2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158048
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relevant Nursing Leadership: An Evidence-Based Programmatic Response
Abstract:
Relevant Nursing Leadership: An Evidence-Based Programmatic Response
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Eddy, Linda, RN, PhD, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:22911 NE 42nd Court, Ridgefield, WA, 98642, USA
Contact Telephone:360-546-9625
Co-Authors:Dawn Doutrich, PhD, RN, CNS; Zana R. Higgs, PhD, RN; Janet Spuck, MS, RN
Background and Specific Aims: Community and student demand for stronger, more relevant nursing leadership graduate programs provided the impetus for this study. Insufficient numbers of nurse leaders and nurse leaders without appropriate competencies are problematic in an era of severe nursing shortage (Wolf, Bradle, & Nelson, 2005). Clearly, the quality of nursing leadership has a powerful impact on nurse retention (Maguire, Spencer, & Sabatier, 2004). The aims of the study were to uncover meaningful themes related to highly competent nursing leadership, and to identify strategies to move the knowledge gained into nursing leadership education and practice. Methods: Twenty three nursing leaders from a variety of Oregon and Washington healthcare settings gathered in five focus groups. Informants included unit managers, clinic managers, staff development professionals, and top-level administrators. A semi-structured interview guide was used to elicit meaningful aspects of highly competent nursing leadership. Themes were identified independently and during small group interpretive sessions. Analysis proceeded from identification of recurrent themes to discovery of paradigm cases. Results: Themes identified both affirmed and differed from previously published findings. Participants implored education to help potential nurse leaders understand that leadership is a vital nursing function. Essential competencies identified by participants included communication proficiencies, especially listening skills, relationship development, conflict resolution skills, and mentoring. Nurse leaders also felt the need for greater data management capability. In addition, facility with technological and fiscal resources was considered key as was the ability to develop and communicate a vision. [A leader needs to] "communicate that vision to others, and motivate and inspire them." Implications: Based on our findings, curricular revisions in our College of Nursing are being implemented and four masters courses related to nursing leadership are being updated. The findings have wider implications, however. Lessons from practice inform curricular decisions in undergraduate and graduate nursing programs, as well as influence the direction of continuing education offerings for nurse leaders. Nurse retention should be affected by increased numbers of nurse leaders grounded in practice and ready to provide vision for the future. Funded by the WSU Vancouver/SW Washington Medical Center Research Partnership in Healthcare.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelevant Nursing Leadership: An Evidence-Based Programmatic Responseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158048-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relevant Nursing Leadership: An Evidence-Based Programmatic Response</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Eddy, Linda, RN, PhD, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">22911 NE 42nd Court, Ridgefield, WA, 98642, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">360-546-9625</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eddy@vancouver.wsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Dawn Doutrich, PhD, RN, CNS; Zana R. Higgs, PhD, RN; Janet Spuck, MS, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background and Specific Aims: Community and student demand for stronger, more relevant nursing leadership graduate programs provided the impetus for this study. Insufficient numbers of nurse leaders and nurse leaders without appropriate competencies are problematic in an era of severe nursing shortage (Wolf, Bradle, &amp; Nelson, 2005). Clearly, the quality of nursing leadership has a powerful impact on nurse retention (Maguire, Spencer, &amp; Sabatier, 2004). The aims of the study were to uncover meaningful themes related to highly competent nursing leadership, and to identify strategies to move the knowledge gained into nursing leadership education and practice. Methods: Twenty three nursing leaders from a variety of Oregon and Washington healthcare settings gathered in five focus groups. Informants included unit managers, clinic managers, staff development professionals, and top-level administrators. A semi-structured interview guide was used to elicit meaningful aspects of highly competent nursing leadership. Themes were identified independently and during small group interpretive sessions. Analysis proceeded from identification of recurrent themes to discovery of paradigm cases. Results: Themes identified both affirmed and differed from previously published findings. Participants implored education to help potential nurse leaders understand that leadership is a vital nursing function. Essential competencies identified by participants included communication proficiencies, especially listening skills, relationship development, conflict resolution skills, and mentoring. Nurse leaders also felt the need for greater data management capability. In addition, facility with technological and fiscal resources was considered key as was the ability to develop and communicate a vision. [A leader needs to] &quot;communicate that vision to others, and motivate and inspire them.&quot; Implications: Based on our findings, curricular revisions in our College of Nursing are being implemented and four masters courses related to nursing leadership are being updated. The findings have wider implications, however. Lessons from practice inform curricular decisions in undergraduate and graduate nursing programs, as well as influence the direction of continuing education offerings for nurse leaders. Nurse retention should be affected by increased numbers of nurse leaders grounded in practice and ready to provide vision for the future. Funded by the WSU Vancouver/SW Washington Medical Center Research Partnership in Healthcare.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:27:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:27:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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