2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158030
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Training Nurses on Interventions to Change Behavior
Abstract:
Training Nurses on Interventions to Change Behavior
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Cook, Paul, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado at Denver and HSC
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 4200 E 9th Avenue, Box C288-4, Denver, CO, 80262, USA
Contact Telephone:303-315-0578
Co-Authors:Teresa J. Sakraida, DNSc, RN
Purposes/Aims: This study is an investigation of the experience of community-based registered nurses who are being trained to provide patient counseling based on psychological theories. Rationale/Background: Nurses are often called upon to counsel patients about changing their health behavior, and psychologically based interventions have been found more efficacious than education or other interventions in producing actual changes in patients' behavior. However, psychologically based interventions may be unfamiliar to health care professionals. This study's aims are (a) to investigate whether specific training methods are effective in increasing nurses' knowledge, skills, behavior, and outcomes in counseling patients about health behavior change, and (b) to investigate and document factors such as training, experience, or psychological characteristics that may influence the success or failure of this type of training activity. Methods: Study participants are experienced registered nurses who are being trained to provide a specific psychologically based patient counseling program, the ScriptAssist treatment adherence program (a product of Centene Corporation, St. Louis, MO). All nurses receiving training in this telehealth practice setting are eligible to participate. Prior to the training program, the participants will provide demographic information. The training outcomes will be evaluated using Kirkpatrick's typology of training outcomes (Bates, 2004): trainee satisfaction, trainee learning, trainee behavior, and eventual performance in the counseling role. Structured questionnaires and pre-post statistical tests will be use to assess training outcomes in each of the four categories. In addition, the study will gather qualitative data through free-response forms about trainees' experiences during training and any barriers to training success that may arise. Outcomes achieved/documented: This study is in progress. Preliminary descriptive and correlational analyses will be reported, including pre-post testing of improvements in trainees' knowledge and skills, and related data on trainee experiences and barriers to training. Implications and recommendations: The study results could suggest (a) more effective methods for training community-based nurses on psychological techniques, (b) curricular needs in nursing education, and (c) barriers that make it difficult to learn or apply effective psychological techniques to change patients' behavior. Reference: Bates, R. (2004). A critical analysis of evaluation practice: the Kirkpatrick model and the principle of beneficence. Evaluation and Program Planning, 27, 341-347.This study is funded through a contract with Centene Corporation, St. Louis MO.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTraining Nurses on Interventions to Change Behavioren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158030-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Training Nurses on Interventions to Change Behavior</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cook, Paul, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado at Denver and HSC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 4200 E 9th Avenue, Box C288-4, Denver, CO, 80262, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">303-315-0578</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">paul.cook@uchsc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Teresa J. Sakraida, DNSc, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: This study is an investigation of the experience of community-based registered nurses who are being trained to provide patient counseling based on psychological theories. Rationale/Background: Nurses are often called upon to counsel patients about changing their health behavior, and psychologically based interventions have been found more efficacious than education or other interventions in producing actual changes in patients' behavior. However, psychologically based interventions may be unfamiliar to health care professionals. This study's aims are (a) to investigate whether specific training methods are effective in increasing nurses' knowledge, skills, behavior, and outcomes in counseling patients about health behavior change, and (b) to investigate and document factors such as training, experience, or psychological characteristics that may influence the success or failure of this type of training activity. Methods: Study participants are experienced registered nurses who are being trained to provide a specific psychologically based patient counseling program, the ScriptAssist treatment adherence program (a product of Centene Corporation, St. Louis, MO). All nurses receiving training in this telehealth practice setting are eligible to participate. Prior to the training program, the participants will provide demographic information. The training outcomes will be evaluated using Kirkpatrick's typology of training outcomes (Bates, 2004): trainee satisfaction, trainee learning, trainee behavior, and eventual performance in the counseling role. Structured questionnaires and pre-post statistical tests will be use to assess training outcomes in each of the four categories. In addition, the study will gather qualitative data through free-response forms about trainees' experiences during training and any barriers to training success that may arise. Outcomes achieved/documented: This study is in progress. Preliminary descriptive and correlational analyses will be reported, including pre-post testing of improvements in trainees' knowledge and skills, and related data on trainee experiences and barriers to training. Implications and recommendations: The study results could suggest (a) more effective methods for training community-based nurses on psychological techniques, (b) curricular needs in nursing education, and (c) barriers that make it difficult to learn or apply effective psychological techniques to change patients' behavior. Reference: Bates, R. (2004). A critical analysis of evaluation practice: the Kirkpatrick model and the principle of beneficence. Evaluation and Program Planning, 27, 341-347.This study is funded through a contract with Centene Corporation, St. Louis MO.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:26:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:26:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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