2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158041
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fatigue Scales in Cancer Survivors: Measurement Properties
Abstract:
Fatigue Scales in Cancer Survivors: Measurement Properties
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Dirksen, Shannon, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 872602, Tempe, AZ, 85287-2602, USA
Contact Telephone:480-965-4280
Co-Authors:Dana R. Epstein, PhD, RN; and Katie S. Cunningham, MA
Aims/Rationale: Fatigue is one of the most common and disturbing symptoms affecting quality of life in cancer survivors. Researchers investigating fatigue in this clinical population have used a variety of instruments both general and cancer specific, in quantifying its prevalence and effect on various study outcomes. As a result, there is currently no standardized method for measuring fatigue in cancer survivors. The purpose of this paper is to compare the measurement properties of two fatigue scales, The Fatigue Symptom Inventory (FSI) and the Profile of Mood States-Fatigue Scale (POMS-F), which were used in a pilot study examining the efficacy of a behavioral intervention (BI) for insomnia in breast cancer survivors. Methods: A sample of 72 women who were at least 3 months post completion of primary cancer treatment and without active disease participated in the study. Women were randomly assigned to either the BI or a component comparison (CC) group. Subjects completed both fatigue scales at pre-and post-treatment. The 13-item FSI was developed to measure the multiple dimensions of fatigue in cancer patients (Haan, 1998). The 7-item POMS-F measures fatigue severity only, specifically weariness and low energy (McNair, 1981). Both scales demonstrated good reliability and validity in prior studies with breast cancer patients. We included both scales to compare their measurement properties and ability to demonstrate a relationship between sleep and fatigue, and to guide our choice of a fatigue instrument in a larger future study. Results: Reliability for the total scales at pre-and post-treatment were .96, .96 (FSI) and .94, .95 (POMS-F), respectively. Data analysis included confirmatory factor analyses and nested models comparison on the factor loadings, and chi square statistics for the nested models to compare and assess significant loss of fit. The findings suggest the FSI may not perform well across time. Correlations of the POMS F with the 3 separate factors of the FSI at pre-and post-treatment revealed all values at p<.01. Both scales had a weak correlation with only one of the demographic variables (stage at diagnosis), and many strong correlations (p<.02) with the sleep variables. The strongest correlations (p<.000) for both scales were with the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) which is a 7-item Likert-type scale assessing patient perception of insomnia severity (Bastien et al., 2001). Implications: The study findings showed both scales were reliable and valid indices of fatigue. The FSI measures 3 dimensions of fatigue as compared to the one-dimensional POMS-F, which may appeal to some researchers. From a clinical utility perspective, the POMS has fewer items than the FSI; using the POMS would reduce participant burden. In summary, the decision of which fatigue scale to use in future may be driven by the study's conceptual definition of fatigue and number of measurement time points. Funded by the National Cancer Institute CA91869.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFatigue Scales in Cancer Survivors: Measurement Propertiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158041-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Fatigue Scales in Cancer Survivors: Measurement Properties</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dirksen, Shannon, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 872602, Tempe, AZ, 85287-2602, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">480-965-4280</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shannon.dirksen@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Dana R. Epstein, PhD, RN; and Katie S. Cunningham, MA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aims/Rationale: Fatigue is one of the most common and disturbing symptoms affecting quality of life in cancer survivors. Researchers investigating fatigue in this clinical population have used a variety of instruments both general and cancer specific, in quantifying its prevalence and effect on various study outcomes. As a result, there is currently no standardized method for measuring fatigue in cancer survivors. The purpose of this paper is to compare the measurement properties of two fatigue scales, The Fatigue Symptom Inventory (FSI) and the Profile of Mood States-Fatigue Scale (POMS-F), which were used in a pilot study examining the efficacy of a behavioral intervention (BI) for insomnia in breast cancer survivors. Methods: A sample of 72 women who were at least 3 months post completion of primary cancer treatment and without active disease participated in the study. Women were randomly assigned to either the BI or a component comparison (CC) group. Subjects completed both fatigue scales at pre-and post-treatment. The 13-item FSI was developed to measure the multiple dimensions of fatigue in cancer patients (Haan, 1998). The 7-item POMS-F measures fatigue severity only, specifically weariness and low energy (McNair, 1981). Both scales demonstrated good reliability and validity in prior studies with breast cancer patients. We included both scales to compare their measurement properties and ability to demonstrate a relationship between sleep and fatigue, and to guide our choice of a fatigue instrument in a larger future study. Results: Reliability for the total scales at pre-and post-treatment were .96, .96 (FSI) and .94, .95 (POMS-F), respectively. Data analysis included confirmatory factor analyses and nested models comparison on the factor loadings, and chi square statistics for the nested models to compare and assess significant loss of fit. The findings suggest the FSI may not perform well across time. Correlations of the POMS F with the 3 separate factors of the FSI at pre-and post-treatment revealed all values at p&lt;.01. Both scales had a weak correlation with only one of the demographic variables (stage at diagnosis), and many strong correlations (p&lt;.02) with the sleep variables. The strongest correlations (p&lt;.000) for both scales were with the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) which is a 7-item Likert-type scale assessing patient perception of insomnia severity (Bastien et al., 2001). Implications: The study findings showed both scales were reliable and valid indices of fatigue. The FSI measures 3 dimensions of fatigue as compared to the one-dimensional POMS-F, which may appeal to some researchers. From a clinical utility perspective, the POMS has fewer items than the FSI; using the POMS would reduce participant burden. In summary, the decision of which fatigue scale to use in future may be driven by the study's conceptual definition of fatigue and number of measurement time points. Funded by the National Cancer Institute CA91869.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:27:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:27:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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