2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158047
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Disaster Preparedness of Colorado Nurses
Abstract:
Disaster Preparedness of Colorado Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Duarte, Victor, BS, BSN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Northern Colorado
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:1914 Falcon Ridge Drive, Fort Collins, CO, 80528, USA
Contact Telephone:970-225-6773
Co-Authors:Linda C. Haynes, PhD, RN and Dawn James, BSN, RN
Purpose: The purposes of this research were to (1) identify gaps in nursing education curricula and (2) ascertain how prepared and confident practicing nurses in Colorado presently feel about disaster preparedness if called to respond to a mass casualty event. Background: The history of disasters befalling humanity has been documented since the beginning of time. Natural disasters and wars have been common place. However, new threats have emerged in recent history including weapons of mass destruction and bioterrorism. In a recent letter to Health and Human Services Secretary, Tommy Thompson, Senator Joseph Lieberman wrote "the bioterrorism preparedness knowledge gap is partly due to a general lack of availability of scientifically and medically relevant curriculum material developed for practicing public health and medical professionals, groups that are in the greatest need of this information" (Dembek, Iton, Hansen, 2005). The International Nursing Coalition for Mass Casualty Education has concluded many currently practicing nurses have not received adequate training or experience in emergency preparedness (Rosseter, 2002). Methods: Two sample populations were used. The first was a convenience sample of registered nurses currently employed in a variety of practice settings in Colorado. Participants were contacted via e-mail and invited to complete a needs assessment survey that explored the nurses' perceptions of individual disaster preparedness. Purposive sampling was used for the second sample of individuals who held key leadership positions in nursing education. Individuals in the second sample were contacted by telephone to elicit information regarding the amount and mechanism of inclusion of disaster preparedness content in current nursing curricula. Results: Data indicated that (1) none of the nursing schools surveyed provide disaster preparedness content as a stand alone course, (2) all schools indicated disaster preparedness content is presented haphazardly through curricular integration, (3) none of the schools indicated a plan to add disaster nursing to the core curricula, (4) practicing nurses reported that they had received little or no disaster nursing preparedness education while in nursing school, and (5) the level of confidence each nurse had with regard to disaster preparedness varied depending on continuing education courses, length of practice, age, level of education, type of nursing currently engaged in, geographic location, hours worked per week, and length of time since graduating from nursing school. Implications: In light of the information gathered, it is clear the current nursing workforce in Colorado is not prepared for the challenges which would befall the state in the event of a mass casualty event. The researchers recommend disaster education be fully, carefully, and clearly integrated into core nursing curricula.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDisaster Preparedness of Colorado Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158047-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Disaster Preparedness of Colorado Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Duarte, Victor, BS, BSN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Northern Colorado</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1914 Falcon Ridge Drive, Fort Collins, CO, 80528, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">970-225-6773</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">victord@comcast.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Linda C. Haynes, PhD, RN and Dawn James, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purposes of this research were to (1) identify gaps in nursing education curricula and (2) ascertain how prepared and confident practicing nurses in Colorado presently feel about disaster preparedness if called to respond to a mass casualty event. Background: The history of disasters befalling humanity has been documented since the beginning of time. Natural disasters and wars have been common place. However, new threats have emerged in recent history including weapons of mass destruction and bioterrorism. In a recent letter to Health and Human Services Secretary, Tommy Thompson, Senator Joseph Lieberman wrote &quot;the bioterrorism preparedness knowledge gap is partly due to a general lack of availability of scientifically and medically relevant curriculum material developed for practicing public health and medical professionals, groups that are in the greatest need of this information&quot; (Dembek, Iton, Hansen, 2005). The International Nursing Coalition for Mass Casualty Education has concluded many currently practicing nurses have not received adequate training or experience in emergency preparedness (Rosseter, 2002). Methods: Two sample populations were used. The first was a convenience sample of registered nurses currently employed in a variety of practice settings in Colorado. Participants were contacted via e-mail and invited to complete a needs assessment survey that explored the nurses' perceptions of individual disaster preparedness. Purposive sampling was used for the second sample of individuals who held key leadership positions in nursing education. Individuals in the second sample were contacted by telephone to elicit information regarding the amount and mechanism of inclusion of disaster preparedness content in current nursing curricula. Results: Data indicated that (1) none of the nursing schools surveyed provide disaster preparedness content as a stand alone course, (2) all schools indicated disaster preparedness content is presented haphazardly through curricular integration, (3) none of the schools indicated a plan to add disaster nursing to the core curricula, (4) practicing nurses reported that they had received little or no disaster nursing preparedness education while in nursing school, and (5) the level of confidence each nurse had with regard to disaster preparedness varied depending on continuing education courses, length of practice, age, level of education, type of nursing currently engaged in, geographic location, hours worked per week, and length of time since graduating from nursing school. Implications: In light of the information gathered, it is clear the current nursing workforce in Colorado is not prepared for the challenges which would befall the state in the event of a mass casualty event. The researchers recommend disaster education be fully, carefully, and clearly integrated into core nursing curricula.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:27:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:27:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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