2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158031
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Violence and Help Seeking Among Mothers of Mentally Ill Adult Children
Abstract:
Violence and Help Seeking Among Mothers of Mentally Ill Adult Children
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Copeland, Darcy, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of California-Los Angeles
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:4422 Via Marina, Apt 709, Marina del Rey, CA, 90292-6894, USA
Purposes/Aims: Because mothers are at particularly high risk to be victims of violence perpetrated by a mentally ill adult child and are frequently primary caretakers in families, the purpose of this study is to examine the experiences of mothers who are victims of violence perpetrated by a mentally ill child and their help-seeking behaviors in relation to these experiences. The questions guiding this research are: 1) What meaning do mothers attach to their experiences of violence perpetrated by an adult child who is mentally ill? 2) What is the decision-making process these women use to seek help? and 3) What is the meaning of helpful assistance for these women? The emphasis of this study will be to understand how the meanings of their experiences affect the processes mothers go through to help themselves and/or other family members when their mentally ill child becomes violent. Explication of the factors that influence these women's decision-making and their perceptions of what is indeed helpful will be useful in providing direction for screening protocols, family based intervention strategies, and in identifying ongoing research needs. Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: Although no more prone to violence than the general population, when mentally ill individuals do become violent, family members are the victims more than 50% of the time. The most common family member targeted is a parent, specifically a mother. Studies of hospitalized mentally ill individuals indicate that most patients who assaulted a family member planned to return home after discharge. Even with hospitalization available, the majority of families with a mentally ill individual delayed seeking professional help for more than 2 weeks after the onset of psychotic symptoms or more than 2 episodes of violent behavior. Differential treatment by healthcare professionals towards relatives of mentally ill individuals compared to families of physically ill individuals have also been described. Some parents are severely affected by having a mentally ill adult child and reported feeling as though their child's illness led to mental health problems of their own, that at times they believed their child would be better off dead, or that their burden was so heavy that they considered suicide. Methods: Grounded Theory methodology will be used to uncover the meanings that mothers who have been victims of violence by adult children with a mental illness attach to their experiences and the social and situational factors influencing their help-seeking behaviors. Semi-structured interviews eliciting information about the experiences and decision-making process of approximately 20 mothers who have experienced violence from a mentally ill adult child within the past year will be conducted. Implications: A great deal of research has been conducted emphasizing risk factors for violent behavior and victimization among mentally ill individuals and their families. How family members attempt to mitigate their risk and what they consider helpful amidst the social isolation and stigmatization they experience has not been addressed. Since mothers are most often the victims of violence committed by individuals with a major mental illness, mental health professionals need to understand their experiences, the timing and triggers for seeking treatment for themselves and their children, and from whom that help is sought in order to facilitate the recovery process for the entire family. Funding Support: This study is being made possible through National Institute of Nursing Research grant
5 T32 NR 07077, Vulnerable Populations/Health Disparities Research at UCLA School of Nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleViolence and Help Seeking Among Mothers of Mentally Ill Adult Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158031-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Violence and Help Seeking Among Mothers of Mentally Ill Adult Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Copeland, Darcy, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California-Los Angeles</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4422 Via Marina, Apt 709, Marina del Rey, CA, 90292-6894, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dcopelan@ucla.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: Because mothers are at particularly high risk to be victims of violence perpetrated by a mentally ill adult child and are frequently primary caretakers in families, the purpose of this study is to examine the experiences of mothers who are victims of violence perpetrated by a mentally ill child and their help-seeking behaviors in relation to these experiences. The questions guiding this research are: 1) What meaning do mothers attach to their experiences of violence perpetrated by an adult child who is mentally ill? 2) What is the decision-making process these women use to seek help? and 3) What is the meaning of helpful assistance for these women? The emphasis of this study will be to understand how the meanings of their experiences affect the processes mothers go through to help themselves and/or other family members when their mentally ill child becomes violent. Explication of the factors that influence these women's decision-making and their perceptions of what is indeed helpful will be useful in providing direction for screening protocols, family based intervention strategies, and in identifying ongoing research needs. Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: Although no more prone to violence than the general population, when mentally ill individuals do become violent, family members are the victims more than 50% of the time. The most common family member targeted is a parent, specifically a mother. Studies of hospitalized mentally ill individuals indicate that most patients who assaulted a family member planned to return home after discharge. Even with hospitalization available, the majority of families with a mentally ill individual delayed seeking professional help for more than 2 weeks after the onset of psychotic symptoms or more than 2 episodes of violent behavior. Differential treatment by healthcare professionals towards relatives of mentally ill individuals compared to families of physically ill individuals have also been described. Some parents are severely affected by having a mentally ill adult child and reported feeling as though their child's illness led to mental health problems of their own, that at times they believed their child would be better off dead, or that their burden was so heavy that they considered suicide. Methods: Grounded Theory methodology will be used to uncover the meanings that mothers who have been victims of violence by adult children with a mental illness attach to their experiences and the social and situational factors influencing their help-seeking behaviors. Semi-structured interviews eliciting information about the experiences and decision-making process of approximately 20 mothers who have experienced violence from a mentally ill adult child within the past year will be conducted. Implications: A great deal of research has been conducted emphasizing risk factors for violent behavior and victimization among mentally ill individuals and their families. How family members attempt to mitigate their risk and what they consider helpful amidst the social isolation and stigmatization they experience has not been addressed. Since mothers are most often the victims of violence committed by individuals with a major mental illness, mental health professionals need to understand their experiences, the timing and triggers for seeking treatment for themselves and their children, and from whom that help is sought in order to facilitate the recovery process for the entire family. Funding Support: This study is being made possible through National Institute of Nursing Research grant <br/>5 T32 NR 07077, Vulnerable Populations/Health Disparities Research at UCLA School of Nursing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:26:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:26:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.