2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158036
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implications for Practice: Graduate Nursing Students' Worldview
Abstract:
Implications for Practice: Graduate Nursing Students' Worldview
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Crow, Karine, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Arizona University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:PO Box 808, Ganado, AZ, 86505, USA
Contact Telephone:928-755-3550
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report results of a secondary analysis of data that examined outcomes of the Advanced Practice Nurse program. The practice implications of health care provision related to worldviews and cultural perspectives emerged as a theme in this analysis.
Methods: This study used a qualitative phenomenological methodology. All APN graduates (N=41) who were in practice at least one year following graduation from the APN program were invited to participate in an individual interview or a focus group. Fourteen individual interviews and five focus groups were conducted. Seven of ten Rural Health Specialist (RHS) and 23 of 31 Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) graduates participated in the study. Audio tapes of the interviews were transcribed verbatim and then reviewed for accuracy. Two researchers independently read the narrative-text analogs and then discussed them to gain consensual validation of findings. The practice implications of health care provision related to world views and cultural perspectives emerged. The Crow worldview continuum model and Awareness Spectrum adapted from A Winning Balance Program was used to assess student world view and cultural perspective. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: It is known that health care providers' worldview, cultural and ethnic background strongly influence nursing care provided. Since, the lack of minority health professionals compounds the nation's persistent racial and health disparities and enrollment of racial and ethnic minorities in nursing has stagnated, it is essential that nursing graduates develop cultural care practices. Assessments of graduated nurses' worldview and cultural awareness provides insight into their practice and allows faculty to evaluate the curriculum for strengths and growth areas needed to promote a more competent multicultural perspective in health care provision. Results: All interviews were analyzed to identify practice and its relation to verbally expressed worldviews and cultural awareness. Responses in the interviews and focus groups demonstrated worldview perspective and cultural awareness. Students were found throughout the continuum related to both worldview and cultural awareness. Exemplars of stated practice outcomes and the cultural awareness and worldview perspectives are provided. The more self-aware students demonstrated through their discussion of their practice activities a more multicultural perspective in health care provision. Conclusions: Analysis of stated practice as influenced by the nurse's worldview and health beliefs demonstrates that they have been able to provide effective nursing care that is more in concert with the client's perspective.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplications for Practice: Graduate Nursing Students' Worldviewen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158036-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Implications for Practice: Graduate Nursing Students' Worldview</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Crow, Karine, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Arizona University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 808, Ganado, AZ, 86505, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">928-755-3550</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">karine.crow@nau.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report results of a secondary analysis of data that examined outcomes of the Advanced Practice Nurse program. The practice implications of health care provision related to worldviews and cultural perspectives emerged as a theme in this analysis.<br/>Methods: This study used a qualitative phenomenological methodology. All APN graduates (N=41) who were in practice at least one year following graduation from the APN program were invited to participate in an individual interview or a focus group. Fourteen individual interviews and five focus groups were conducted. Seven of ten Rural Health Specialist (RHS) and 23 of 31 Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) graduates participated in the study. Audio tapes of the interviews were transcribed verbatim and then reviewed for accuracy. Two researchers independently read the narrative-text analogs and then discussed them to gain consensual validation of findings. The practice implications of health care provision related to world views and cultural perspectives emerged. The Crow worldview continuum model and Awareness Spectrum adapted from A Winning Balance Program was used to assess student world view and cultural perspective. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: It is known that health care providers' worldview, cultural and ethnic background strongly influence nursing care provided. Since, the lack of minority health professionals compounds the nation's persistent racial and health disparities and enrollment of racial and ethnic minorities in nursing has stagnated, it is essential that nursing graduates develop cultural care practices. Assessments of graduated nurses' worldview and cultural awareness provides insight into their practice and allows faculty to evaluate the curriculum for strengths and growth areas needed to promote a more competent multicultural perspective in health care provision. Results: All interviews were analyzed to identify practice and its relation to verbally expressed worldviews and cultural awareness. Responses in the interviews and focus groups demonstrated worldview perspective and cultural awareness. Students were found throughout the continuum related to both worldview and cultural awareness. Exemplars of stated practice outcomes and the cultural awareness and worldview perspectives are provided. The more self-aware students demonstrated through their discussion of their practice activities a more multicultural perspective in health care provision. Conclusions: Analysis of stated practice as influenced by the nurse's worldview and health beliefs demonstrates that they have been able to provide effective nursing care that is more in concert with the client's perspective.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:26:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:26:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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