2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158049
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Overview: Understanding Health Research Utilization in Rural Settings
Abstract:
Overview: Understanding Health Research Utilization in Rural Settings
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Edge, Dana, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Calgary
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Faculty of Nursing, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 1N4, Canada
Contact Telephone:403-220-6263
Co-Authors:Meg McDonagh, RN, MN, ENC (C)
Purpose: The aim of this symposium is to describe the mixed methods used to discover rural nurses' attitudes towards the use and access of research findings in clinical practice. Background: Recent focus on evidence-based nursing practice has spawned interest in how research findings are used in clinical practice. Barriers to research utilization have been studied in a variety of nursing settings, but little is known about health research accessibility and applicability in rural and remote areas of North America. Building on previous collaborations, researchers from Montana and Canada developed a plan to explore the issue of research utilization in rural settings in both jurisdictions. Methods: Qualitative interviews were undertaken in Montana during the spring semesters of 2004 and 2005 to elucidate how rural nurses defined research, as well as determine how they used research in practice. The preliminary findings from the Montana interviews informed the wording and construction of a survey questionnaire which was spearheaded by the Canadian research team. Piloting of the questionnaire in Montana was completed by April 2005 and following analyses, researchers met face-to-face to integrate findings from the qualitative and quantitative arms of the investigation.
Current Work: The first paper of this symposium, presented by Kathy Palm Jorgensen, outlines the findings from the qualitative interviews conducted among rural Montana nurses. Key messages in this paper include what practicing nurses consider as "research". The second paper, presented by Lianne Barnieh, describes questionnaire construction, pre-testing, cross-border logistics, reliability findings, as well as sources of knowledge and barriers to research utilization among participants of the pilot study. Chad O'Lynn finishes the symposium with the third paper that compares the pilot questionnaire findings with reported findings from the literature. The symposium concludes with a description of ongoing plans for more expansive sampling of rural health professionals and potential strategies to initiate improvement in research utilization among rural health practitioners. Funding: Supported by grants from Zeta Epsilon, Sigma Theta Tau International; MSU-B College of Nursing Block Grant; Social Sciences & Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) of Canada.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOverview: Understanding Health Research Utilization in Rural Settingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158049-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Overview: Understanding Health Research Utilization in Rural Settings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Edge, Dana, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Calgary</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Faculty of Nursing, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 1N4, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">403-220-6263</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dedge@ucalgary.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Meg McDonagh, RN, MN, ENC (C)</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The aim of this symposium is to describe the mixed methods used to discover rural nurses' attitudes towards the use and access of research findings in clinical practice. Background: Recent focus on evidence-based nursing practice has spawned interest in how research findings are used in clinical practice. Barriers to research utilization have been studied in a variety of nursing settings, but little is known about health research accessibility and applicability in rural and remote areas of North America. Building on previous collaborations, researchers from Montana and Canada developed a plan to explore the issue of research utilization in rural settings in both jurisdictions. Methods: Qualitative interviews were undertaken in Montana during the spring semesters of 2004 and 2005 to elucidate how rural nurses defined research, as well as determine how they used research in practice. The preliminary findings from the Montana interviews informed the wording and construction of a survey questionnaire which was spearheaded by the Canadian research team. Piloting of the questionnaire in Montana was completed by April 2005 and following analyses, researchers met face-to-face to integrate findings from the qualitative and quantitative arms of the investigation. <br/>Current Work: The first paper of this symposium, presented by Kathy Palm Jorgensen, outlines the findings from the qualitative interviews conducted among rural Montana nurses. Key messages in this paper include what practicing nurses consider as &quot;research&quot;. The second paper, presented by Lianne Barnieh, describes questionnaire construction, pre-testing, cross-border logistics, reliability findings, as well as sources of knowledge and barriers to research utilization among participants of the pilot study. Chad O'Lynn finishes the symposium with the third paper that compares the pilot questionnaire findings with reported findings from the literature. The symposium concludes with a description of ongoing plans for more expansive sampling of rural health professionals and potential strategies to initiate improvement in research utilization among rural health practitioners. Funding: Supported by grants from Zeta Epsilon, Sigma Theta Tau International; MSU-B College of Nursing Block Grant; Social Sciences &amp; Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) of Canada.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:27:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:27:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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