2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158045
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A New Look at Children's Fears: Using Mixed Methods
Abstract:
A New Look at Children's Fears: Using Mixed Methods
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Driessnack, Martha, PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Postdoctoral Fellow
Contact Address:100 Market Street, Unit 309, Des Moines, IA, 50309-4764, USA
Background: Fear critically affects children's responses to health care interventions and environments. Unidentified fears can have detrimental effects on children's learning, social skills and self-concept. Fears that remain unresolved or benumbed have recently been implicated in the development of mental health disorders and violent behavior in children. To date, studies about children and fear have been quantitative in their approach to data collection and analysis and focused primarily on the typology and incidence of the referents of fear. Purpose: The purpose of this mixed methods (qualitative + quantitative) study was to examine how the nature of information from children about their fears differs when it is elicited and analyzed using a qualitative approach to inquiry compared with the information elicited from the same children using the more traditional quantitative approach to fear. Method: Twenty-two healthy school children, ages seven and eight years, of mixed ethnicity and socioeconomic status participated. The qualitative approach to inquiry included a draw and tell dialogue where children were asked to draw and then tell about their fears. Their stories were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and then analyzed using both narrative and thematic analysis. The supplemental quantitative inquiry had the same children complete an established self-report survey, based on known fear referents, the Fear Survey Schedule for Children (FSSC-R). The children's FSSC-R scores were then compared to existing normative data for their age group. Findings: The qualitative approach to data collection and analysis focused attention on the mediating influence of the circumstances needed for children to experience fear. The children's stories consistently identified their fear experience as times when they were alone, unprepared for what was happening, unable to summon help from within or from others, and with no foreseeable way out. In contrast to previous studies, the referents of fear (e.g., a spider, a masked man or the dark) were almost incidental to their storied experiences. The quantitative approach to data collection and analysis identified no significant differences between the study sample and normative sample on the FSSC-R's Total score or the sub-scale scores for factors Failure & Criticism, The Unknown, Minor Injury & Small Animals, and Medical Fears. However, mean sub-scale scores for the factor Danger & Death and mean Overall Fearfulness scores were significantly higher than normative sample scores which were from 15 years ago. Implications: Together these two approaches provide a new look at children's fear experiences that has the potential to shift the current research agenda and focus and inform the development of much needed interventional efforts. This study was part of a doctoral dissertation supported by the OHSU School of Nursing NRSA T32 NR0707061, Dean's Academic Award for Doctoral Dissertation, and an ELCA Colleges and University Administrative Grant.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA New Look at Children's Fears: Using Mixed Methodsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158045-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A New Look at Children's Fears: Using Mixed Methods</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Driessnack, Martha, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">100 Market Street, Unit 309, Des Moines, IA, 50309-4764, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">martha-driessnack@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Fear critically affects children's responses to health care interventions and environments. Unidentified fears can have detrimental effects on children's learning, social skills and self-concept. Fears that remain unresolved or benumbed have recently been implicated in the development of mental health disorders and violent behavior in children. To date, studies about children and fear have been quantitative in their approach to data collection and analysis and focused primarily on the typology and incidence of the referents of fear. Purpose: The purpose of this mixed methods (qualitative + quantitative) study was to examine how the nature of information from children about their fears differs when it is elicited and analyzed using a qualitative approach to inquiry compared with the information elicited from the same children using the more traditional quantitative approach to fear. Method: Twenty-two healthy school children, ages seven and eight years, of mixed ethnicity and socioeconomic status participated. The qualitative approach to inquiry included a draw and tell dialogue where children were asked to draw and then tell about their fears. Their stories were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and then analyzed using both narrative and thematic analysis. The supplemental quantitative inquiry had the same children complete an established self-report survey, based on known fear referents, the Fear Survey Schedule for Children (FSSC-R). The children's FSSC-R scores were then compared to existing normative data for their age group. Findings: The qualitative approach to data collection and analysis focused attention on the mediating influence of the circumstances needed for children to experience fear. The children's stories consistently identified their fear experience as times when they were alone, unprepared for what was happening, unable to summon help from within or from others, and with no foreseeable way out. In contrast to previous studies, the referents of fear (e.g., a spider, a masked man or the dark) were almost incidental to their storied experiences. The quantitative approach to data collection and analysis identified no significant differences between the study sample and normative sample on the FSSC-R's Total score or the sub-scale scores for factors Failure &amp; Criticism, The Unknown, Minor Injury &amp; Small Animals, and Medical Fears. However, mean sub-scale scores for the factor Danger &amp; Death and mean Overall Fearfulness scores were significantly higher than normative sample scores which were from 15 years ago. Implications: Together these two approaches provide a new look at children's fear experiences that has the potential to shift the current research agenda and focus and inform the development of much needed interventional efforts. This study was part of a doctoral dissertation supported by the OHSU School of Nursing NRSA T32 NR0707061, Dean's Academic Award for Doctoral Dissertation, and an ELCA Colleges and University Administrative Grant.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:27:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:27:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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