2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158027
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Physiologic Health in Children with Cystic Fibrosis
Abstract:
Improving Physiologic Health in Children with Cystic Fibrosis
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Christian, Becky, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Utah
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:3348 Splendor Circle, Salt Lake City, UT, 84124, USA
Contact Telephone:801-581-6708
Purpose/Aims: This report focuses on the effectiveness of an intervention to improve physiologic health status in children (8-12 years) with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) over time, while the purpose of the larger study was to test the effectiveness of an intervention to teach children to manage the physiologic, functional, and psychosocial impact of CF. Background: Technological improvements have led to dramatic increases in survival rates for children with CF over the past 40 years with a median survival age over 32 years. Children with CF typically exhibit compromised pulmonary and nutritional status resulting in poor growth. Pulmonary function has been shown to have a direct association with survival of children with CF. Physical activity is related to improved pulmonary function and a reduction in disease progression. To date, few intervention studies have been conducted with children with CF, and longitudinal studies are rare. Moreover, few studies have examined interrelationships among physical activity, nutritional status, pulmonary function, and psychosocial development in children with CF. Improved prognosis and survival of children with CF have created the need to develop new health promotion and maintenance strategies to teach children to manage long-term consequences of chronic illness to delay disease progression with the transition to adulthood. Methods: A two-group experimental, repeated measures design compared 116 children with CF (59 boys; 57 girls) randomly assigned to community-based intervention and usual care groups followed at 3-, 6-, and 9-months post-intervention. We measured pulmonary function [FEV1 % (predicted)]; body mass index (BMI); perceived impact of illness experience; functional disability; loneliness; and self-competence. The problem-solving intervention was delivered using an individual tailored, home visit combined with a structured, small group session. Results: Children had mild CF severity [mean FEV1 % (predicted) = 84.31%], and were > 50th percentile for physical growth (mean BMI) for age and gender for both boys (16.82 + 2.39) and girls (16.21 + 1.68). Ninety-six percent of the children participated in moderate to vigorous (METS > 6.0) physical activities 4 to 7 times/week. Predominant physical activities included: bicycling, basketball, running, baseball, soccer, trampoline, and playing outside. Participation in moderate to vigorous physical activity was significantly associated with improved FEV1, athletic competence, decreased loneliness, peer rejection, enzyme use, and CPT. Greater BMI was significantly associated with increased FEV1% (predicted), increased loneliness, decreased social competence related to appearance, and greater impact of CF on physical appearance. Implications: Interventions focused on increasing physical activity and enhancing nutritional status and growth have promise for decreasing the physiologic effects and functional health problems for children with CF. These linkages between physiologic health, functional ability, and the psychosocial demands of chronic illness are important for teaching children to manage their CF and integrate their chronic illness into their everyday lives. With improved survival and increased lifespan, children with CF must learn to balance their physiologic and functional health demands with their psychosocial and developmental needs to improve their quality of life. Funding: National Institutes of Health, National Institute for Nursing Research (#R01 NR04576); and Center for Research on Chronic Illness, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, National Institutes of Health, National Institute for Nursing Research (#2P30 NR03962).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Physiologic Health in Children with Cystic Fibrosisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158027-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Improving Physiologic Health in Children with Cystic Fibrosis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Christian, Becky, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Utah</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3348 Splendor Circle, Salt Lake City, UT, 84124, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-581-6708</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">becky.christian@nurs.utah.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: This report focuses on the effectiveness of an intervention to improve physiologic health status in children (8-12 years) with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) over time, while the purpose of the larger study was to test the effectiveness of an intervention to teach children to manage the physiologic, functional, and psychosocial impact of CF. Background: Technological improvements have led to dramatic increases in survival rates for children with CF over the past 40 years with a median survival age over 32 years. Children with CF typically exhibit compromised pulmonary and nutritional status resulting in poor growth. Pulmonary function has been shown to have a direct association with survival of children with CF. Physical activity is related to improved pulmonary function and a reduction in disease progression. To date, few intervention studies have been conducted with children with CF, and longitudinal studies are rare. Moreover, few studies have examined interrelationships among physical activity, nutritional status, pulmonary function, and psychosocial development in children with CF. Improved prognosis and survival of children with CF have created the need to develop new health promotion and maintenance strategies to teach children to manage long-term consequences of chronic illness to delay disease progression with the transition to adulthood. Methods: A two-group experimental, repeated measures design compared 116 children with CF (59 boys; 57 girls) randomly assigned to community-based intervention and usual care groups followed at 3-, 6-, and 9-months post-intervention. We measured pulmonary function [FEV1 % (predicted)]; body mass index (BMI); perceived impact of illness experience; functional disability; loneliness; and self-competence. The problem-solving intervention was delivered using an individual tailored, home visit combined with a structured, small group session. Results: Children had mild CF severity [mean FEV1 % (predicted) = 84.31%], and were &gt; 50th percentile for physical growth (mean BMI) for age and gender for both boys (16.82 + 2.39) and girls (16.21 + 1.68). Ninety-six percent of the children participated in moderate to vigorous (METS &gt; 6.0) physical activities 4 to 7 times/week. Predominant physical activities included: bicycling, basketball, running, baseball, soccer, trampoline, and playing outside. Participation in moderate to vigorous physical activity was significantly associated with improved FEV1, athletic competence, decreased loneliness, peer rejection, enzyme use, and CPT. Greater BMI was significantly associated with increased FEV1% (predicted), increased loneliness, decreased social competence related to appearance, and greater impact of CF on physical appearance. Implications: Interventions focused on increasing physical activity and enhancing nutritional status and growth have promise for decreasing the physiologic effects and functional health problems for children with CF. These linkages between physiologic health, functional ability, and the psychosocial demands of chronic illness are important for teaching children to manage their CF and integrate their chronic illness into their everyday lives. With improved survival and increased lifespan, children with CF must learn to balance their physiologic and functional health demands with their psychosocial and developmental needs to improve their quality of life. Funding: National Institutes of Health, National Institute for Nursing Research (#R01 NR04576); and Center for Research on Chronic Illness, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, National Institutes of Health, National Institute for Nursing Research (#2P30 NR03962).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:26:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:26:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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