perceived by clients to be fair and equitable and health disparities were remarkably low. This study attempts to uncover some reasons for the success of the providers in CHCs and determine how best to recruit sensitive providers to work with vulnerable populations in order to expand the reach of CHCs. An emphasis will be placed on uncovering issues related to the lack of minority providers within the workforce. Methods: The sample being recruited includes providers at CHCs and free clinics in the Vancouver area. An attempt is being made to ensure representation of nurse practitioners, physicians, and ethnic minority groups. Qualitative interviews focus on obtaining information related to the participant's personal background, values guiding the choice to serve in a CHC, and educational preparation/exposure to work with vulnerable populations. Data collected also include information about incentives as well as challenges to the work. Grounded theory is being used to analyze the data and develop a model for understanding providers and their engagement processes. Results: Preliminary results suggest emergence of dominant themes indicating that CHC/free clinic providers are individuals with a keen sense of social justice and fairness. They are driven to engage in this work by a value system developed in childhood. They are also individuals who have close family relationships and were raised in a religious household. Information thus far also reveals that visa procurement and the loan repayment program possibly add to the personal incentive of &quot;feeling good about doing the right thing&quot;. Lack of resources, feeling powerless to help with appropriate services, and psychosocial issues are among the problems that make continued work in CHCs challenging. Implications: Funding has been obtained to transform these qualitative results into a survey that will be disseminated to providers throughout Washington State. The resulting data will inform nursing and medical educators of best practices regarding integration of social justice and vulnerable population care within curricula. Best practices will increase the likelihood of sensitive providers choosing this practice venue. Findings also contribute to policy-makers' awareness of incentives to bring providers into the CHC workforce which has been federally mandated to expand. Funding: Carl Hansen Funds, WSU.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:26:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:26:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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