2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158039
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Raising Admission Standards: Impact on Ethnic Diversity of BSN Graduates
Abstract:
Raising Admission Standards: Impact on Ethnic Diversity of BSN Graduates
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:DeLapp, Tina, RN, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alaska Anchorage
Title:Professor Emeritus
Contact Address:13101 Elmore Rd., Anchorage, AK, 99516-2910, USA
Contact Telephone:907-786-4571
Background: The worsening nursing shortage has resulted in the implementation of numerous strategies designed to increase the number of individuals entering and graduating from basic nursing education programs. Advertising campaigns have resulted in increased applications to nursing programs, while programs have expanded enrollments. At the University of Alaska Anchorage, which has for many years admitted all applicants who meet specified admission requirements, enrollment expansion efforts resulted in shifting the baccalaureate program to a trimester system and increasing the number of students admitted to each admission cohort from 32 to 40 students; as a result, annual admissions rose from 64 to 120 students. Despite expansion efforts, by Fall 2004 increased interest in nursing careers resulted in filling of all admission cohorts through the Fall 2006 semester. In an effort to enable highly qualified students to gain entry into the clinical major more rapidly and to deal with faculty perception that the faster pace of the program was leading to increased attrition, faculty considered increasing admission standards.
Purposes: The purposes of this study were to: 1) identify demographic and academic factors that differentiated students who did and did not complete the baccalaureate nursing program; 2) examine the impact of the trimester schedule on student success; and 3) determine the impact of increasing the required admission GPA from 2.7 to 3.0 on the ethnic diversity of the nursing graduates. Methods: The records of 438 students admitted to the baccalaureate clinical major who graduated or were scheduled to graduate from Fall 1999-2004 were examined retrospectively. Data required to address the purposes of the study were extracted and subjected to analysis. Results: Students who did and did not graduate did not differ significantly with regard to gender, ethnicity, parents' educational achievement, admission GPA, or number of enrollments in all pre-requisite science courses. There was a slight significant difference in the science GPA of successful (SGPA=2.91) and unsuccessful students (SGPA=2.63) (t=-2.26; df= 432; p=.02). Also, unsuccessful students were significantly more likely to require more than one attempt to succeed in microbiology and statistics courses. No significant difference was observed in the graduation rates of students on the semester (89.8%) compared to those on the trimester schedule (94.8%) ( X square =3.150, df=1; p=.08). The ethnic diversity of actual graduates did not differ significantly to the ethnic diversity of the graduates who would have graduated from the program had the admission GPA been 3.0. However, under the higher GPA admission requirement, the number of minority graduates would have been reduced by 24, with the percentage reduction varying from 20-50% for specific ethnicities. Other findings included an overall attrition rate of only 8.4% over the previous eight years and a first time NCLEX pass rate of 91.8%; when graduates who performed successfully on NCLEX on either a first or second attempt, the pass rate rose to 98.8%. Implications: It is apparent that increasing admission requirements may impede goals to create an ethnically diverse nursing workforce. In the absence of clear evidence that students who meet more stringent admission requirements are more likely to be successful than less academically talented students, schools should consider focusing their efforts on expanding enrollments rather than on restricting access to the major.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRaising Admission Standards: Impact on Ethnic Diversity of BSN Graduatesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158039-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Raising Admission Standards: Impact on Ethnic Diversity of BSN Graduates</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">DeLapp, Tina, RN, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alaska Anchorage</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor Emeritus</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">13101 Elmore Rd., Anchorage, AK, 99516-2910, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">907-786-4571</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tdelapp@ak.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: The worsening nursing shortage has resulted in the implementation of numerous strategies designed to increase the number of individuals entering and graduating from basic nursing education programs. Advertising campaigns have resulted in increased applications to nursing programs, while programs have expanded enrollments. At the University of Alaska Anchorage, which has for many years admitted all applicants who meet specified admission requirements, enrollment expansion efforts resulted in shifting the baccalaureate program to a trimester system and increasing the number of students admitted to each admission cohort from 32 to 40 students; as a result, annual admissions rose from 64 to 120 students. Despite expansion efforts, by Fall 2004 increased interest in nursing careers resulted in filling of all admission cohorts through the Fall 2006 semester. In an effort to enable highly qualified students to gain entry into the clinical major more rapidly and to deal with faculty perception that the faster pace of the program was leading to increased attrition, faculty considered increasing admission standards.<br/>Purposes: The purposes of this study were to: 1) identify demographic and academic factors that differentiated students who did and did not complete the baccalaureate nursing program; 2) examine the impact of the trimester schedule on student success; and 3) determine the impact of increasing the required admission GPA from 2.7 to 3.0 on the ethnic diversity of the nursing graduates. Methods: The records of 438 students admitted to the baccalaureate clinical major who graduated or were scheduled to graduate from Fall 1999-2004 were examined retrospectively. Data required to address the purposes of the study were extracted and subjected to analysis. Results: Students who did and did not graduate did not differ significantly with regard to gender, ethnicity, parents' educational achievement, admission GPA, or number of enrollments in all pre-requisite science courses. There was a slight significant difference in the science GPA of successful (SGPA=2.91) and unsuccessful students (SGPA=2.63) (t=-2.26; df= 432; p=.02). Also, unsuccessful students were significantly more likely to require more than one attempt to succeed in microbiology and statistics courses. No significant difference was observed in the graduation rates of students on the semester (89.8%) compared to those on the trimester schedule (94.8%) ( X square =3.150, df=1; p=.08). The ethnic diversity of actual graduates did not differ significantly to the ethnic diversity of the graduates who would have graduated from the program had the admission GPA been 3.0. However, under the higher GPA admission requirement, the number of minority graduates would have been reduced by 24, with the percentage reduction varying from 20-50% for specific ethnicities. Other findings included an overall attrition rate of only 8.4% over the previous eight years and a first time NCLEX pass rate of 91.8%; when graduates who performed successfully on NCLEX on either a first or second attempt, the pass rate rose to 98.8%. Implications: It is apparent that increasing admission requirements may impede goals to create an ethnically diverse nursing workforce. In the absence of clear evidence that students who meet more stringent admission requirements are more likely to be successful than less academically talented students, schools should consider focusing their efforts on expanding enrollments rather than on restricting access to the major.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:26:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:26:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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