2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158050
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Foster Children's Traumatic Transitions
Abstract:
Foster Children's Traumatic Transitions
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Ellermann, Caroline, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Arizona University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, PO Box 15035, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011-5035, USA
Contact Telephone:928-523-6930
Purpose/Aims: Constructive childhood development is achieved when children live in a healthy, stable environment. Conditions in which a child grows up directly affects levels of self-confidence, trust, attachment and other developmental markers that influence success in adulthood. One of the aims of this exploratory research was to describe issues needed to support Hawaii foster children's mental and emotional health. Rationale/Background: Child neglect and/or a compromised health often prompt a state to remove a child from their biological home and assume responsibility for the child's care. When coming into a state's care the children often have serious and complex health problems. In Hawaii, and likely in other states, recent data suggests there is inadequate care once the state has placed a child in foster care. Deficiencies in mental health care are specifically identified in Hawaii. What interferes with adequate mental health care and identification of what the mental health issues are need to be addressed. Methods: A multiple category focus group design was used. A stakeholder advisory board generated the questions. One individual interview and six focus groups were conducted with 18 and 19 year old former foster youth, foster parents, and professionals working in the field. The recorded and transcribed interviews were examined through qualitative content analysis. The University of Hawaii committee on human subject provided project approval. Results: Each sector of participants identified and described the lack of support for mental and emotional health needs as substantial. Of the mental and emotional health issues, an important and common focus by all participants, relates to the problem of moving children from one foster home to another. The youth, parents and professionals identify a common issue related to moves, and different concerns. When moving a child between homes, the common issue relates to the amount of information to give new parents and gaps in the information. The data indicate that the youth want involvement in moves, a desirable structure for moves, clarity provided in expectations, and stability. The youth also identify strategies on how to get moved. Parents want organized purposeful moves, training on transitions, professional support, recognition of stress on the receiving family, some age appropriate accountability from the child, and honesty from the professionals. Professionals want preparation time for moves, parent training on transitions, and system problems addressed that split siblings and move children between schools and doctors. Implications This study begins to recognize that better home transitions can positively affect the mental and emotional health of foster children. The moves need to include: 1) better collaboration between the parent and professional, 2) establishing advanced child and new parent relationships when feasible, 3) child involvement in decisions, and 4) greater consideration for stability in schools and medical providers. Funding Support: This pilot study was funded through a National Institute of Nursing Research P20 grant, NR008360, Center for Health Disparities Research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFoster Children's Traumatic Transitionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158050-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Foster Children's Traumatic Transitions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ellermann, Caroline, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Arizona University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, PO Box 15035, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011-5035, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">928-523-6930</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">caroline.ellermann@nau.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: Constructive childhood development is achieved when children live in a healthy, stable environment. Conditions in which a child grows up directly affects levels of self-confidence, trust, attachment and other developmental markers that influence success in adulthood. One of the aims of this exploratory research was to describe issues needed to support Hawaii foster children's mental and emotional health. Rationale/Background: Child neglect and/or a compromised health often prompt a state to remove a child from their biological home and assume responsibility for the child's care. When coming into a state's care the children often have serious and complex health problems. In Hawaii, and likely in other states, recent data suggests there is inadequate care once the state has placed a child in foster care. Deficiencies in mental health care are specifically identified in Hawaii. What interferes with adequate mental health care and identification of what the mental health issues are need to be addressed. Methods: A multiple category focus group design was used. A stakeholder advisory board generated the questions. One individual interview and six focus groups were conducted with 18 and 19 year old former foster youth, foster parents, and professionals working in the field. The recorded and transcribed interviews were examined through qualitative content analysis. The University of Hawaii committee on human subject provided project approval. Results: Each sector of participants identified and described the lack of support for mental and emotional health needs as substantial. Of the mental and emotional health issues, an important and common focus by all participants, relates to the problem of moving children from one foster home to another. The youth, parents and professionals identify a common issue related to moves, and different concerns. When moving a child between homes, the common issue relates to the amount of information to give new parents and gaps in the information. The data indicate that the youth want involvement in moves, a desirable structure for moves, clarity provided in expectations, and stability. The youth also identify strategies on how to get moved. Parents want organized purposeful moves, training on transitions, professional support, recognition of stress on the receiving family, some age appropriate accountability from the child, and honesty from the professionals. Professionals want preparation time for moves, parent training on transitions, and system problems addressed that split siblings and move children between schools and doctors. Implications This study begins to recognize that better home transitions can positively affect the mental and emotional health of foster children. The moves need to include: 1) better collaboration between the parent and professional, 2) establishing advanced child and new parent relationships when feasible, 3) child involvement in decisions, and 4) greater consideration for stability in schools and medical providers. Funding Support: This pilot study was funded through a National Institute of Nursing Research P20 grant, NR008360, Center for Health Disparities Research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:27:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:27:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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