2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158046
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Children's Stories About Fear: A Linguistic Approach to Narrative Analysis
Abstract:
Children's Stories About Fear: A Linguistic Approach to Narrative Analysis
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Driessnack, Martha, PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Postdoctoral Fellow
Contact Address:100 Market Street, Unit 309, Des Moines, IA, 50309-4764, USA
Background: Telling stories is one of the first forms of discourse learned by young children. The traditional approach to the analysis of stories has primarily focused on its content or resultant themes. A linguistic approach to narrative analysis extends the examination beyond a story's content and focuses not only on the underlying structure of the story, or why the story is told a certain way, but also on how the structure contributes to the story's overall meaning. This approach may be particularly relevant in our understanding of young children, who are in the throws of developing their language capability. Fear was selected as the story focus because it is a part of every child's life experience and often critically affects a child's response to health care interventions and environments. Further, unidentified fears can have detrimental effects on children's learning, social skills, and self-concept and have more recently been implicated in the development of mental health disorders and violent behavior in children. Method: Twenty-two healthy school children, ages seven and eight years, and of mixed ethnicity and socio-economic status, were asked to draw and then tell about their biggest fears. Each story was elicited using an informal conversation map and then transcribed in its entirety, checked for accuracy, parsed into clauses, and identified as one of the following six narrative elements: abstract, orientation, complicating action, evaluation, resolution, or coda. The resultant linguistic structure or sequence was then compared to the typical personal event narrative structure or sequencing used by children in this age group. Findings: The children's stories about their fear experiences revealed a characteristic and distinctly different linguistic structure or sequence. The most striking variation was the consistent overuse of orienting clauses and the dominance of the evaluative element of negation, which addresses what is not right. The stories' action clauses were uncharacteristically suspended in the present tense, rather than the more typical past tense, and there was a complete absence or omission of resolution clauses. The resulting linguistic structure created a consistent path to each child's experience of fear, rather than through it, and seemed to suspend the listener linguistically in the story alongside the narrator as if to invite assistance in its resolution. Implications: The traditional linguistic analysis of young children's stories appears to provide a useful adjunctive analytical approach to the understanding of children?s storied experience of fear and may provide insights into other storied experiences as well. This study was part of a doctoral dissertation supported by the OHSU School of Nursing NRSA T32 NR0707061, Dean's Academic Award for Doctoral Dissertation, and an ELCA Colleges and University Administrative Study Grant.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChildren's Stories About Fear: A Linguistic Approach to Narrative Analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158046-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Children's Stories About Fear: A Linguistic Approach to Narrative Analysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Driessnack, Martha, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">100 Market Street, Unit 309, Des Moines, IA, 50309-4764, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">martha-driessnack@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Telling stories is one of the first forms of discourse learned by young children. The traditional approach to the analysis of stories has primarily focused on its content or resultant themes. A linguistic approach to narrative analysis extends the examination beyond a story's content and focuses not only on the underlying structure of the story, or why the story is told a certain way, but also on how the structure contributes to the story's overall meaning. This approach may be particularly relevant in our understanding of young children, who are in the throws of developing their language capability. Fear was selected as the story focus because it is a part of every child's life experience and often critically affects a child's response to health care interventions and environments. Further, unidentified fears can have detrimental effects on children's learning, social skills, and self-concept and have more recently been implicated in the development of mental health disorders and violent behavior in children. Method: Twenty-two healthy school children, ages seven and eight years, and of mixed ethnicity and socio-economic status, were asked to draw and then tell about their biggest fears. Each story was elicited using an informal conversation map and then transcribed in its entirety, checked for accuracy, parsed into clauses, and identified as one of the following six narrative elements: abstract, orientation, complicating action, evaluation, resolution, or coda. The resultant linguistic structure or sequence was then compared to the typical personal event narrative structure or sequencing used by children in this age group. Findings: The children's stories about their fear experiences revealed a characteristic and distinctly different linguistic structure or sequence. The most striking variation was the consistent overuse of orienting clauses and the dominance of the evaluative element of negation, which addresses what is not right. The stories' action clauses were uncharacteristically suspended in the present tense, rather than the more typical past tense, and there was a complete absence or omission of resolution clauses. The resulting linguistic structure created a consistent path to each child's experience of fear, rather than through it, and seemed to suspend the listener linguistically in the story alongside the narrator as if to invite assistance in its resolution. Implications: The traditional linguistic analysis of young children's stories appears to provide a useful adjunctive analytical approach to the understanding of children?s storied experience of fear and may provide insights into other storied experiences as well. This study was part of a doctoral dissertation supported by the OHSU School of Nursing NRSA T32 NR0707061, Dean's Academic Award for Doctoral Dissertation, and an ELCA Colleges and University Administrative Study Grant.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:27:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:27:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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