2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158043
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescents - How Comfortable Really Are They With Their Own Sexuality?
Abstract:
Adolescents - How Comfortable Really Are They With Their Own Sexuality?
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Dougherty, Jacalyn, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Northern Colorado
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:4733 S. Jasper St., Aurora, CO, 80015, USA
Contact Telephone:970-351-1701
In spite of recent downturns in the incidence of adolescent pregnancy, childbearing, fatherhood, and induced abortion in this country, rates for these phenomena in American adolescents continue to be among the highest in the world for developed nations (Darroch, Singh, & Frost, 2001). Adolescence researchers propose that such fertility-related behaviors are closely associated with how adolescents feel about themselves as sexual persons, but little research addresses the factors that shape teens' perceptions of themselves as sexual and how these perceptions, in turn, influence their actual sexual behavior and the attitudes they hold toward birth control. As part of a larger study investigating the role of adolescents' comfort with their own sexuality as a mediating influence between several predictors that have been empirically and theoretically associated with early parenthood, data were gathered at school from 365 adolescents (215 females and 150 males) in grades 9 through 12 attending a public high school. This research reports findings about the teens' level of comfort with their own sexuality assessed by a 16-item self-report measure ( a = .90 for both sexes). The How I Feel About Me as a Teenager tool tapped five domains: 1) perceived physical and emotional readiness for sexual intercourse; 2) comfort with sexual exploration as a normative aspect of adolescence; 3) a view of self as having sexual agency; 4) the view of self as a sexual object; and 5) comfort with one's own level of sexual behavior. Consistent with our hypothesis that socialization practices and greater cultural acknowledgement of male's sexuality in this country would contribute to their higher level of comfort with their own sexuality, we found that adolescent males did indeed report greater comfort with their sexuality than did their female peers (F(1,353) = 29.56, p < .001, N square = .08), Ms(SDs) = 3.06 (.38) vs. 2.69 (.65), respectively. This finding provides empirical support for anecdotal evidence that males tend to experience more acceptance and greater visibility of their sexuality than do females. This is consistent with research by contemporary ethnographers and other researchers (e.g., Fine, 1997; Lawson, 1993; Tolman, 2002: Tolman & Higgins, 1997; Tschann & Adler, 1997) who mote that females risk being labeled as "sluts" or "bad girls" when they acknowledge or act on their own sexuality. This study also reports on relationships between adolescents' comfort with their own sexuality and a variety of other contextual, demographic, cultural, and intrapersonal factors that we hypothesized would be either significantly positively or negatively associated with teens' comfort with themselves as sexual persons. As expected, we found that growing up in a non-intact household, knowing more family and friends who were or had been teen parents, currently being in a steady relationship, reporting greater agreement with messages in the larger culture that encourage sexual behavior in adolescence, endorsing greater agreement with sex-stereotypic behavior for males and females [for males only], and having a stronger masculine gender role orientation were all significantly and positively correlated with comfort (ps < .05). Further, as hypothesized, we found level of religiosity for both males and females to be significantly negatively associated with adolescents' comfort with their own sexuality (ps < .05 ), but did not find an expected significant correlation between comfort and the endorsement of a feminine gender role orientation (ps > .05) for either males or females.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescents - How Comfortable Really Are They With Their Own Sexuality?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158043-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adolescents - How Comfortable Really Are They With Their Own Sexuality?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dougherty, Jacalyn, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Northern Colorado</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4733 S. Jasper St., Aurora, CO, 80015, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">970-351-1701</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jacalyn.dougherty@unco.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In spite of recent downturns in the incidence of adolescent pregnancy, childbearing, fatherhood, and induced abortion in this country, rates for these phenomena in American adolescents continue to be among the highest in the world for developed nations (Darroch, Singh, &amp; Frost, 2001). Adolescence researchers propose that such fertility-related behaviors are closely associated with how adolescents feel about themselves as sexual persons, but little research addresses the factors that shape teens' perceptions of themselves as sexual and how these perceptions, in turn, influence their actual sexual behavior and the attitudes they hold toward birth control. As part of a larger study investigating the role of adolescents' comfort with their own sexuality as a mediating influence between several predictors that have been empirically and theoretically associated with early parenthood, data were gathered at school from 365 adolescents (215 females and 150 males) in grades 9 through 12 attending a public high school. This research reports findings about the teens' level of comfort with their own sexuality assessed by a 16-item self-report measure ( a = .90 for both sexes). The How I Feel About Me as a Teenager tool tapped five domains: 1) perceived physical and emotional readiness for sexual intercourse; 2) comfort with sexual exploration as a normative aspect of adolescence; 3) a view of self as having sexual agency; 4) the view of self as a sexual object; and 5) comfort with one's own level of sexual behavior. Consistent with our hypothesis that socialization practices and greater cultural acknowledgement of male's sexuality in this country would contribute to their higher level of comfort with their own sexuality, we found that adolescent males did indeed report greater comfort with their sexuality than did their female peers (F(1,353) = 29.56, p &lt; .001, N square = .08), Ms(SDs) = 3.06 (.38) vs. 2.69 (.65), respectively. This finding provides empirical support for anecdotal evidence that males tend to experience more acceptance and greater visibility of their sexuality than do females. This is consistent with research by contemporary ethnographers and other researchers (e.g., Fine, 1997; Lawson, 1993; Tolman, 2002: Tolman &amp; Higgins, 1997; Tschann &amp; Adler, 1997) who mote that females risk being labeled as &quot;sluts&quot; or &quot;bad girls&quot; when they acknowledge or act on their own sexuality. This study also reports on relationships between adolescents' comfort with their own sexuality and a variety of other contextual, demographic, cultural, and intrapersonal factors that we hypothesized would be either significantly positively or negatively associated with teens' comfort with themselves as sexual persons. As expected, we found that growing up in a non-intact household, knowing more family and friends who were or had been teen parents, currently being in a steady relationship, reporting greater agreement with messages in the larger culture that encourage sexual behavior in adolescence, endorsing greater agreement with sex-stereotypic behavior for males and females [for males only], and having a stronger masculine gender role orientation were all significantly and positively correlated with comfort (ps &lt; .05). Further, as hypothesized, we found level of religiosity for both males and females to be significantly negatively associated with adolescents' comfort with their own sexuality (ps &lt; .05 ), but did not find an expected significant correlation between comfort and the endorsement of a feminine gender role orientation (ps &gt; .05) for either males or females.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:27:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:27:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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