2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158038
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Body Weight and Food Intake in Rats With and Without Estrogen
Abstract:
Body Weight and Food Intake in Rats With and Without Estrogen
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Deechakawan, Wimon, MSN, MS, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Pre-doctoral Student
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Contact Telephone:206-616-3942
Co-Authors:Eleanor F. Bond, PhD, RN, FAAN
Purpose: To describe body weight (BW), body weight gain (BWG), food intake (FI), and plasma leptin levels in ovariectomized (OVX) rats with an estrogen (E) supplement versus vehicle (V) treated controls. Background: Obesity is a global public health problem. Obese people have a higher risk of developing comorbid chronic illnesses, which in turn are associated with diminished quality of life, reduced productivity, and increased health care costs. Women are at increased risk for obesity but the mechanisms linking gender and weight gain are not delineated. While there are many links between sexual function and appetite, the relationships among estrogen levels, appetite, weight gain, and the appetite-related hormone are not understood. Methods: An experimental design was used comparing BW, BWG, FI, and plasma leptin levels in OVX-E and OVX-V adult female rats (n = 26). Rats were OVX then implanted with a pellet releasing 17 beta -estradiol 0.0952 mg/kg BW/day (OVX-E) or a vehicle (wax) pellet (OVX-V). Rat BW, BWG, and FI were recorded daily. Plasma leptin level was measured on day 21 post-OVX. Results: OVX-E rats gained significantly less weight than OVX-V rats (1.34 ñ 0.15 g/d vs. 4.38 ñ 0.23 g/d, p < 0.001). OVX-E rats also consumed less food than the OVX-V rats (16.03 ñ 0.31 g/d vs. 20.51 ñ 0.45 g/d, p < 0.001). There were no differences in BW or BWG pre-OVX. FI in OVX-E rats was slightly greater than that in OVX-V pre-OVX (17.86 ñ 0.37 g/d vs. 16.66 ñ 0.29 g/d, p = 0.017). Plasma leptin levels were not significantly different between OVX-E and OVX-V rats. Uterine atrophy in OVX-V confirmed estrogen status (Uterus weight, 52.00 ñ 0.01 mg, OVX-V; 258.00 ñ 0.02 mg, OVX-E; p < 0.001). Implications: These findings indicate that changes in ovarian hormone status are associated with altered BWG and FI in rats. There was no significant group difference in plasma leptin levels noted at day 21 in the current study; however, sampling at other time points could demonstrate differences. Additional work is merited exploring the relationships among variables including ovarian hormone status, appetite related hormones such as ghrelin and other neuropeptides, weight gain, appetite, and metabolism. Application of data from an animal model to humans requires careful evaluation and validation. Studies of appetite-related hormone levels, FI, and BWG in women of varying ovarian hormone status are needed. This study was funded by the Research and Intramural Funding Program (RIFP) and the Center for Women's Health and Gender Research (CWHGR), University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBody Weight and Food Intake in Rats With and Without Estrogenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158038-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Body Weight and Food Intake in Rats With and Without Estrogen</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Deechakawan, Wimon, MSN, MS, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Pre-doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-616-3942</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wimond@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Eleanor F. Bond, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To describe body weight (BW), body weight gain (BWG), food intake (FI), and plasma leptin levels in ovariectomized (OVX) rats with an estrogen (E) supplement versus vehicle (V) treated controls. Background: Obesity is a global public health problem. Obese people have a higher risk of developing comorbid chronic illnesses, which in turn are associated with diminished quality of life, reduced productivity, and increased health care costs. Women are at increased risk for obesity but the mechanisms linking gender and weight gain are not delineated. While there are many links between sexual function and appetite, the relationships among estrogen levels, appetite, weight gain, and the appetite-related hormone are not understood. Methods: An experimental design was used comparing BW, BWG, FI, and plasma leptin levels in OVX-E and OVX-V adult female rats (n = 26). Rats were OVX then implanted with a pellet releasing 17 beta -estradiol 0.0952 mg/kg BW/day (OVX-E) or a vehicle (wax) pellet (OVX-V). Rat BW, BWG, and FI were recorded daily. Plasma leptin level was measured on day 21 post-OVX. Results: OVX-E rats gained significantly less weight than OVX-V rats (1.34 &ntilde; 0.15 g/d vs. 4.38 &ntilde; 0.23 g/d, p &lt; 0.001). OVX-E rats also consumed less food than the OVX-V rats (16.03 &ntilde; 0.31 g/d vs. 20.51 &ntilde; 0.45 g/d, p &lt; 0.001). There were no differences in BW or BWG pre-OVX. FI in OVX-E rats was slightly greater than that in OVX-V pre-OVX (17.86 &ntilde; 0.37 g/d vs. 16.66 &ntilde; 0.29 g/d, p = 0.017). Plasma leptin levels were not significantly different between OVX-E and OVX-V rats. Uterine atrophy in OVX-V confirmed estrogen status (Uterus weight, 52.00 &ntilde; 0.01 mg, OVX-V; 258.00 &ntilde; 0.02 mg, OVX-E; p &lt; 0.001). Implications: These findings indicate that changes in ovarian hormone status are associated with altered BWG and FI in rats. There was no significant group difference in plasma leptin levels noted at day 21 in the current study; however, sampling at other time points could demonstrate differences. Additional work is merited exploring the relationships among variables including ovarian hormone status, appetite related hormones such as ghrelin and other neuropeptides, weight gain, appetite, and metabolism. Application of data from an animal model to humans requires careful evaluation and validation. Studies of appetite-related hormone levels, FI, and BWG in women of varying ovarian hormone status are needed. This study was funded by the Research and Intramural Funding Program (RIFP) and the Center for Women's Health and Gender Research (CWHGR), University of Washington, Seattle, WA.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:26:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:26:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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