2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158037
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Descriptive Analysis of Montana Disaster Nurse Volunteers
Abstract:
Descriptive Analysis of Montana Disaster Nurse Volunteers
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Danielson, Lianna, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University-Bozeman
Title:Graduate Student/Teaching Assistant
Contact Address:415 Lake Loop Drive, Kalispell, MT, 59901, USA
Co-Authors:Sandra W. Kuntz, PhD, RN
Purpose/Aims: This study describes the "early adopters" of a system developed to recruit and train nurses willing to participate in a local, regional, or statewide disaster. A key component of public health disaster plans includes mass care, mass vaccine and pharmaceutical distribution clinics, and surge capacity. System partners (Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS), Indian Health Service, Montana Hospital Association, Montana Nurse's Association, American Red Cross of Montana, and the Montana Board of Nursing) within the state collaborated to recruit nurse volunteers and develop a sustainable database to meet staffing needs of local rural/frontier jurisdictions during events that overwhelm existing resources. Specific aims of this study were to (a) describe the "early adopte" Montana nurse volunteers by county of residence, license classification, type of experience and volunteer willingness and (b) determine "gaps" in volunteerism among nurses based on type of county (frontier, rural, urban), region (by zip code), license classification, and type of experience. Theoretical Framework: Rogers (1995) diffusion of innovations theory serves as the organizing framework for this study. The nurses, as "early adopters," demonstrated immediate response, motivation, and commitment through their willingness to be contacted for training and to help the citizens of their community in the event of a disaster. Methods: The Montana Board of Nursing distributed paper/pencil Nurse Alert System (NAS) application forms to 15,000 nurses during the 2004 re-licensure period. Nurses were provided an explanatory information sheet and given an opportunity to return the application to a post office box managed by Montana Red Cross nurse volunteers. Nurses (RN, LPN, APRN) were asked to indicate their area of specialty and specific interest in volunteerism in the event of a local, regional, or statewide disaster. The application data was entered into a secure Microsoft Word Access database. Names and identifiers were removed prior to transferring the data to SPSS for Windows for secondary data descriptive analysis of counts, frequencies, and means as well as chi square and t-tests to examine differences and trends. Results: Of the 15,000 re-licensing nurses, 1300 (8.6%) registered for inclusion in the Montana NAS. Demographic characteristics and information regarding population density area, license type, and service interests of "early adopters" of a nurse volunteer system will be shared with conference attendees. The next generation of volunteers will apply through an online registration system created by Gold Systems, Inc. of Salt Lake City and maintained in the future by Department of Public Health and Human Services. Implications: Nurse Alert Systems are in place in Georgia, Colorado, and Alaska. The hurricanes in September/October in the south point to the importance of a prepared and trained workforce. Over 33,000 health professionals volunteered through the Department of Health and Human Services sign up system after hurricane Katrina. Unfortunately, few were actually ready for deployment. There is a need for states to organize systems to pre-train and pre-register volunteers willing to contribute during and after a disaster. Reference: Rogers, E. (1995). Diffusion of innovations (4th ed.). New York: The Free Press.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDescriptive Analysis of Montana Disaster Nurse Volunteersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158037-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Descriptive Analysis of Montana Disaster Nurse Volunteers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Danielson, Lianna, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University-Bozeman</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate Student/Teaching Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">415 Lake Loop Drive, Kalispell, MT, 59901, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ldanielson@mymail.montana.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sandra W. Kuntz, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: This study describes the &quot;early adopters&quot; of a system developed to recruit and train nurses willing to participate in a local, regional, or statewide disaster. A key component of public health disaster plans includes mass care, mass vaccine and pharmaceutical distribution clinics, and surge capacity. System partners (Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS), Indian Health Service, Montana Hospital Association, Montana Nurse's Association, American Red Cross of Montana, and the Montana Board of Nursing) within the state collaborated to recruit nurse volunteers and develop a sustainable database to meet staffing needs of local rural/frontier jurisdictions during events that overwhelm existing resources. Specific aims of this study were to (a) describe the &quot;early adopte&quot; Montana nurse volunteers by county of residence, license classification, type of experience and volunteer willingness and (b) determine &quot;gaps&quot; in volunteerism among nurses based on type of county (frontier, rural, urban), region (by zip code), license classification, and type of experience. Theoretical Framework: Rogers (1995) diffusion of innovations theory serves as the organizing framework for this study. The nurses, as &quot;early adopters,&quot; demonstrated immediate response, motivation, and commitment through their willingness to be contacted for training and to help the citizens of their community in the event of a disaster. Methods: The Montana Board of Nursing distributed paper/pencil Nurse Alert System (NAS) application forms to 15,000 nurses during the 2004 re-licensure period. Nurses were provided an explanatory information sheet and given an opportunity to return the application to a post office box managed by Montana Red Cross nurse volunteers. Nurses (RN, LPN, APRN) were asked to indicate their area of specialty and specific interest in volunteerism in the event of a local, regional, or statewide disaster. The application data was entered into a secure Microsoft Word Access database. Names and identifiers were removed prior to transferring the data to SPSS for Windows for secondary data descriptive analysis of counts, frequencies, and means as well as chi square and t-tests to examine differences and trends. Results: Of the 15,000 re-licensing nurses, 1300 (8.6%) registered for inclusion in the Montana NAS. Demographic characteristics and information regarding population density area, license type, and service interests of &quot;early adopters&quot; of a nurse volunteer system will be shared with conference attendees. The next generation of volunteers will apply through an online registration system created by Gold Systems, Inc. of Salt Lake City and maintained in the future by Department of Public Health and Human Services. Implications: Nurse Alert Systems are in place in Georgia, Colorado, and Alaska. The hurricanes in September/October in the south point to the importance of a prepared and trained workforce. Over 33,000 health professionals volunteered through the Department of Health and Human Services sign up system after hurricane Katrina. Unfortunately, few were actually ready for deployment. There is a need for states to organize systems to pre-train and pre-register volunteers willing to contribute during and after a disaster. Reference: Rogers, E. (1995). Diffusion of innovations (4th ed.). New York: The Free Press.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:26:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:26:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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