2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158034
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nutrition Status of Hispanic Nursing Home Residents
Abstract:
Nutrition Status of Hispanic Nursing Home Residents
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Crogan, Neva, PhD, APRN, BC, FNGNA
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Arizona
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:7418 E. Riverbank Loop, Tucson, AZ, 85715, USA
Contact Telephone:520-626-3770
Co-Authors:Bronwynne C. Evans, PhD, RN, CNS
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a description of older Hispanic residents in nursing homes. This description was derived from the initial stages of an urgently needed investigation into the nutrition status of understudied Hispanic nursing home residents, to be used as a basis for generating future theory-driven interventions. Background: There are over 35 million Hispanics in the U.S. (12.5% of the population), a number that has grown almost 60% since 1990 (U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2000). The cohort over age 65 is expected to grow faster than any other racial or ethnic group (a 328% increase from 1999-2030), tripling in number to 13 million by 2050 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003; Angel & Hogan, 1994). By 2030, one-quarter of the U. S. Hispanic population will be 80 or over, when the risk of disability increases dramatically (Espino, Mouton, Del Aguila, Parker, Lewis & Miles, 2001). At least 4.5 million will require nursing home care because of disability due to dementia and chronic disease (Markides, Rudkin, Angel, & Espino, 1997). Ten percent of the 83,000 Arizona nursing home residents admitted from 1999-2001 were Hispanic (Arizona Department of Economic Society, 2004). Assuming the same number of beds and the same Hispanic admission rate, there will be 8300 Hispanics admitted during 2005-2007. If this number increases 328% by 2030 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003; Angel & Hogan, 1994), as projected by the Gerontological Society of America Task Force on Minority Issues on Gerontology and the National Academy of Sciences, over 26,000 of the 83,000 Arizona nursing home admissions every two years will be Hispanic. Nationwide, Hispanic admissions will increase until almost 10 of every 100 nursing home beds will be filled by such residents.
Nutrition care has not been studied adequately in controlled empirical investigations for minority populations in general, or particularly in regard to Hispanic residents. Although little is known about the nutrition status of Hispanic residents, nutrition deficiencies in the general resident population have been: historically frequent and unrecognized; the basis of adverse clinical outcomes (increased morbidity/mortality, decreased function and health status, and lower quality of life); and untreated even though opportunities for preventing or correcting malnutrition exist (Abassi & Rudman, 1994). It is anticipated that, as the number of Hispanic nursing home residents increases, so will the numbers who suffer from malnutrition, unless effective interventions can be identified. Design/Methods: Leininger's theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality (2001) provides a framework for this study. A two-group prospective design was used to describe differences in baseline measures between a sample of 75 Anglo nursing home residents and 6 self-identified Hispanic residents who participated in the study (N = 81). Results: Differences between groups in nutritional status (Body Mass Index and serum prealbumin), measures of depression (Geriatric Depression Scale), functional status (Katz ADL Index), and quality of life (Quality of Life - AD Scale) will be reported. Implications: Little is known about the nutrition status of Hispanic residents and unfortunately, nursing literature offers only one study that touches briefly on food service for Mexican-American elders. Thus, research is needed to fully understand the nutritional status and food preferences of Hispanic nursing home residents. With this knowledge, best practice interventions can be instituted within nursing homes. Funded by NIH/NINR: 1 R15 NR008382-01A1.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNutrition Status of Hispanic Nursing Home Residentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158034-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nutrition Status of Hispanic Nursing Home Residents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Crogan, Neva, PhD, APRN, BC, FNGNA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7418 E. Riverbank Loop, Tucson, AZ, 85715, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520-626-3770</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ncrogan@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bronwynne C. Evans, PhD, RN, CNS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a description of older Hispanic residents in nursing homes. This description was derived from the initial stages of an urgently needed investigation into the nutrition status of understudied Hispanic nursing home residents, to be used as a basis for generating future theory-driven interventions. Background: There are over 35 million Hispanics in the U.S. (12.5% of the population), a number that has grown almost 60% since 1990 (U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2000). The cohort over age 65 is expected to grow faster than any other racial or ethnic group (a 328% increase from 1999-2030), tripling in number to 13 million by 2050 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003; Angel &amp; Hogan, 1994). By 2030, one-quarter of the U. S. Hispanic population will be 80 or over, when the risk of disability increases dramatically (Espino, Mouton, Del Aguila, Parker, Lewis &amp; Miles, 2001). At least 4.5 million will require nursing home care because of disability due to dementia and chronic disease (Markides, Rudkin, Angel, &amp; Espino, 1997). Ten percent of the 83,000 Arizona nursing home residents admitted from 1999-2001 were Hispanic (Arizona Department of Economic Society, 2004). Assuming the same number of beds and the same Hispanic admission rate, there will be 8300 Hispanics admitted during 2005-2007. If this number increases 328% by 2030 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003; Angel &amp; Hogan, 1994), as projected by the Gerontological Society of America Task Force on Minority Issues on Gerontology and the National Academy of Sciences, over 26,000 of the 83,000 Arizona nursing home admissions every two years will be Hispanic. Nationwide, Hispanic admissions will increase until almost 10 of every 100 nursing home beds will be filled by such residents.<br/>Nutrition care has not been studied adequately in controlled empirical investigations for minority populations in general, or particularly in regard to Hispanic residents. Although little is known about the nutrition status of Hispanic residents, nutrition deficiencies in the general resident population have been: historically frequent and unrecognized; the basis of adverse clinical outcomes (increased morbidity/mortality, decreased function and health status, and lower quality of life); and untreated even though opportunities for preventing or correcting malnutrition exist (Abassi &amp; Rudman, 1994). It is anticipated that, as the number of Hispanic nursing home residents increases, so will the numbers who suffer from malnutrition, unless effective interventions can be identified. Design/Methods: Leininger's theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality (2001) provides a framework for this study. A two-group prospective design was used to describe differences in baseline measures between a sample of 75 Anglo nursing home residents and 6 self-identified Hispanic residents who participated in the study (N = 81). Results: Differences between groups in nutritional status (Body Mass Index and serum prealbumin), measures of depression (Geriatric Depression Scale), functional status (Katz ADL Index), and quality of life (Quality of Life - AD Scale) will be reported. Implications: Little is known about the nutrition status of Hispanic residents and unfortunately, nursing literature offers only one study that touches briefly on food service for Mexican-American elders. Thus, research is needed to fully understand the nutritional status and food preferences of Hispanic nursing home residents. With this knowledge, best practice interventions can be instituted within nursing homes. Funded by NIH/NINR: 1 R15 NR008382-01A1.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:26:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:26:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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