2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158035
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Motivating Exercise in Sedentary Mexican American Women
Abstract:
Motivating Exercise in Sedentary Mexican American Women
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Cromwell, Sandra, PhD, RN, FNGNA
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Arizona
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:7761 E. Linden Street, Tucson, AZ, 85715, USA
Contact Telephone:520-626-4736
Purpose: The study tested a theory-based intervention to promote long-term continuation of Physical Activity (PA) in sedentary, older (age> 55) Mexican-American women (MA's). Specifically, this study tested whether a community-based nursing intervention would result in long-term PA continuation (50 wks) at a level adequate to delay physical frailty. Theoretical Framework: Social Cognitive Theory (Bandura, 1997) states that people are motivated to initiate and maintain an action based on their outcome and self-efficacy (SE) expectations for the action. Outcome expectations can be positive (expected benefits) or negative (expected barriers). Increasing benefits and decreasing barriers to action serves to increase motivation to maintain the action over time. SE expectations and belief in the ability to execute an action influence decisions to engage in an action. Self-efficacy can be increased through personal success experiences, and positive feedback about accomplishments. Increasing SE increases motivation for repetition (continuation) of the action. Methods: This study had a 2 group longitudinal design with subjects followed for 50 weeks. All subjects (N=58) attended a 10 week Tai Chi Course. Intervention subjects (N=30) received: repeated (6 times) feedback on changes in 6 physical ability measures; feedback on attendance, and 2 teaching/counseling sessions addressing the benefits of PA and lifestyle modification to incorporate PA. Comparison subjects (N=28) represent the usual treatment in an exercise course. Model variables were measured 5 times over 50 weeks. Results: Groups were comparable at baseline on all measured variables. Perceived Benefits & Barriers: ANOVA testing found a significant time and time by group effect with intervention subjects, increasing in Benefits and decreasing in barriers over time while comparison subjects remained the same. Exercise Self Efficacy: An instrument ceiling effect negated significant findings. Continuation Outcomes: Calendar data showed no group differences during the 4 weeks immediately following the course on frequency or amount of PA. However, during the last 4 weeks (Weeks 47-50), both the group difference in the number of hours (p= .006) and in number of days (p< .001) of PA were statistically significant. Frailty outcomes: Significant group differences in Objective ADL/IADL, and in 3 of the 6 Objective PA Outcomes (grip strength, wall push-ups, chair raises) were found at 50 weeks. Implications: National recommendations for health benefits from exercise are at least 5 days per week for 30 minutes per day. Many (61%) intervention subjects obtained or surpassed these recommendations, and clearly, the control subjects did not (met by 33% for hours and 14% for days). Given the initially sedentary nature of this sample, it is interesting to note that both frequency and amount of exercise increased for intervention, and decreased for Comparison subjects over time, although this difference is not statistically significant. Funded by: NRO7626.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMotivating Exercise in Sedentary Mexican American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158035-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Motivating Exercise in Sedentary Mexican American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cromwell, Sandra, PhD, RN, FNGNA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7761 E. Linden Street, Tucson, AZ, 85715, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520-626-4736</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cromwell@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The study tested a theory-based intervention to promote long-term continuation of Physical Activity (PA) in sedentary, older (age&gt; 55) Mexican-American women (MA's). Specifically, this study tested whether a community-based nursing intervention would result in long-term PA continuation (50 wks) at a level adequate to delay physical frailty. Theoretical Framework: Social Cognitive Theory (Bandura, 1997) states that people are motivated to initiate and maintain an action based on their outcome and self-efficacy (SE) expectations for the action. Outcome expectations can be positive (expected benefits) or negative (expected barriers). Increasing benefits and decreasing barriers to action serves to increase motivation to maintain the action over time. SE expectations and belief in the ability to execute an action influence decisions to engage in an action. Self-efficacy can be increased through personal success experiences, and positive feedback about accomplishments. Increasing SE increases motivation for repetition (continuation) of the action. Methods: This study had a 2 group longitudinal design with subjects followed for 50 weeks. All subjects (N=58) attended a 10 week Tai Chi Course. Intervention subjects (N=30) received: repeated (6 times) feedback on changes in 6 physical ability measures; feedback on attendance, and 2 teaching/counseling sessions addressing the benefits of PA and lifestyle modification to incorporate PA. Comparison subjects (N=28) represent the usual treatment in an exercise course. Model variables were measured 5 times over 50 weeks. Results: Groups were comparable at baseline on all measured variables. Perceived Benefits &amp; Barriers: ANOVA testing found a significant time and time by group effect with intervention subjects, increasing in Benefits and decreasing in barriers over time while comparison subjects remained the same. Exercise Self Efficacy: An instrument ceiling effect negated significant findings. Continuation Outcomes: Calendar data showed no group differences during the 4 weeks immediately following the course on frequency or amount of PA. However, during the last 4 weeks (Weeks 47-50), both the group difference in the number of hours (p= .006) and in number of days (p&lt; .001) of PA were statistically significant. Frailty outcomes: Significant group differences in Objective ADL/IADL, and in 3 of the 6 Objective PA Outcomes (grip strength, wall push-ups, chair raises) were found at 50 weeks. Implications: National recommendations for health benefits from exercise are at least 5 days per week for 30 minutes per day. Many (61%) intervention subjects obtained or surpassed these recommendations, and clearly, the control subjects did not (met by 33% for hours and 14% for days). Given the initially sedentary nature of this sample, it is interesting to note that both frequency and amount of exercise increased for intervention, and decreased for Comparison subjects over time, although this difference is not statistically significant. Funded by: NRO7626.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:26:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:26:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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